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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/11/19 in all areas

  1. Today in the Swiss Alps.. empty streets, as normally the mountain passes are closed in November.. but not yet today.. lucky me 😊
    7 points
  2. 😄 Thank you! Feel free to use any of my pictures. The Evora is just t h e best escape car - all year around.
    3 points
  3. I resemble that remark...
    3 points
  4. Why don't we wait and see? Why in this internet age is every one so damn inpatient and quick to focus on the down sides of everything. The fact is, given where the company was and still is really, just to have the ambition, the wherewithall, the skill, and the vision to get the Type 130 this far is amazing. I for one will be happy to wait and see what Lotus does with this and will then judge it a success or not based on real fact, rather than anything else.
    3 points
  5. Most V8s don’t need them really anyway as they normally sit decorating garages
    3 points
  6. And here I was thinking I was the only one that thought this.
    2 points
  7. 6. Man With the Golden Greasegun After another trip up to Scotland to see Simon and the progress he had made on his S1 I returned with the task of getting the Esprit’s body shell to the paint shop. The tailgate glass had been removed and carefully stored in a makeshift hardwood slim case for safekeeping. As well as removing the replacement ‘Sundym’ green tinted aftermarket windscreen which was not going to be going back on the car. The large caster wheels on the custom made dolly made light work of pushing the body shell on and off the trailer. I’d planned for it to be away for 6-8 weeks, but in the end it would be 12 weeks, and this allowed John to easily move it around his workshop at the various stages without it getting in the way of his other work. There was plenty enough time for me to work on the engine, finish the chassis and get the lower half ready for installing the upper half. The car hadn’t run for some time, but the couple of compression tests that had been done looked promising. There was also evidence of recent work to the upper half, and the oil didn’t show anything worrying. With no signs of leaks from the various seals and joints. I was conscious that I didn’t want the restoration to flounder due to a lack of funds mid-way as I’ve seen and heard of unfinished projects sitting for very long periods, which can become a problem down the line. I didn’t want to put myself in the position of having to sell a half built restoration if things took a turn for the worst down the line for any reason. Odd, but this was my main concern at this point, but I was now neck deep into this restoration. For me I was going to overhaul the engine and see how it went. I also wanted to drive an S1 as it felt in the 1970’s and wasn’t interested in increasing its performance to that extent. A new timing belt along with an automatic tensioner from SJ Sportscars was fitted, greatly helped by Bill Galbraith’s @bgalbraith online video. I’m not sure if a manual tensioner from Gary Kemp would have been best, which uses a high quality metal bearing and doesn’t require the earth strap? I have recently bought a Burroughs Gauge in case I ever decided to fit one at the next timing belt service. The water pump had been on back order for over 8 months and was now holding me up. SJ Sportscars then said that it was no longer available, and PNM said it would take a few weeks to supply a reconditioned one. Fortunately Gary Kemp had a very good exchange unit which I collected whilst filming in the Bridlington area. Thus making sure it was exactly the same item. The only thing I had to do in this area was re-tap one of the water pump bolts. I fitted a cap screw instead to aid future removal, as the bolt head can foul the cam pulley. The camshafts and followers looked in very good condition, and the cam covers were fitted following information on these forums as to the amount of fixative to use. A new clutch and clutch cover was installed, and the all important washer was added to the gearbox shaft and the two units were bolted together. The engine and gearbox was now ready to be lifted into the chassis. This went as well as its removal 7 months earlier. Being straightforward without being hindered by the body shell. With the water pump now fitted I could plumb in the water system. Something I’d had to work out as mine was in bits when I purchased the car. I had to draw it out on a piece of paper to work out where stuff went, and what was missing, if anything. Fitting the single piece stainless steel manifold whilst still a bare chassis was easy, and I also added heat shielding to the chassis frame and cross-brace whilst access was good. The nearside engine mounting also got its own metal heat shield, as well as being wrapped in the heat shielding material also. I wasn’t going to take chances of it melting! It was also a good opportunity to test fit the rest of the exhaust system to see how it would all go together before the body shell made things more awkward. During a warm sunny afternoon I took some time to clean up the gear knob. Which a previous owner had painted red. It looked like a snooker ball, and I thought it was actually plastic. Though the metal gate diagram in the top was a give-away. Once gently sanded down the wood underneath the paint came up great. After a few coats of varnish it was good as new. I was able to then sell the NOS item I’d purchased a few months earlier and swell my restoration coffers with some much needed cash. Meanwhile a new gearshift and lever had arrived with my next parts order, as I had found that mine was too slack due to a previous owner repair. Jo Chan had completed the overhaul of the carbs and dispatched them a few weeks earlier. They looked great, and they now took pride of place on the engine. A new 65Amp alternator was also fitted so that enough juice was generated to power the additional high power electric fans I had planned for the cooling system. The starter motor had been refurbished by a great little workshop in Middlesbrough for a very reasonable sum, and this was added along with the oil cooler. The air box I’d restored with new latches from Pertex in Redditch during late spring was also fitted. It retained its original insulation which was a nice touch. The lower air box I’d cleaned up and fitted with a new stainless steel mesh inlet cover to match the original was also test fitted. It had originally been a rather sorry item, but copious scrubbing with engine degreaser had brought it up looking like new. Oddly it's these two ancillary items I'm most proud of. The last things added to the chassis were the steering rack, which had been given a spruce-up, as it appeared to have been a relatively new item by a previous owner, and the anti-roll bar. After 7 or more months of continuous work over the autumn and winter the garage was now due for a sort out, to allow me to create a little more space for the next stage of the restoration. The chassis was now fully complete and rolling. With many of the heavier and cumbersome parts that I had boxed now fitted. The much needed space was very welcome, as the next major stage was going to need a lot more room.
    2 points
  8. It's pushing an SE for sale but there's some interesting info & no glaring mistakes. Click 😀
    2 points
  9. Just another great reason to buy an NA!
    2 points
  10. Great @Final Edition it would be worth meeting up, as the car is working really well. I've covered just over 600 miles since July and I've solved all of the teething troubles during this shakedown period. Pity your Sport 300 won't be on the road.
    2 points
  11. 1. You Only Live Once Way back in 2011 I spotted a Lotus Esprit S1 on the US Bring A Trailer website and was interested in its newly restored condition, and surprised by the cacophony of a ‘Jock Bond’ interior which I’d never seen before. A further quick search on the web brought up another chap in the US who had restored his gleaming S1 to a fine level of finish. I was impressed. However, since I’d not long completed the restoration of my S unbeam Alpine Series II and my business was just about recovering from the effects of the recession I was not in the mood to buy and dive into another restoration. It was just a car that I’d long admired since a July evening in 1977 when my parents took me to see The Spy Who Loved Me at the Scarborough Odeon. I then spent the rest of those holidays traipsing around every toy shop in North Yorkshire in my quest to find the Corgi Toy of James Bond’s amazing car to match my all singing all dancing Aston Martin DB5. I later bought one from my local toy shop after the school holidays had finished and the shops restocked. Oddly enough, my parents and I had holidayed in London the previous autumn and we attended the Earls Court MotorFair whilst there. I remember queuing up for the Lotus stand, only to be turned away by the salesman guarding entry as being too young. Little did I know then that the stand’s popularity was down to the launch of Lotus’ new car, the Esprit. I returned to my awaiting parents who bought me a hog roast sandwich as a way of reconciliation. Apart from seeing the Esprit Turbos on the Lotus Stand at the NEC Motor Show in 1982 and picking up some brochures that was the last I saw of the Giugiaro cars, as none seemed to exist on Teesside during the 1970s and 80s. Cut back to 2011, and me digging out those very same brochures from my parents loft now that I’d recently moved back up t’north, and the brochures piqued my interest in the car. The Corgi Toy having also returned with me after languishing in a book case for the 25 years whilst I was living in the West Midlands. Moving further forwards to early 2016 a Facebook group caught my attention which seemed to be devoted to all things Lotus Esprit which I ‘liked’ and was immediately drawn in to the various posts and resulting discussions. One was about an orange Esprit S1 which seemed to attract a large number of comments. I joined in and discussed the beautiful design and the lines that form the rear quarter, and those beautifully sexy fuel filler caps flanked by THAT font. So 1970s yet so modern. See, design is my thing. I work in the creative industries running a video production company and fonts and angles are my thang. The Sunbeam which I bought in 1988 with my first wages was designed in the late 1950’s by a single person, and passed virtually to the production phase without hardly a modification request from Lord Rootes. The Esprit I recognised as also having the very same credentials. And I could tell. The Esprit S1 was no car designed by a committee. Just a chap with a pencil and paper, a creative vision, and the engineering support of a rather unique and exotic car firm. I quickly got to know a fellow Esprit admirer in Simon Thomson who lives just outside of Glasgow and who had just begun to restore an S1. I was impressed and over the next 2 months I began to ponder ownership. However, I realised that S1s weren’t exactly common, and messaged a pal and fellow Bond fan who lives in LA to look out for an example. Since I had no Lotus knowledge or connections, and was not from the car industry I figured that I had more chance of finding a Federal one and importing it than finding a RHD version. Otherwise I’d soon be priced out of the market. I had access to a single garage, which although it didn’t have electricity it was wide enough to accommodate an Audi A4 with enough space at the front. In June my pal in LA messaged me of a white S1 for sale in Minnesota for US$20,000. It was in good condition too. However that morning I was due to set off south on a 400 mile drive to Sussex via LotusBits just off the M6 near Rugby and a garage in Canterbury. Both of which had Esprit S3s for sale. Though I really wanted an S1, or failing that an S2, preferring their simpler lines and smaller bumpers. Whilst on my drive I received an email saying that an S2 that had been for sale months earlier had sold, and found the S3 at LotusBits was too expensive. I wasn’t persuaded by Mike’s comment that it would probably go by the weekend, and I still had the Canterbury car to see. I made Kent just before teatime and the metallic blue/green S3 was a nice example though battered for its very low 36,000 miles on the clock, having spent a long time in the sun. I left with this in mind and headed off to overnight at pal’s in Sussex. On my return back to the North East via London to pick up some high end video camera equipment I called a car transportation outfit that Simon had used previously and I got a price for trailering a car up. On arrival home I called the seller in Minnesota to find that his S1 was under offer. Exhausted from my 2 days of driving, I had to call him back to say that if the buyer pulled out and his deposit didn’t materialise that to give my second refusal. The EU Referendum has just happened a few days before and we briefly discussed the potential exchange rate fluctuations which no doubt would occur over the coming weeks. Little did I know that within a little over 6 weeks I would commit myself and available funds, and be following a trailer with a UK Esprit S1 up the A1 in the dead of night and 3 long years of restoration ahead of me.
    1 point
  12. https://firesafetystick.com/
    1 point
  13. I totally agree - it's serviced rather well in every possible aspect. In no way was my comment an encouragement to rev high not warmed up engine (in fact it is better to wait a bit longer since oil warms up slower than the coolant), I only meant to make this t clear that there isn't any cold start protection in this car (obviously, apart from dedicated ignition and fuel maps, as with pretty much any other car).
    1 point
  14. Yes the belts and almost everything else is changed. Long time ago i posted some pics, it will come more soon 😉 Yes i’m also thinking of doing what you did and letting a pro do the last things.
    1 point
  15. Almost worth the cost of losing a wheel just to see the reaction of the clampers.
    1 point
  16. Thanks for posting this, I've not seen them before but they look really good. I've got conventional extinguishers in the garage and kitchen but think I'll change them for these plus one for each car. I like the way they don't leave a powdery mess to clean up too.
    1 point
  17. Just saw it. The comments section is predictable as always. Dunno if worth making a Pistonheads account help set the record straight.
    1 point
  18. If that's the case then a lot of Lotus Forums members will be whooping with joy! Their upturned Polo shirt collars will be quivering with joy ..
    1 point
  19. Matt's a huge fan of the Evora GT , 400 and 410, and its interesting how he says its different to the C8 and 911, I thank Lotus for that keep it up guys
    1 point
  20. Top banana that, looks great!
    1 point
  21. Agreed. One is vanity, one is sanity! I had heard they were taking a steady stream of orders. Mine would have been for an exposed carbon weave in green with yellow highlights, but the wife wanted a new kitchen....
    1 point
  22. Im not a fan of mesh if I'm honest, I just don't like the look of it, hence why I've gone this route vs say the WinAce items. That open aperture of the scoop just looks cool so im keen to not hide it with front facing mesh. However, I do feel protection is required, mesh will be used at the rear of the scoop. On the intake side, I'm getting a round mesh frame made (example below), this will sit into the OEM intake elbow (red circle). The intake elbow is taken off the OEM scoops and re-attached to the carbon scoop as part of the install process. As the mesh is on the inside of the intake elbow it makes it both compatible with folks running a standard OEM airbox as well as those running KT or alias23 intake. The mesh will not be visible but I'll likely get it anodised black to satisfy my OCD. On the other side of the car the rear mesh if you look into the scoop is 'just' visible, so ill be looking to use anodised black mesh (example below) which will be bonded into place. Thanks to those who've ordered. I'll be looking to complete final numbers over the weekend and ordering with the supplier Monday.
    1 point
  23. It's interesting hearing the different experiences. I added a 3-Eleven to the garage earlier this year, as I wanted something a bit "more" than the Elise Cup. I've been absolutely thrilled with the car. On the track, it's definitely a handful in comparison. I find the Elise very flattering on the track. A few laps & I'm normally pretty comfortable. If I make a small mistake, no big deal as the Elise deals with that pretty well. Not quite the same in the 3-Eleven. Of course, everything is coming at you a whole lot faster, but it also requires you to really stay in tune with it & have a better awareness of what's going on. I feel like I always have to be feeling the car & adjusting appropriately. If I go just a hair past my breaking point, it makes a bigger difference than the same mistake in the Elise. On the other hand, when I start to absolutely nail a turn well, I find that I'm now needing to adjust more and more for the next turn as my speed, at what was my breaking point last lap, is now much higher. Of course, some of this likely comes down to me being a rather middling driver, and probably perfectly normal for a better driver, but, brutal speed & acceleration aside, it's definitely been the biggest difference between the two cars. I actually really like this aspect of the car though. I've had occasional points with the Elise where I just feel like I'm going through the motions while turning a lap. The level of involvement when driving the 3-Eleven means I've never had that, expect for perhaps during a cool-down lap. On the road for a nice Sunday drive through the local hills I find I enjoy the 3-Eleven more than the Elise at non-license losing speeds. Much more visceral, even at low speeds. The wind, the occasional dips & rises in temperature, the smells, the sounds... the everything. It's all there & amplified. The Elise would still win out for a weekend getaway with the wife, but just a nice morning of alone time... 3-Eleven any day. Regarding comfort... definitely decent eye protection when driving around town or at reasonable speeds through the local hills. Autobahn excursions (I drive to/from the track as well), mean I'll be wearing my helmet. Some debris getting kicked up when you're in a normal car may mean a cracked windshield. I don't want to find out what that might mean when your face is the windshield. Unlike others, I have not found the outside temperature to really be much of a bother. I'm on the shorter side though, so I'm pretty well tucked into the cockpit. I can't say I've ever felt any real wind on my hands & once the car is warmed up, the heat coming up from the radiator just outside the cockpit is actually quite noticeable (big negative when sitting in traffic in mid summer). Above ~200 or 220kph on the Autobahn & wind buffeting on my helmet gets to be pretty bad. No helmet lift problems for me (again, I'm sitting pretty low in the cockpit), but my helmet can shake around quite a bit. Adding the spoiler & chin aero bits to my Arai helmet has helped somewhat, but I'm still want to find something better. I try to avoid any sign of wet, but the tonneau cover + some basic rain gear have getting caught in the rain not all that bad. If it wasn't for a bit of traffic, the rain gear probably wouldn't have even made a difference. Once you stop moving though, the rain is going to fall on you, so a nice set of waterproofs comes along anytime I'm headed to the track & there's a chance of rain in one direction or the other. I still have the Elise, so if it's more than just a chance of rain while on the way to/from, or if there's a real chance of rain during track time, I'll drive that instead. Largely though, neither car gets driven in the rain. Truly my biggest complaint about the entire care would be the windscreen on the tonneau cover. The top edge of it cuts directly across my line of sight & so I've just simply taken it off for now (again, I'm relatively short. I'd bet if your 5'10" or above, it wouldn't be an issue). Getting a spare & cutting it down just a hair is definitely on my to-do list for this next year. Windscreen on the 2-seater cover doesn't quite have the same effect as it's not transparent & so just cuts a small bit off the bottom of my vision, which would only be seeing the nose of the car anyway. It's a great car & tons of fun. Sad that there's not very many of them out there, but there were many more 3-Elevens at track days this year than I saw last year. (I'm guessing way less than 311 cars were built. I think the count was 103 Road cars before the start of production on the 430 model, and there were only supposed to be like 20 of those... so 188 Race cars were made?)
    1 point
  24. Remote buttons are great -- wonderful option from AiM....... http://www.aimsports.com/en/products/remote-buttons-interface/index.htm Love my MXS dash/data logger. Car is beautiful...enjoy.
    1 point
  25. Took my dog in yesterday for big elbow operation,3-5 months recovery time.Did a few tests and it wasn’t elbow,but shoulder,so should be much better in a couple of weeks!
    1 point
  26. A lot of call online for something new, literally anything as long as it’s new. It’s presumably based on the view that newer automatically equals better which is not a view I share. It seems to ignore the trends across the wider industry, far fewer resources have been directed towards drivers cars, let alone fantastic handling sports cars with interesting, characterful petrol powertrains. Lotus are now dedicated on reaching out beyond the hardcore enthusiast market. That means more accessible, less hardcore (less exciting) cars, targets are greater ease of entry/egress and interior tech not finely judged spring rates, throttle response, obsessively honed steering systems and other things the wider market don’t care about. If this is all people want when they ask for something new, this is all they’ll get.
    1 point
  27. Will pop some up on collection day but....
    1 point
  28. Whilst browsing the various exhibits I was interested in finding a Lion comic from the 1960's with a feature story on Jim Clark on the front cover, and the Lotus logo under the heading "Badges of the Brave" . (Im presuming this is describing Jim Clark racing prowess rather than the rest of us who actual drive them on the roads!) I use to get this comic when I was a kid but I cannot remember this one (perhaps I had moved on). Also on display was a Ladybird Easy Reader book featuring Jim Clark. (another page shows Fangio). As an avid book collector as well as Lotus driver, I, of course had to add this book and comic to my collection!
    1 point
  29. At Bruntigthorpe today and spotted this parked up under a Nimrod's wing!
    1 point
  30. 1 of 7 JPS tribute at Australia's top Concourse in Melbourne, Motorclassica.The car is for sale and outside with a plethora of other exotic.
    1 point
  31. You just drive real fast
    1 point
  32. Here are a few more photos:
    1 point
  33. 2014 NA Sport Racer in Nightfall Blue. With GTE style front end. I have always preferred the rear over that of the later models, much cleaner. But ever so slightly preferred the front of the later models so for me this car was my ideal compromise. According to the certificate it is number 10 out of all the Sport Racer NA, is number three out of the four that are in Nightfall Blue and the only one of those four with diamond cut alloys
    1 point
  34. two at snows circa late 2015. The orange one was lovely.
    1 point
  35. I've just remembered - I have another Video of the sound... my 18month old boy doing his V6 impression
    1 point
  36. We have finally come to the conclusion that farming is now more hassle than it's worth and we are starting to run down our farming activities. The Bull is going this month and the others will start going soon after (we may keep a few just for the hell of it but we will see). After 15 years it is a real shame but farming has just become too much of a grind. Added EU bureaucracy that has basically become anti-small farms, big increases in costs with no increase in sales prices, Anti- beef sentiment etc... - the list just goes on has just made it not worth doing. The past 8 years have been hell (parents with dementia, alcoholism and more) and we need a break, the last thing we need to be doing is something that grinds us down even further and having to pay for the privilege grates even more. It's a shame and feels a bit of a failure but at least we know our animals have had the best possible lives.
    0 points

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