free hit
counters
Engine and Gearbox removal - 1981 Turbo Esprit Dry sump Restoration - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
  • entries
    16
  • comments
    22
  • views
    11,367

Engine and Gearbox removal

Sign in to follow this  
davetoff

383 views

I have now removed the engine and gearbox, this is with the intention of changing the cam belt, water pump and all rubber pipework with silicone hoses. Not only this but the gearbox whine needs to be looked at. I've come to the conclusion that a reconditioned gearbox is the best course of action, albeit an expensive one. No real problems here apart from the fact that my crane was only just high enough to get the engine and gearbox over the tail at the back of the car. Even with the load leveler, I had to lower the car on its jacks in order to get it over and then lift it manually as well. A few scratches and loads of expletives later I managed to haul it out….yay. Not too worried about the scratches for now as I am going for a respray anyway. However I think I will either hire an ‘A’ Frame to put it back in or separate the engine and gearbox and put them in individually, haven't decided which yet!

IMG_1107.JPG

Sign in to follow this  


6 Comments


Recommended Comments

Great job on getting the lump out,  Regarding the hiring of an A frame..  can you not just sit the rear end of the car litterally down on its chassis at the back with the wheels removed, and also looking at your picture can the chain not be ajusted on the engine hoist to give more height, if not bolt some of those excess links in the chain together.  Good luck with the belts and so on. 

Regarding the gearbox one of the fellows on here the other day mentioned a decent firm opposite pnm engineering, so may be worth chasing that up as you could just drop your box with him and you never no it may need nothing but a least a specialist can open it up and see if it need surgery or not, if not only for your piece of mind. as a recon box is not cheap and these boxes are normally pretty good. :)

Share this comment


Link to comment
5 hours ago, silverfrost said:

Great job on getting the lump out,  Regarding the hiring of an A frame..  can you not just sit the rear end of the car litterally down on its chassis at the back with the wheels removed, and also looking at your picture can the chain not be ajusted on the engine hoist to give more height, if not bolt some of those excess links in the chain together.  Good luck with the belts and so on. 

Regarding the gearbox one of the fellows on here the other day mentioned a decent firm opposite pnm engineering, so may be worth chasing that up as you could just drop your box with him and you never no it may need nothing but a least a specialist can open it up and see if it need surgery or not, if not only for your piece of mind. as a recon box is not cheap and these boxes are normally pretty good. :)

Hi Silverfrost, When getting the lump out I did drop the car to it's chassis with the wheels off, but you are right the chain looks like it could come up a little more on the end of the crane, not sure why I didn't do that <_<

Thanks for the info regarding firm near PNM I'll investigate it, the costs for this project seem to be mounting up, so any money I can save would be a bonus.

Share this comment


Link to comment

http://www.alanvoigtsgearboxes.co.uk/ was mentioned elsewhere.

Great work on the restoration. Its a slippery slope as you will just keep taking parts off till it resembles mine; many boxes of assorted parts!

I believe that its recommended to lift the engine and gearbox together as its more difficult if they are split.

:) 

Share this comment


Link to comment

If you remove the load-leveler you'll get more height. Use a polyester sling under the sump, and a ratchet tie-down between the end of the gearbox, and the point of lift. Leave the ratchet strap slackish, until the engine has cleared the mounts, then the tension will come onto the strap. Same procedure when it goes back in, leave the aft strap slightly slack, and you can adjust the angle using the ratchet. Worked perfectly for my last engine/box removal.

Share this comment


Link to comment
On 8/17/2016 at 02:33, silverfrost said:

Great job on getting the lump out,  Regarding the hiring of an A frame..  can you not just sit the rear end of the car litterally down on its chassis at the back with the wheels removed, and also looking at your picture can the chain not be ajusted on the engine hoist to give more height, if not bolt some of those excess links in the chain together.  Good luck with the belts and so on. 

Regarding the gearbox one of the fellows on here the other day mentioned a decent firm opposite pnm engineering, so may be worth chasing that up as you could just drop your box with him and you never no it may need nothing but a least a specialist can open it up and see if it need surgery or not, if not only for your piece of mind. as a recon box is not cheap and these boxes are normally pretty good. :)

Do you happen to know the name of the gearbox supplier next to PNM Eningeering? If not can you remember the thread? Looking at putting this lump back in shortly. I have a funny feeling that it's the dreaded circlip that's either broken off or slipped off, if that is the case then it should be an easy fix! Thanks in advance.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Hi Dave,    It is a post called  S2 gearbox rebuild, the poster is Daniel on here.  Just put that in the search engine on here as i cant post links :blush:

But the name of the firm they speak of is called  Allen Voigts gearboxes.  Worth giving him a shout to see what the damage to your pocket would be for giving the gearbox a once over. :thumbup:   I  am sure other members will come up with some other places they have used and recommend also hopefully .:yes:

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×