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  1. Time will tell how reliable the velcro is @drdoom. It is stiched on so glue failure shouldn't be a problem. Anyway, after nearly two years and two months off the road the Esprit has finally broken cover. Still plenty to do before its ready for an MOT, but its a big milestone having it in a drivable condition again While idling on the driveway it kept stalling and it took me a while to realise it was due to be a lack of fuel. The weird thing was the low fuel warning light wasn't on and I know that works because it was illuminated before I put fuel back into it for the first time a couple of weeks ago. Obviously not that reliable at indicating low fuel I guess 😕
    6 points
  2. Started up the S1 for the first time yesterday. Clutch seized on! What do you do? My method warm the engine up in neutral. Turn it off. Select reverse gear. Start in reverse with a lot of room behind. Push in the clutch and brake, job done! , Second issue the brake lights stopped working. The most likely reason is the switch on the pedal box. You have to take the drivers seat out unless you can squeeze upside down under the steering wheel and reach the switch on top of the pedal box. Then there are several possibilities. The switch needs adjusting, its broken, the wires have come off or the fuse is blown. You can short the wires and the lights should come on. If they don’t the fault is elsewhere. I found my switch was intermittent. The contact gets damaged due to the high current running through it due to the two brake light bulbs. Incidentally I have seen other posts on here saying the switch rotates out of adjustment. Remember there should be a locking nut on the switch, so this should not be possible. Solution to burned contacts, fit a relay or switch to LED bulbs that use less current.
    4 points
  3. No stamp from me! I'm what the IT trade would call a 'User Expert' (in fact I'm sure we used to call them know-it-all meddlers). I agree wholeheartedly with @Escape that the service history may not tell the whole story. A good inspection from someone who knows the cars is the best option. And NOT AA or RAC as they (generally) just don't know enough about the Esprit.
    4 points
  4. I'd put that differently: a well cared for car is a must (unless you are willing and able to work or pay to fix inevitable issues). I, like many on here, do all the work on my cars myself and never bother with the service history. I don't know if @Sparky puts a stamp in every time he works on a car, but we all know all those cars have received all the expert attention they need. On the flip side, I know of 'classic car professionals' who never fail to add a stamp but don't bother putting the correct oil in... @GreenGoddess good luck with you search! I suggest you go and find one to sit in and possibly drive (either at a dealer or from a friendly member). You'll know straight away if it's for you or not. Filip
    4 points
  5. Test fit done, hardware's arrived, booked in on the 25th with Robin at RJM bodyworks, quite exciting 😁
    4 points
  6. When I took the dashboard out I realised just how bad its cover was. The leather was in really poor condition with lots of splits and as dry as paper. I did contemplate just putting it back in the car as it was and refurbishing it when I tackled the rest of the interior, but since it was such a fight to remove I thought I would avoid that pain twice, and re-cover it whilst it was out. I may yet regret this decision, as it means I will be doing other (dirty) jobs with a new dashboard cover. I looked around at where I could get the dashboard re-covered, or who sells new covers and in the end decided to go with a cover from J-F Customs on ebay (https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/BLACK-STITCHING-DASH-DASHBOARD-REAL-LEATHER-COVER-FITS-LOTUS-ELITE-ECLAT-S1). I had read some reviews on their products – some were complimentary, and some were not, however when I contacted them to ask for some information and leather samples they were very prompt to respond and very professional. I started by dismantling the dashboard into its component parts. The glove box and instrument pods were already separate as they need to be removed to extract the dashboard from the car, but I also had to take apart the glove box door and base. Next I had to remove the old cover, identifying which sections had foam underneath, and which didn’t. Through trial and error I worked out that the best way to remove the old cover is with a combination of just ripping it off, and using a flexible paint scraper on the sections that remain. The cover was very securely glued on, and getting both it, and the foam layer off was slow work. For the foam I also experimented with thinners hoping to soften the glue, and it did speed things up a little, but not as much as I hoped. I then cleaned up the fibreglass surface, removing as much of the residual glue as I could and sanding it down. I also put some new glass fibre on the back of the dashboard in a few places where it was split or cracked, filling the cracks on the front. The glove box base is metal, so that got the rust removed and a coat of hydrate 80. In the mean time I had ordered the new cover in dark grey as I think a change to the interior colour is called for (to go along with the partial interior I picked up in light grey leather a while back). This arrived about a week after ordering – pretty prompt I thought. As delivered the main cover itself gives the impression of being a floppy spidery thing – it seems to have arms and legs. Of course that is because the dashboard is a cross shape, with the centre console, and the two arms out to each door. It did make me realise that fitting it could be a challenge. I started fitting the small pieces first, and to be honest they were not as difficult as I expected, even the glove box and instrument pod. I would that spreading contact adhesive on part of the cover and dashboard at a time, then waiting and doing another small section was the best approach. I started by gluing the stitching line to the fibreglass and getting that straight, then gluing the outer side of the cover on, then finally the inner side meant that I didn’t end up with glue in places I didn’t want it. I did have a couple of issues with the cover set though. The steering column cowl cover is supplied in one piece, but my cowl is in two pieces. I messaged the vendor to ask about this, and they very quickly came back saying that their pattern was taken off a car with a single piece cowl (an Eclat I presume, whereas I have an early Excel). Their response was good though – send them my cowl and they would re-make the cover to fit. So that is what I did, and about 10 days later they returned the cowl with the new cover already fitted - at no charge. The other area I had problems with was the drivers side ‘arm’ of the main dashboard. The cut out for the ignition key is in slightly the wrong place (too far towards the steering column), and also the leather seemed to be twisted at the join to the centre console piece – no matter how I arranged things I have not been able to get this area flat and straight. This is visible in the car, however it is mostly covered by the instrument panel. My car was missing the 'filler'pieces between the dashboard and windscreen, so I made some up from scratch using 10mm closed cell foam, with 5mm scrim, and then covered in leather. These are squishy enough to be pressed into the gap left by the windscreen. To finish things off I replaced the 'wood veneer' (actually sticky back plastic/vinyl wrap) with new. I thought that for the £2.50 cost if it looked tacky I can do something nicer later. The leather of the cover itself feels very good quality, and the stitching is very well done. I suspect that the issues I have seen are a result of the pattern coming from an Eclat, and my car being an early excel. I think if I was to do this again I would offer to take my dashboard to them to use to check the patterns. The only problem now is that it really shows up the rest of the interior! Well, its a lotus so that actually isnt the only problem. A bigger problem is that whilst testing my wiring with the ignition on the smell of fuel became very strong. I traced that down to a fuel pump that was leaving more fuel in the boot than in the engine!
    3 points
  7. RIP Murray. Mr F1. Here are some of his famous “Murrayisms” Unless I am very much mistaken.... I AM very much mistaken!" "Mansell is slowing down, taking it easy. Oh no he isn't IT'S A LAP RECORD." "This is an interesting circuit, because it has inclines. And not just up, but down as well." "The lead car is absolutely unique, except for the one behind it which is identical." "The most important part of the car is the nut that holds the wheel." "I know it's an old cliche, but you can cut the atmosphere with a cricket stump." "Tambay's hopes, which were nil before, are absolutely zero now." "And there's no damage to the car. Except to the car itself." "That's the first time he had started from the front row in a Grand Prix, having done so in Canada earlier this year." "Here in Malaysia, it doesn't rain here by the bucketful, it rains by the ocean." "How you can crash into a wall without it being there in the first place is beyond me!" "Excuse me while I interrupt myself" "And the first five places are filled by five different cars." "And Damon Hill is following Damon Hill." "Michael Schumacher is leading Michael Schumacher." "Jean Alesi is 4th and 5th." "Villeneuve is now twelve seconds ahead of Villeneuve." "Frentzen is taking, er, reducing that gap between himself and Frentzen." "This has been a great season for Nelson Piquet, as he is now known, and always has been." "It's lap 26 of 58, which unless I'm very much mistaken is half way." "I'm ready to stop my start watch." "Only a few more laps to go and then the action will begin. Unless this is the action, which it is!" "I can't imagine what kind of problem Senna has. I imagine it must be some sort of grip problem." "He's obviously gone in for a pit stop. I say obviously, because I cannot see anything." "And the first three cars are all Escorts, which isn't surprising as this is an all Escort race." "He is exactly 10 seconds ahead, or more approximately, 9.86 seconds." "Look up there! That's the sky!" "There's nothing wrong with his car except that it's on fire." "I don't want to tempt fate but Damon Hill is now only half a lap from his first Grand Prix win and… and HE'S SLOWING DOWN, DAMON HILL IS SLOWING DOWN… HE'S... HE'S STOPPED!" "As you look at the first four, the significant thing is that Alboreto is fifth." "He's the only man on the track, except for his car." "You might think that's not cricket, and it's not. It's motor racing." "And Michael Schumacher is actually in a very good position. He is in last place." "One light, two lights, three lights, four laps, five lights, go, go, go!" "That's history. I say history because it happened in the past." "There are a lot of IFs in Formula One, in fact IF is Formula One backwards!" "Anything happens in Grand Prix racing, and it usually does." 👏👏👏
    3 points
  8. Thought I'd post experience and a couple of pictures of my recent project to repair a common problem on Full leather interiors in the Excel. First attempt was to try feeding the leather and see if any compliance could return - A couple of weeks later I gave up on this plan, deciding only long term fix was to set a couple of panels in. Mid Process : And the end result : All in all, very pleased with how it's worked out. Tony
    3 points
  9. Exige 410 - after remap 471hp, 514Nm https://www.facebook.com/VoneRacingValence/posts/3136396586401549 Exige 430 - after remap 497hp, 484Nm https://www.facebook.com/VoneRacingValence/posts/4050397425001456 A member on G111 forum has been to Vone (they are Lotus specialist for many years... yes, they exist next to KT. Seems like my comments are not too much appreciated here!!) with his 430 cup, Komotec air intake, 2bular manifolds, no cat.: 504hp, 534Nm. (you'll need to register: http://garage111.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=22&t=9818&start=810) Let the flaming begin (again).
    2 points
  10. In that case it would have to be on ebay with a buy it now of 50p, in the same way Tim of Car SOS had his esprit sold.
    2 points
  11. Having now successfully fitted and tested my oil temperature gauge in replacement of the dashboard clock on my S4s I thought I would share the necessary steps in one place for anyone else that wants to do it. There are several ways you can do this modification, but I’ve documented what I felt what the cheapest approach. The wiring modifications have been done without butchering the original loom so that the clock could be restored should I want to in the future. You could cut into the loom and solder things together if you want to reduce the cost further, but I personally think that is a false economy. What you need to do the modification 52mm oil temperature gauge and matching sensor with M10 thread I used a Lotus branded VDO gauge A082N6067F. It seems there are two different styles of face used on the VDO oil temperature gauge with both using the same part number, I went for a secondhand one dated from 1989 because it looked like it matched the rest of the CAI gauges already in the car more closely The required Lotus sensor part number is A082N6068F x1 red 286 bulb if you want the gauge illumination to match the rest of the gauges M10 sensor T-piece. I used this one from Merlin Motorsport: https://www.merlinmotorsport.co.uk/p/oil-pressure-gauge-t-piece-m10-x-1-mse050m Wiring – You can used any 1mm thin wall colour you like, but the lengths and colours below follow the colours Lotus use in the wiring diagram. Yellow/Black – about 100cm Black – about 10cm Green – about 20cm Connectors/crimps – The items in bold are required to connect into the existing loom wiring, the others are specific for connection to the VDO gauge and may vary if you use a different gauge and sensor. x1 Econoseal male connector terminal (926981-2) - https://cpc.farnell.com/amp-te-connectivity/926981-2/crimp-pin-econoseal-0-5-1mm/dp/CN13393 x1 Econoseal green wire weatherproofing seal (281934-4) - https://cpc.farnell.com/amp-te-connectivity/281934-4/wire-seal-green/dp/CN13747 x1 Lucas Rists male connector terminal. I have been unable to find a part number, let alone a source of these, so I bought a section of dashboard loom from a breaker and robbed a terminal and length of wire out of that. I have plenty of spare crimps left so if anyone wants one to do this drop me a DM and I’ll happily chuck one in the post for you to save buying a whole loom. x3 6.3mm female spade connector crimp and insulation boot for making the connections to the back of the gauge x1 4.8mm female piggyback spade connector crimp and insulation boot x1 4.8mm male spade connector crimp and insulation boot. x2 2.8mm female spade connector crimps WITHOUT insulation boot for modifying the gauge illumination circuit 501 bulb conversion loom Engine bay sensors and wiring changes 1. Disconnect the battery 2. Remove the starter motor to gain access to the existing oil pressure sensors. 3. Disconnect and remove the oil pressure sensor transducer and low pressure warning switch. The transducer shown below is wrong and so you shoudn't find all the adapters fitted that I had if the OE transducer is fitted. 4. Install the sensor T-piece into the port on the right where the oil pressure gauge transducer was removed and install the oil pressure transducer, low pressure switch and temperature sensor as shown using thread sealer on all the threads. In my case I had to orient the side port on the T-piece at the 6 o’clock position, however if you are running an electric charge cooler pump I think it would be better to orient that port at the 12 o’clock position because there is more space there. With the pressure switch at the 6 o'clock position it will *just* clear the starter, but it is very tight. I also used a 10mm copper washer on the low pressure switch because otherwise it was partially obscuring the flow of oil to the pressure transducer. The copper washers aren't required on the transducer shown here if using the OE transducer. 5. Under the coolant header tank locate the round three pin connector for the oil sensor sub harness (shown disconnected in this photo), disconnect it and remove the sub harness from the car. There should be three wires going into one side of the connector (main body loom side) and only two on the other side (sub harness side). 6. Remove the nylon balnking pin from the back of the round three way connector on the sub harness. Remove the wire seal from the hole if it doesn’t come out with the nylon blanking pin. 7. Fit the Econoseal terminal and green weather seal to the yellow/black wire and fit it into the unused way on the connector 8. Now take the loom back to the car and plug it back in and cut the yellow/black wire to the desired length to reach the oil temperature sensor 9. Remove the sub harness again and feed the wiring into the protective tubing and then fit a 6.3mm female spade crimp and insulation boot to the loose end. You’ll need to cut a small slot in the insulation boot so it can fit on to the sensor. 12. Return the sub harness to the car and wire it into the three oil sensors as follows and re-fit the starter motor. Yellow/Black = oil temperature Brown/White = low oil pressure switch White/Brown = oil pressure gauge transducer Gauge installation and binnacle wiring alterations These steps may vary depending upon whether you use the VDO gauge as I did or an alternative. The steps should be largely the same but the types of connector used could be different. 1. Remove the dashboard binnacle cover 2. Remove the bulb holder and purple and black wires from the back of the clock. The purple wire is a permanent live for the clock to retain time and we won’t need this for the oil temperature gauge so tape this out of the way safely to prevent it shorting on anything. 3. Remove the clock from the dashboard and install the oil temperature gauge in its place 4. Take the remains of the Yellow/Black wire and cut about a 30cm length and fit the male Lucas Rists connector terminal to one end and a 6.3mm female spade connector terminal and insulation boot to the other end 5. Install the rists connector in the smaller of the two large harness adapters in the binnacle in the position shown and connect the other end to the terminal labelled ‘G’ on the back of the VDO gauge. You'll need to slide the yellow strain relief clip off the connector to install the terminal. 6. To connect power to the gauge take a 20cm length of green wire and fit the 4.8mm piggyback crimp and insulation boot on one end and a 6.3mm female spade crimp and insulation boot on the other end. 7. Remove the green supply wire from the boost gauge and connect the piggy back connector to the boost gauge and reconnect the supply to the boost gauge. Connect the other end of the piggyback wire to the ‘+’ connector on the back of the VDO gauge. 8. To connect the earth to the gauge you’ll need to make up a little adapter loom because the VDO gauges use a 6.3mm spade connection and the loom has a smaller 4.8mm connection to fit the standard CAI gauge. I used a 10cm length of black wire with a 4.8mm male spade connector and boot on one end and a 6.3mm female connector with boot on the other end. Plug this into the earth disconnected from the clock and plug the other end in the ‘-‘ connections on the back of the VDO gauge. 9. Finally to sort the illumination take the 501 harness adapter and crimp a 2.8mm female spade connectors onto each of the wires on the harness adapter and plug it into the bulb holder on the VDO gauge and plug the other end into the original bulb holder that you removed from the clock. 10. With everything wired in you should have an arrangement that resembles this You should now now be able to reconnect the battery and test that your oil temperature gauge works as expected. It will probably take about five to ten minutes of running before the gauge registers any oil temperature.
    2 points
  12. Oh, nooooo! Sorry, not a fan of the colour coded louvres.
    2 points
  13. That’s a shame. I’ve gone the other way from hot hatch to Evora, and have absolutely no regrets! To get my hot hatch fix, my wife’s family hauler will be on the chopping block instead...
    2 points
  14. The Evora 400 manual also describes that the switch needs some lube... Brake Switch Plunger Lubrication Conditions within the pedal box environment could over time cause the brake light switch plunger to stick, which under certain conditions could cause the ABS brake light warning tell tale to illuminate. To prevent this a small quantity of RS 494- 124 silicone grease should be applied to the switch plunger as shown in the RH illustrations and procedure listed below: A. Apply the equivalent of a ‘pin head’ amount of silicone grease to either side of the plunger at the base of the switch body and evenly distribute along the complete length of the shaft. B. Fully actuate the plunger so that it travels inwards into the switch body so that the silicone grease lubricates the internals of the switch mechanism. Silicone grease should be applied if fitting a new service replacement brake light switch, but if carrying out this procedure to the existing switch in-situ, ensure the plunger is fully extended by depressing the brake pedal and use the application nozzle supplied to accurately apply the grease*. Care point: Ensure that silicone grease has not spilt onto any of the pedal pads, as a precaution cover the pedal pads prior to carrying out this procedure. Check and clean the pedal pads as necessary after completing this procedure. *Only RS 494-124 silicone grease should be used for this procedure, other silicone greases may cause damage to the internal electrical components of the switch. RS 494-124 silicone grease is readily available in 100g tubes and can be sourced locally.
    2 points
  15. Towards the end of last year, I mentioned that my brother’s Maserati Ghibli SS had completed its latest renovation. Anyway, he finally drove it home from the workshop today and here are some photos. It was originally supplied via Bristol Street Motors, Birmingham and I think is 1 of 8 RHD manual SS coupes. It was ordered in this colour with power steering, Powrlok limited slip differential and air-conditioning. The engine is a dry sump all alloy quad cam 4.9 litre V8 developing 335 bhp. The interior is original and hasn’t been restored. I think he paid <£30k when he bought it about 20 years ago. It’s now worth rather more.
    1 point
  16. Yes mentioned it was going to be up for sale on my Facebook page and over the 4 months waiting it got picked up sad to see it go . looking forward in finding a 400 .
    1 point
  17. I will contact them and ask if they have any distributor in Spain, if not, is not too far from where I live ( more or less 10 hours)
    1 point
  18. Congratulations on the selling of the NA Eddie never seen it advertised anywhere and good luck on your hunt for a 400. The dip in prices over the last year as for sure made them in my opinion a bargain buy at the moment and there will probably be no better time to get into a 400, used values will for sure stabilise now production as come to end. Looking forward to seeing your new car when you find the one that is right for you 👍
    1 point
  19. Thanks for letting me know, I was not aware of their existence at all
    1 point
  20. Arguably...yes Personally I still don’t see 20 bhp justifying 1600 eur at all, more bhp ... maybe but not 20
    1 point
  21. Depends what you are looking for. The Lotus ECU is encoded. So you're paying for the time it took to decode it - no, it didn't just take an hour or two! You're paying for the expertise in, and quality of, the tune coding. But most of all your paying for the fact that that these are cars built in small numbers, so you just don't get the volume sales to be able to sell stuff like this cheap.
    1 point
  22. Well done chap - that’s a proper milestone
    1 point
  23. I replaced mine with springs and hessian
    1 point
  24. I used edpm roofing rubber to make a new diaphragm for my Discovery after the original one failed and I found myself as good as sitting on the floor 😆. It's hand as I have offcuts from work and it can be layered up using rubber contact adhesive.
    1 point
  25. So if you call the dealers and they sold their allocations then they will just try to up sell you to the only model available. The Evija 😂
    1 point
  26. I agree, black is better here.
    1 point
  27. Well one of your opinions had to be wrong sometime @C8RKH!
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. “there isn't a single mark on it, inside or out.” Then why wouldn’t you clean it before taking the photos??!? 🤦‍♂️
    1 point
  30. That is the way to do it @r3nault. 'Er indoors now has a Swift Sport... she did have a RS200 Clio but it never saw more than 4000rpm so was rather wasteful of the 200 horses. At 11 years old and prices firm, it seemed best to let someone else enjoy it. The Swift ain't a patch on the Renault but good enough for the money. Justin
    1 point
  31. Here you go: This is the underside one of my leather seats. As you can see it needs a new rubber diaphragm. Let us know if you find something suitable! I had planned to use "insert" rubber sheeting. Pete
    1 point
  32. Hi Eddie Setting my car aside for one second, probably worth seeing a red leather interior in person. All dealer photos are set to over expose the colours - the photos of the car that was on collecting cars was a case in point. It’s nowhere near as bright in person. I sat in both a black interior and a red leather one and the black made the interior overall very dark and a little depressing hence choosing red. Red alcantara is different again. Hope that helps with your search. Greg
    1 point
  33. She must be deaf, too.
    1 point
  34. NO they are too short for the rears on the cars with 285 tyres (Lotus fitted a 3mm spacer to the back of the wheel so these are too short by 3mm)
    1 point
  35. 1 point
  36. Hi Dudes, glad all is well (apart from your leaking snatch Paul, I think there's an ointment for it but it must be applied externally, with a caulking gun!!!) I am feeling a lot Pfizier since my jab, it'll be 3 weeks next Wednesday,already feeling invincible. I had no side effects of note, just a sore arm for a bit. It was the biggest day out for ages, I never thought I'd get excited about a trip to the holiday Inn, Winchester. I did a spot of work with Ricardo once up in Warwick I think, they were really twitchy about security (I think they were doing F1 gearboxes at the time) had loads of screens and chaperone to the loos, all I remember from the meeting now was it was a death by NDAs, to be fair I think we were worse than them. Funnily enough that had something to do with Landrovers, if I say anymore I will have to kill you!!! 😉 Gave the garage a bit of spring clean, so drove the elise but only to the other side of the garage, amazed it started to be honest, but everything seemed to work. Actually thinking about it I have driven 2 Lotus. I'd like to spend a bit of time on the elise, hopefully the garage will warm up a bit soon its a bit f**ing cold in there. Hopefully its not going to be too long before we can all meet up again in person and get out in the Lotus in some nice weather, but it does feel a bit like a distant dream at the moment. In the meantime stay safe and as sane as one can manage, you know what they say "Be good, and if you can't be good, then don't get caught"
    1 point
  37. I've been struggling to find anyone who I feel comfortable to send my old ECM off for repair with and in a timely manner. I've not done an exhaustive search yet, but I've taken a risk and bought another ECM from the states; I might dust of my electronics skills in due course and look at my original myself. This time I've stayed away from Cardone branded refurbished units since evidence would seem to suggest they're not reliable and gone for an AC Delco Professional branded one which has a 24 month and 24,000 mile warranty on it and will actually work out cheaper than the Cardone one I bought previously, once I've returned the faulty Cardone unit to them to reclaim the exchange surcharge. They're probably all refurbished at that same place I expect 😆 Before I even plugged it into the car I checked the ECM section of the manual and identified all the connections on the ECM that relate to the QDMs and then set about methodically checking continuity of all the associated wiring and tested all the relays, solenoids and resistors etc just to be sure it wasn't something on the car that killed the last replacement. Luckily everything was fine, although I did discover that Lotus have wired up several of the relay operating contacts in the rear fuse box the reverse of how it's shown in the wiring diagrams 🤦‍♂️ It doesn't affect the running of the car, but did cause some brief head scratching when I was tracing the wiring through with the diagrams. The ECM is now installed and the car has been run up and all seems to be well, the idle is a LOT better although moments after I recorded the video below it did have a couple of wobbles where the idle almost dropped to the point of stalling before the ECM caught it. Something I'll look at another day. After that brief five minute run I whipped out the plugs and turned the engine to 30 degrees BTDC to check the belt tension again, as per the manual's guidance following the belt change and the measurement came back as 98Hz. Its a little on the low side, but I don't think 2Hz is going to make enough of a difference to warrant doing anything about it! I then ground out all the knackered rivnuts for the undertray and replaced them with new. A couple had to go up a size to M8 because the hole in the body had opened up. Undertray was then slipped on. Some of the bolts are missing because I ran out while fitting it, so I've got extras on order 🙄 I also sorted out the chassis protection near the Alunox as recommended to me by several people earlier in the thread. I managed to find some nice heat resistance material with velcro on it that was the perfect size to wrap around the chassis tubes. A metre length was perfect to do what you see here Finally I ran the car again to start bleeding the coolant system and while I was doing that the oil temperature gauge started to work, so I know that modification works
    1 point
  38. Well that was quick! Grandado-ordered TPMS arrived this morning. Exactly the same as all the other versions. 9 days to get here from China, cannot argue with that!
    1 point
  39. I wonder if it might be that Lotus use Toyota's 3 cylinder turbo engine (256bhp) from the GR Yaris in the base model 131? - very light weight and enough power for base model.
    1 point
  40. I'm way too young to be having a jab yet but waiting patiently and optimistically booking holidays for later on in the year. Been driving the Esprit loads to work and my weekly brewery trip, even gave it a wash a couple of weeks ago. First wash since about August last year! I have to shout at people about wine next Wednesday but will join you if I finish early enough. @pbharcourthow leaky is your snatch? Curious if the younger models make less of a mess?
    1 point
  41. Far better tom get a good regularly used car that has had all the maintenance completed. A garage queen with very low miles and low service history due to low mileage an be far worse than a good used one. Common issues being belts not changed, perished bushes and brake hose. Corroded coolant pipes and radiators for example. Good luck, I hope you find your prefect match.
    1 point
  42. Hello from Germany Osku Your steering looks great! Perfect choice! I have just purchased an ´82 very early´83 model like yours in a darker blue with gold trim and beige / gold velour /leather all original and as far as I can tell so far absolutely spectatcular original condition. I viewed it purchased it but unfortunately its not here yet. I will pick it up with a tow truck next week hope to get all the MOT tests paper works ready soonish to get in on the streets asap! Osku can you confirm that on our models the steering rack is 36 spline 17.5 mm? Maybe I´d like to source a momo hub and have a little fun with a different steering wheel. I was eyeing this cheapo dished rallye style and stash the original nicely away to protect it from unecessary deterioration due to my angst sweaty hands under heavy driving 😉. Best Zeb
    1 point
  43. So, the LED light boards are in. The pics aren't great I'm afraid, but I'll take some better ones once me and car are reunited. First pic is of just the rear light (30%) (which lights further under braking). Second pic is with the fog and indicators (100%). It becomes clear at this point, just how bright the LEDs are. What isn't shown is reverse and brake. When I get the car back, I'll upload some more pics. Suffice to say that I am really pleased with the look and the improved visibility. Supercool. (missing my car and driving and stuff, big time)
    1 point
  44. Hi Chris thank you for warning, I have installed Cohen submersible hoses. cheers Ruud.
    1 point
  45. A short update that covered a huge amount of work, all of Saturday pretty much. Some extra work due to the fact that I use the car to store stripped items inside itself due to space limitations and this all needed to be moved around! However, probably the most progress I’ve ever made in one day ever!! Needed to remove the last steering knuckle and was ready to go.... Car is now in further bits, body has been off at least once before this. Chassis is actually so good it would have been ok to just strip the suspension assemblies right back (these are in remarkable condition) and sort these and the engine I expect. But the car was so well progressed in terms of the strip down, it made sense to just go the extra mile and lift the body shell. There were also some bolts missing that held the thing together so it’s better I can at least reassemble the car and make it better than before. Stuff like brake lines were protected in armour plastic which has also helped. I’d love to know who did the work last time, but no history unfortunately! In a complete reversal to other cars I’ve had, the visible bits such as brakes and hubs look like they’ve been underwater for 5 years but the top parts of the hidden chassis are still resplendent in their red paint. The foam tunnel lining had turned to dust but some had been stuck on the chassis top. More space around the chassis means I can stop tinkering on menial tasks and start the mechanicals now. The dolly has also lifted the body so I can access the sills to get to all the rivets and start to get the last paint off each of the panels ready for paint. Fridge was kindly providing a huge amount of help on the count down to the lifting process via messaging service so huge thanks to him for this! I’ve also had calls with other posters for their guidance on various aspects and have really appreciated the advice I’ve had, so thanks to everyone for this, as it’s still hugely daunting to me to be this deep into a 1:1 airfix kit..... I may have asked this before but need to start to investigate properly now - the lower front box section is properly pounded in with jack marks. With it being folded steel, what is the correct process to lift these 2 overlaps, repair then reform the box? Rest of the chassis looks fine, not even sure if it was a later replacement as the tubes near the exhaust manifold, although wrapped, seem to have no damage. I may use a specialist but I can actually carry the chassis anywhere on my roof rack so in a few weeks, I’m hoping to have this away to the right firm for blasting, repair and priming in advance of painting back at home. I can see where the current paint has been compromised and I’ll layer paint up in these areas for next time.... One last snag below was the throttle cable that was jammed in it carrier, that and the front suspension bolt upper were the only very minor snags on the actual lift. The bolt I got around by lifting that corner on a jack under the sill and pulling the body gently backwards to clear, then lifting it further and leaving it resting......
    1 point
  46. These are only mobile phone images, so the wide angle lens gives a kind of distorted image with regards to proportions, I.e. lengthened.
    1 point
  47. Oh yes I know that feeling all too well ! TBH I also get a collection of stares and looks from the public on and off the road , some are funny , some a sense of wow but then you also get the real jealousy , envious and how dare you drive that car you must be a drug dealer or involved in crime ???? overall in my Evora bubble I am at peace with what I have worked hard to obtain 😀😌😇
    1 point
  48. Had a good play with the dash today, came up with a little fix for the indicators being out of sight for tall people
    1 point
  49. Hi, I just bought my V6 S in january. I live relatively close to Vienna. I am looking for shop to do regular service and also planning Nitron / Ohlins + power upgrade in the future. I know that Komotec is popular option, but its 9hrs of driving one way for me, which can be done once for install of the kit, but I found Jubu performance which is 2hrs of driving for me, so it can be the place where I can do the regular service also. https://www.jubu-performance.com/de/lotus/exige/mk3_toyota_v6/leistungskits-262 Does anyone have personal experience with them? thanks pic for attention, my daily vs my weekend toy
    1 point
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