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  1. A sheared stud is something you are very likely to come across during restorations . Getting them out can be a pain , in a lot of cases leading the the need to Helicoil repair the thread.. When this work is done with an engine still fitted the results are to say the least basic.. This is due to the space constraints. As an engine builder i have seen the results of these, oh dear some are not nice. This does not need to be the case , a little preparation time and a simple DIY jig can make the job so much easier with professional results. The same principal can be used to set up Helicoil insertion on the correct alignment. Helicoils that have been drilled and inserted out of square or proper alignment , create so many issues and are my biggest head ache to rectify. Hopefully the following info will help you get quality DIY results without the hassle .. This is what we have all seen at one time or another.. On this occasion , inlet manifold center stud. As it turns out i do not have a jig made for this position ( not so common to shear) , So lets make one .. I always tend to use pieces of 10mm thick alloy plate , If you don't have any in your garage they are easily found at your local metal recycle center in the alloy scrap bins.. cost is pennies.. First job is to mark out accurately. use calipers and a coat of black aerosol paint if not in possession of marking blue. Next making sure the plate is flat and 90 degrees to the vertical , using drill press or in my case mill head, drill through pilot holes then in this case 8mm drill .. NB. The manifold will be drilled 8.5mm clearance , we want our holes to be quite tight on the bolt , no wiggle room , this will help the job be more accurate. Next job is to drill the hole relating to the sheared stud at the tapping size for thread on your chosen guide. In this case I have used M10. If you are going for Hilicoil M12 is better. Set the tap up in the mill head / drill press , use this method to insure your thread will be perfectly square... this is very important , If your thread is just slightly angled the job will go wrong. The next step is to use , in this case a M10 allen cap bolts , Purchase several, You may need to go to local machine shop for the next process to be accurate , Using a lathe, drill down the center of the bolts with different size drills, I use 2.5mm .. 4mm .. 5.5mm and 6.5mm for an M8 stud.. If repairing stripped thread, you just go up to the size of the Helicoil drill ... You will then have 4 or 5 allen bolts core drilled in different sizes.. That is it Jig is made.. To set up , clean the face on the area to be repaired , if like in this case the head of the stud is proud , using small file flatten the face , then pin punch the center. Put jig in place , bolting down with two other holes, if you have done this carefully the M10 tapped hole will align perfect over the sheared stud. ( Make sure this is the case before going onto the next step.. ) Now fit in position the first bolt with the smallest core hole . Screw down till it lightly buts up against the stud face the lock of with a nut. Next thing to do is measure the depth of an adjacent hole to the stud you will be drilling. Add this figure to the height of the jig from the head face . This will give you a safe drilling depth without damaging the head by accidentally drilling through into water jacket or oil gallery. Believe me this has been done !!! Set you drill in the chuck to this height , or put tape on drill bit indicating safe depth. Apply suitable cutting fluid and proceed to drill . Do this in stages , cleaning out swarf and adding more cutting fluid.. If your stud does not bottom out in the hole you will feel the drill free up as it enters the free space , if not stop at pre set depth. Once you have drilled the first pilot hole , Remove the bolt, blow off and inspect work. You should now have a perfectly central hole that stays true all the way down the sheared stud. Next move to the next size core drilled bolt, insert into the jig and repeat process.. In the case of an M8 thread , i go up to a 5,5mm drill then see if the stud will come out with an extractor.. Unfortunately in this case it was not interested , even after penetrating fluid being applied down the hole and being allowed to soak.. So on to the next bolt core size ... This will be 6.5 mm which is just under the tapping drill size of 6.8 for the M8 thread.. Once this is drilled down , I remove the jig , then using a pick tool i can clear the top couple of threads, this then gives a start for a tap.. In cases like this i use a pug tap as i want it to chip out the remaining thread rather than cutting which a taper tap would try to do. Use plenty of cutting oil when doing this and the desired result should be achieved. Job very nearly complete.. just need to test the quality of the thread. So i insert the new stud and torque to the require level of 12 ftlbs ... In this case it was spot on ... However , if it had not tightened to spec and puled out the thread then we would refit jig and drill to Heliocoil size , tap and fit coil. with the confidence that it is in perfectly straight.. Hopefully this will help you successfully resolve your sheared stud issue ... I use this method in all sorts of guises to facilitate this type of repair.. Happy restorations ... Dave (Changes)
    9 points
  2. It’s not even ran in yet but on Saturday I’m swapping this: For this: The sleepless nights are beginning to kick in and the weekend can’t come quick enough.
    6 points
  3. Seriously, Fabian, give it to PNM. I'm not sure what the forum page limit is.
    6 points
  4. In celebration of my upcoming 10th anniversary on the forum, and no posts to my name, I'd like to announce the purchase of my new Elise. Its a Cup 250 thats being put together as I type by the good people at Hethel. Hoping for a March delivery🤞. I've lurked for long enough😉
    4 points
  5. Hi guys, I have been a serial Lotus owner for 6 cars, starting off with a 1972 Elan+2S/130, then M100 Elan SE Turbo, two Exige S2s, then a NA 2010 Evora, now back to the Lotus fold with a new Evora GT410 Sport Its a peach! Thx, Mark
    4 points
  6. The dealer just sent this over, 2 sleepless nights to go!
    4 points
  7. Fabian I think youve been incredibly brave taking the entire project on but equally youre abilities are something you should be very proud of. You achieve more in a day than I achieve in 6 months sometimes. Occasionally however you do have to hold your hands up and say I need some assistance. Ive learnt that to my cost in the past and sometimes you have to admit you cant do it all. I would consider taking your wife away for a break but via PNM first myself.
    4 points
  8. Hi, it was recommended to me that I should join the forums by Dan E. I bought my first Lotus, an Elise R in 2011 and have recently changed that for an Elise 220 Sport. I purchased the original car from Paul Parker at what was Lipscomb Lotus. The recent purchase was made with Jamie Matthews at Bell and Colvill. When Lipscombs were no longer I started having the car looked after by Maidstone Sports cars. Always up for some drives, track days or meet ups so looking forward to meeting a few of you once the weather improves. Cheers, Tony.
    3 points
  9. 3 points
  10. Me, a Cup 250. Should be with me in March. It will be my 10th Elise since 1998. My feeling is that the Elise won’t be around much longer, so decided to get a new one while I can.
    3 points
  11. I recently bought a new Exige 350 and am loving it.. So much more in so much less, and you can drive one around and not feel too flash. People seem to like Lotus cars, they look aggressive but also friendly, (Especially in Vivid green) Add a few mods and you can be keeping up with Ferraris and McLarens in a car that's smaller and nimbler. So much character and feel.
    3 points
  12. This year I have decided to go racing. I will be competing in most if not all of the C1 events (work permitting). The highlights will be the Silverstone 24hr and the Spa 24hr! I will narrate it all here including costs along the way. Doing my initial research when looking into 'going racing' there was very little info on costs and how to do it, so thought it might be useful for others considering the same. Initially we were going to buy a road going C1 and do some spannering ourselves to make it race ready. However owing to work commitments from all drivers we have decided to just pay-as-you-go each event, which is probably more expensive but much easier. First step is getting the ARDS test done which I have booked to do at Goodwood on the 20th March. At £389 it's a bit more than some but you do get three 15 minute track sessions. More to follow.....
    2 points
  13. Yep, me too. Hopefully should arrive in April. Very excited 😃
    2 points
  14. Finished and ready to go on the radiator 👍🏻
    2 points
  15. That was in the Orange S I had on long term loan back in 2011 on the way to the Frankfurt motor show. I think we had to fill up every 45 mins keeping up that kind of speed!
    2 points
  16. Personally, I think your assumption is flawed. Think about it. How many of these engines have similar factory followers and are still working perfectly? I think it has been a mistake to not forensically examine the sludge if that is the route you seem to want to take. It's engine basics really. I believe that the damage to the cam follower is more likely due to a lack of oil from the oil way associated with it. Possibly restricted, or prevented from lubricating it. Whether that is bead, or by some other material. I've said it before, and I'll state it again; Occam's razor and all that. There are many opinions already posted by a wide number of folk with greater expert knowledge in these engines than I, but I really do think you are barking up the wrong tree. New cam followers will not solve this problem alone.
    2 points
  17. Look are you gonna get it rebuilt or not - I’m on the edge of my seat here
    2 points
  18. Updating my braking thread......it took me awhile, but I thought I deserved a proper B'day present.... so, time to ditch the vacuum booster and go to a dual master brake cage setup.....work is in progress....photo worth another 1000 words. Looking forward to learning how to brake anew.
    2 points
  19. I was away for 2 years partially because I was waiting to see whether Lotus vanished or not, but once Geely bought them, given their track record with Volvo, I thought it was safe to take the plunge. But mostly I came back because I couldn't find anything that drove quite like my NA Evora. I tried the latest 911, but it was too similar to drive like my mark7.5 Golf R - Porsche have ruined the steering with EPAS. And the only 911 I really wanted to buy is the GT3, which you can only buy new from Porsche Wilmslow if you are a footballer, which I am not. At the end of the day, for me, it's what the car is like to drive. It's good to be back home. PS. Maybe it is. Maybe not.
    2 points
  20. Im not 100 percent on what caused this. The only hard evidence is the cam follower breaking up. The pump wear and the rest may have all been caused by this one thing. Well the bottom end is off. Pistons and bores appear ok, but need measuring. All bearings have scoring and must ve replaced. Big end journals need a regrind. A lot of cash! Im not sure whether I want to rebuild thie again. The amount if effortand time I spent this should not have ocurred. Im asking myself if I should just go on holiday, get an expert to do it and come back to a new engine! That way if it goes the same way its their fault! Oh well Imhave a think about it!
    2 points
  21. Some previous Lotuses I owned.. Thank you 😀
    2 points
  22. As far as wiring harness issues, there was a poll conducted over here (back in '15) to see who had their harness replaced and what years were impacted. The results of the poll showed that the early cars appear to be less impacted than MY12+. I don't believe any '11 owners ever reported a harness replacement. Here are the extracted poll results of replaced wiring harnesses: 2010 Evora NA MT (NOTE: harness short due to coolant leak, so probably shouldn't be counted) 2012 Evora NA IPS 2012 Evora S MT 2013 Evora NA IPS 2013 Evora S IPS 2013 Evora MT (replaced 2x) 2014 Evora S MT 2014 Evora S MT 2014 Evora S IPS 2014 Evora S IPS
    2 points
  23. Couple of things from me (I own a 15 SR NA) - I had to get my starter motor replaced - apparently it's fairly common issue with S1 models - and I think it was upgraded with a more reliable part with the 400 series. Be worth checking see if this has been done already - check the floor mats & boot for dampness - thankfully i don't have this issue but early Evoras suffered a bit from this - the harness on early S1 was lower quality than the MY12 and above - if you end with with harness replacement it could be be big bucks (5 days work apparently) - the clutch can be expensive to replace so worth checking if the car has been tracked frequently - I've got the Sports Racer so is pretty much fully loaded. I'd recommend you get one with a reverse camera - rear visibility is not good otherwise - the boot mechanism can sometimes not release properly , it can be a bit sticky - check this to make sure the lid doesn't need alignment - check the tyre pressure monitors have been properly seated - to avoid slow decompression of the tyre I've had mine for nearly a year - such an epic car - you won't regret it
    2 points
  24. Well another New Year with the Turbo Esprit.....and tonight she was picked up to set off on a journey down. Time to get some more mechanical TLC from someone who really knows these cars well👍
    2 points
  25. Saw a few GT's when I popped to Spa last year... @PhilW, sorry to hear about your neighbours home, that's one hell of a fire. Good on your and your local community to rally around. Having recently been through a flood which involved most of the internals of the house being rebuilt, I feel a small percentage of their pain.
    2 points
  26. Well here is the binnacle, hope it looks as good in the flesh... cheers
    2 points
  27. Fantastic news for the staff and us!. Leven Lotus Edinburgh liked a few of my instagram pictures todays so it appears they are back on Grid!😀
    2 points
  28. Superdudes! And beardy types. I am about to return my Esprit to the roads of Britain and thought I would give you a bit of a heads up, seeing as you're into this type of thing. But, please note; a, this is not a restoration, and, b, I have not done any of the work myself (thankfully for all concerned, including the car). Background - two and a half years ago I decided to buy an S1 and modify it (on the basis that the car in original form could not be considered a daily driver). But, it became clear that to modify an S1 would be a bit like touching up the Mona Lisa, so I decided not to take on the sandal and pipe brigade and settled for an S2. Now, at the time, there were actually more S1's (one) on the market than S2's (none)! The market has changed muchly since then (there are now more S2's (and Sport 350's, weirdly) than bearded middle aged men to drive them!). Luckily, Bibs rode his keyboard to the rescue and I ended up buying a partially restored S2 from Bell and Colvill, which happened to laying low at their super secret workshop in Bristol; namely Tomorrow's Classics. And, there it has remained for the past two and a half years, being stripped and poked and hammered and bolted. And sworn at. The intent - To create a 'G' Esprit that can be used everyday, with absolute priority going to safety and reliability, without fundamentally altering the look. The work - the list of work completed on the car is, not unusually, quite extensive. So, please take all the elements of a standard 'body off' 'nut-and-bolt' restoration as read, including upgrading where practicable. In sum, the major work has included: Mechanical: Refurbished, powder-coated chassis Refurbished and upgraded engine to high compression 2.2 litre fuel injection system and stainless steel exhaust Upgraded suspension system, lowered and adjusted for larger wheels Upgraded brakes Upgraded gearbox and clutch with new gear linkages, lightweight flywheel, clutchplate etc Refurbished steering rack Upgraded cooling system with alloy radiator, triple fans, water pump, stainless steel pipes etc Added oil cooling system Replaced HV unit with integrated, compact HV+AC system (compressor, condenser, evaporator etc) Replaced windscreen wiper motor, arm and blade with uprated version Replaced fuel tanks with baffled versions, increase tank-to-tank flow, fuel pump etc Interior: Re-sighted/replaced 2 air vents with 2 circular vents (to side window positions) Added control panel to binnacle for HV+AC Added sound proofing / insulation (dynamat and dynaliner and lots of it) Replaced seat belts (change belt colour to tan) Replaced interior marcasite trim with brown alcantara Added S1 style central chrome ashtray (central arm rest 'de-ribbed') Painted new binnacle facia satin black, upgraded gauges, replaced switchgear and warning lights Bodywork: Replaced fuel filler caps with locking versions (S3 style) and painted body colour Removed original aerial and painted hole in bodywork Replaced wheels with Woolfrace styled highly polished, wider replica 17” special build wheels Painted engine cover and hatch gold Replaced front and rear screens with 'special build' versions Electrical: Upgraded electrical system with high capacity battery, alternator and wiring etc Added reversing camera and 2 reversing sensors (flush into the rear bumper) Replaced speakers, relocated to rear bulkhead and added tweeters to A pillars Replaced stereo with double din Apple Car Play mechless system (Sony XAV-AX100), including phone preparation, integrated radio aerial and USB power socket to glove box Added central locking / remote boot release / alarm and immobiliser Replaced all bulbs everywhere with LEDs Added LED DRLs to front air intake (in front of grille) Added side indicators Added high rear LED brake light Replaced headlights with bi-xenon There's still a little of this list left to be completed, but the car is on the home straight, with just the electrical installation, ECU programming and road testing to be completed. The workers - as I have said, not me. Tomorrow's Classics, based just north of Bristol have completed the work (both before and after change of ownership), and I can not praise them highly enough. Nick, Rory, Steve, James (their leccie superdude) and Keith (on upholstery) have done a superb job and come highly recommended. But don't take my word for it, Bell and Colvill use them for their restorations and currently there are (I think) seven Esprits in the shop being worked on. Can't praise Nick and his team enough. They've been fantastic to work with on this project. And it's not been quick, or easy (apparently fitting air con to a non air con Esprit is a bit of a job - who knew?). The engine, incidentally, is an 'everything on the menu, please' LotusBits rebuild. You name it, LotusBits threw it in. The money - I'm all at sea about whether to reveal the cost, suffice to say, it's 6 figures and a whole lot more than any S2 is worth, or is likely to be worth anytime soon. But, that isn't the issue for me - it's my car, for me. So, in five weeks time (as I am away until early August), the car will be ready for the road, and I am superly turbo excited. I attach a montage of pictures from throughout the build (because pictures, right?) and would appreciate your thoughts (noting that it's too late to change anything, and I wouldn't anyway). Awe. Some.
    1 point
  29. Indeed, though I still believe the sales numbers have more to do with lack of promotion than the quality and ability of the cars. The market didn’t want a fizzy brown soft drink either, they had to be persuaded.
    1 point
  30. Have to agree I have the same problem. Surprised they don't fit one. Our S2 Elise had a foot rest for the passenger.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. I have decided to get rid of the 'crash pad' that runs along the dash on the passenger side. Its not present on the UK S1's and so presume it was some sort of USA safety requirement. Its pretty heavy and substantial, so yet more 'adding lightness"! Ill need to redo the glove box and make it bigger. However that's no hardship seeing as at some time in the distant past someone has used an old carboard box!
    1 point
  33. First rule of sales, when selling red ones, swear blind red ones are the best, even if the earlier blue ones were better.. he's never going to admit Porsche have gone backwards.. I guess that most 911 customers don't care, they just want something recognisable by their peer group - what it actually drives like is irrelevant. If they drove the Evora back to back with the 911, it might make them think twice, but only if they can appreciate what the Evora does very well. If their friends don't recognise an Evora as a luxury sports car, it won't work for most 911 owners. I think the latest 911 is the best looking 911, possibly Porsche have stopped hitting their designs with the ugly stick, or rather they save the ugly stick for their hideous SUVs. The 911 was even nearly as nicely made as my Golf R.. But I digress, the point is, once you have tried an Evora, you are ruined, I was constantly testing cars to see if there was something better, given that it looked possible Lotus would vanish. Glad to say I am back in an Evora.. heaven..
    1 point
  34. @Lotusfab just remember it could be worse - it could be a V8 .....
    1 point
  35. Yeah Andy I just went for it in the end. Will still be good to catch up and see your wing mirrors in particular as that’s one modification I would consider 😎
    1 point
  36. I knew you’d break! congratulations buddy, so happy for you and you won’t regret it one bit! There is a “430 club” thread so time to introduce this gorgeous example.
    1 point
  37. Bibs has changed the title for me, hopefully that’s a bit more search friendly now. Thanks Bibs😀👍🏼
    1 point
  38. I've only ever had the misfortune to have to remove a broken stud twice. The first time I used a stud extractor and that broke off inside the stud which made things even worse as they're as hard as hell. And the second time I MIG welded a nut on the top of the broken stud and wound it out with a spanner. That seemed to work well as the heat from the welder helped break the bond and it came out quite easily. I'm hoping I never have to do another!!
    1 point
  39. Congratulations, a fine choice. Totally agree with your reasoning. Marketed properly, Lotus could still sell a lot of Elises as they offer a uniquely rewarding driving experience. Unlike a 911 Turbo which feels half asleep until past 160mph, it’s a fast car you can enjoy at all speeds - that really could really catch on one day. ‘Fun at fifty’ was one of the engineering targets for the original Elise. It completely delivered on that and the current Elises continue to do so. So much so I think they are fun at 40mph! Somehow it’s a quality shared by all the current Lotus range, if not all the Lotus cars made to date. Just one point of many that I think Lotus should make more widely understood now they have the resources to do so.
    1 point
  40. Cracking car, drove it the other week - really nice example! Enjoy!
    1 point
  41. Thanks for sharing ..... excellent guide 👍
    1 point
  42. Not relevant to this thread.. Just a cool photo I found... Not my car.. But looks amazing and it is winter photo !! Hope you enjoy !! (moved from 'Serious Trouble V8' topic)
    1 point
  43. So I thought I’d update this as I work through all the issues...hopefully it will be useful to someone👍🏼 So first things first, I needed a new battery and picked up an Exide Excell half price (result!) from a local motor factors that is closing down as the old owner is retiring. But when I went to fit it, the positive battery terminal clamp disintegrated as I tightened it. I have diagnosed the problem as premature metal fatigue due to being made from Cheesium. You may want to check your terminals next time you poke around in there, as these things are crap. So I went back to the motor factors and local Halfrauds and local EuroCarParts, but nobody had the right shape terminals I needed with upright M8 connection posts. Then I found these on Amazon: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B07C3YH4QP/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1 Did you know the positive terminal is 19mm diameter and the negative 17mm?! I didn’t, it made for a confusing search at first, as I initially thought “why can’t I just find a pair the same size?!” Well they’re deliberately not the same size for (now to me) blindingly obvious reasons. Perfect, once the main connection has been positioned and tightened, the wing nut makes removal and attachment of cables a doddle. I tighten them as hard as I can by hand then a little 1/8th of a turn nip up with an adjustable spanner across the 2 wings. And that’s the battery fitted complete with Ctek connection point👍🏼 Next step, sorting the manual boot release cable...
    1 point
  44. Here's some sound advice for free: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N44icPfGi1M Still want to do it? Then write your bloodtype in fireretardent thread on the belt of your racing suit and buy a corvette for that purpose and enjoy When you are done with that, go get the keys for the Esprit and take a drive on twisty back roads, not a straight freeway, and show the corvette how propper driving is done, with no sparks and flames. That's when the real fun begins. Kind regards, Jacques
    1 point
  45. That's a great way to snap 5th gear off! Exactly the conditions required to break the gearbox!
    1 point
  46. Be careful with theories - many folks have had those. In practice and the cold hard reality of the real world - they are often using a dust pan and brush to collect rods and pistons off the road
    1 point
  47. Updated pics with new friend😍
    1 point
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