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Showing content with the highest reputation on 22/06/21 in all areas

  1. Today I have driven the two back-to-back on the very same road (B-Road, twist and turns, straights.., no autobahn). I don’t care about prestige or what others think. I just judge how it drives, brakes, turns etc. smiles per miles and can I drive it all day on mountain roads, B-roads, etc. without a headache.. Car Lotus Evora S, IPS, 2012 Porsche Cayman GTS, manual 2021 Tyres Michelin PS4S Michelin PS4S Brakes AP Racing No ceramics, normal GTS Brakes Suspension Setup Standart Sport + Fahrwerk normal Exhaust Sport Sport and closed Personal note: watched a view videos for preparation… these youtubers and tester… What the f… are they talking about?? Long gearing a major problem? Tsss, forget that. The gearing is fine. Need that ceramic brakes? Yeah right… But did anyone said, that the GTS sound in the cabin is louder and more tiring? Nope.. That the suspension even in normal mode is harder than the Evoras and lacks the finesse of the double-wishbone? Nope.. ;-) So ok here are my findings and opinion: The Cayman is a very very good car, put together nicely. I think it is the best road going Porsche one can buy today. Engine and manual gear change are excellent. Best I have ever experienced. Suspension is very good, grip is top, road holding excellent. It lacks the finesse of the Evoras double-wishbone, but it certainly gets the job done. Brakes are very good, similar to the AP Racing. Sound in the cabin is louder and way more tiring than in the Evora, but probably similar than the 400/410. Is it better for my purpose than my 2012 Evora? Short answer: No, but certainly a close call. The way the Evora drives, brakes and sounds is for me just better or equal to Cayman in the areas where it counts for me.. The Evora S has just the right level of noice, feel and finesse. Would I buy a Cayman GTS? Short answer: Yes, it’s on my short list.. You can buy a sensational engine and manual gear change with similar (but not the same) drive pleasure. More liveable than the Evora, top quality interior. So if the Emira somehow does not deliver or float my boat it is good to now, there is an alternative. A very good alternative… Final note: when I was driving away from the dealer, did I miss the GTS? Nope. The Evora is just a very nice place to be in and drive… so yeah felt a bit like cheating driving a Porsche.. Guess my wife is right, I’m a honest Lotus man ;-) Cheers!
    8 points
  2. A GT430 & 718 GT4 Comparison (First Impressions) Specifications Porsche Cayman 718 GT4 Clubsport (2021) Kerb Weight: 1495kg Power: 414 bhp; 420nm torque (20-25 bhp can be added by higher flow aftermarket exhaust swop) Top speed: 189mph 0-62: 4.4 secs Lotus Evora GT430 (2018) Kerb Weight: 1299kg Power: 430 bhp; 440nm torque Top speed: 190mph 0-62: 3.8 secs As mentioned previously I offered to share some initial impressions around the Cayman 718 GT4 when directly compared to the Evora GT430. My comments on the GT4 are based on 500+ miles of mixed road driving over the past 10 days, including plenty of B road blasting in good weather. The GT4 is still in the run-in period prior to the 1k mile point, so there’s been no major strain placed on the 4L flat six so far. I have had the pleasure to own my GT430 for the past 2 years and during that time I have put over 4K miles on the clock, tracking the car and long-distance touring with it across Scotland & Ireland. I try hard to avoid ‘garage queening’ and ensure cars owned get driven at every available opportunity. To apply some objectivity, I’ve key headed first impressions as follows: Engine. On cold starting the GT4 literally sounds like a bag of spanner’s is being dropped into the sump, which is a little disconcerting. But there again all you need to do is get in, depress the clutch and turn a rather smart electronic key! However, when warmed up there is an immediate linear response when you accelerate. It obviously feels like a quick car but you have to press on to get to the sweet spot at around 6-7k revs. The engine sound in the updated 718 GT4 is a little disappointing compared to the previous version; largely due to the flat 6 being strangled by the recently introduced EU regulated big cats & OPF filters in the stock exhaust system. The resulting noise has nowhere near the sense of theatre you get with the Evora, which is absolutely epic, even compared with the big bore super car exotics…. I’ve already been advised by those ‘in the Pork know’ to look at Akrapovic or a similar quality aftermarket back box to let the scream out and also release some more power. Inevitably quality aftermarket stuff for Porsche GT cars seems to have at least one extra 0 added to every price. Also, there will be warranty issues so that will have to wait for now. Brakes. The carbon ceramic brakes are absolutely mega; light touch and progressive feel. They are an expensive option (£5.7k) & are probably an unnecessary over-engineered indulgence on a road car like the GT4. But they definitely look the part and there’s no brake dust! However, in reality the AP Racing steel brakes on the Evora are just as effective and also save a fair amount of weight. Overall, I would call it an even match in the braking department. Steering. The GT4 is very precise (991.2 GT3 front end in the 718 GT4) and electric assisted. The steering wheel is a simple tactile tool and completely clear of anything bar the horn. However, in comparison it is not quite as sharp, or capable of giving as much road feel as the GT430’s hydro assisted system. The GT430 and Lotus in general definitely provides the benchmark in this crucial area! Gearbox. The Porsche GT shifter layout is outstanding. It is a proper close ratio box, a really short shift, & the pedal size & positioning significantly reduces the margin for error when shifting fast. However, the GT4 gearing is very long (up to 80 mph is possible in 2nd gear), which many Porsche fanboys don’t like. But it just means less changing up and much greater use of 2nd & 3rd to maximise the flat six engine’s sweet spot. It is perhaps easier to use than the particularly good, but heavier feeling shift in the Evora. There is not a great deal in it to be fair and the GT430 definitely does not suffer from the long gear ratios found in the GT4. Suspension. Chassis balance and cornering feel at speed is excellent. The GT4 is very neutral with a just a little under steer and very predictable turn-in. It is both easy and enjoyable to drive at speed. The GT430 with the Ohlins at road settings is brilliant at sucking up everything thrown at it on B roads, but it’s a track-oriented system and it takes more concentration around reading the road to avoid crashing over bumps. Both cars are low slung. A front splitter scrape alert needs to be applied equally. The GT4 comes with smart 20” rims all round and like the GT430 is fitted with Cup2 Tyres. So, there is mega grip when they are warmed up in fine dry weather, but dodgy as f—k when it is cold and wet. Cabin Ergonomics. The 918 carbon bucket seats not only look great but are extremely comfortable. By direct comparison they are far better than the Exige style carbon buckets in the 410 & 430. For a start they have height & tilt adjustment. The recline angle and lumbar support is excellent on longer journeys, no matter what size you are (I am 6’2” & 15 stone). The Mrs actually went to sleep in the passenger seat for over an hour on the drive back to N. Ireland, which was great; (plus no fingernails constantly in the dashboard). She has never managed to even get a little drowsy in the GT430. The GT4’s driving ergonomics, dials, key information, multimedia system etc. has the same layout as the GT3. Frankly, it is brilliant and it’s all streets ahead of the GT430 and I haven’t even mentioned cupholders! Ease of access, getting in/out is similar for both cars. Perhaps the Emira will move this aspect up to a significantly better level. It will need to because Porsche have absolutely nailed performance car ergonomics with their GT cars in my view. Build Quality. The overall GT4 build quality is excellent, no leaking door rubber or uneven panel gaps. Although the mass produced composite plastic splitter, front intake parts & diffuser have nowhere near the quality, or the visual appeal of the high-grade carbon parts on the GT430. The GT4 has a particularly low silhouette & centre of gravity, this is especially noticeable at the back of the car, (no tall V6 over the back axle), but it is strange and unusual to not have direct access to the engine bay. It takes about 5-10 minutes removing trim and panels to get at the GT4 lump. Storage. There’s real German ingenuity on display over storage. There is a serious amount of practical storage space at front and back of the car. Literally every inch of space in the car is used effectively. The GT4 edges out the 2:0 configured GT430 in terms of luggage capacity. This makes it a very practical touring car for 2 people. General Impressions. Non car people generally look at Porsche offerings as “grown up” cars. That said, because they are everywhere and look very similar to the uninitiated, the GT4 definitely does not draw as much attention as the Evora. As a first time Porsche owner I’ve discovered a number of ownership idiosyncrasies. It literally feels like you are joining a cult where you are expected to be pay for absolutely everything (and be grateful for the privilege)! Decent options will add at least £25k to the base price when ordering GT cars. Also servicing costs are extremely high. As an example, even activating the inbuilt tracker with vodaphone is double what you pay for a private contract with the same company. That said to date my local Porsche dealer in Belfast has been extremely efficient, proactive and helpful thus far. Even though the car was not purchased from them. The Porsche dealer network & wider ecosystem is mature and substantial in my neck of the woods. Regrettably Lotus no longer have a dealer or authorised maintenance facility anywhere in Ireland. If I need to get anything done to the 430 in future, it entails an expensive 8 hour round trip across the Irish Sea to Parks in Scotland. Track performance & utility. TBC in a future update. I suspect the 200kg weight differential, a little more power & the Ohlins dampers will give the GT430 a definite advantage on track; particularly with longer more open circuits. But there’s probably not so much in it on short, technical circuits. Price comparisons. Fully specced with all the sexy options the GT4 comes in at around £100k. The GT430 was around £113-120k when new depending on spec. GT4 resale values are extremely healthy for now. GT430 residuals are getting better and its rarity should help in the longer term. Finally, I’ve had a lot of fun already in a very short time in the GT4, but there’s absolutely no way that I’d part with the 430. For me, the GT430, like the Exige 430 Cup & the Elise Cup 260 represents a pinnacle in the now dated pre-Geely Lotus hard core “for the driver on road or track, all day long, keep it simple with basic creature comforts” approach. For the small but enthusiastic niche of petroleum driven purists it was great to be part of that heritage while it lasted. That said I fully understand that Lotus as a business needs to move on sharply in order to be commercially competitive on a global level. I hope that in a similar vein to Porsche they continue to find a way to cater for niche enthusiasts by building exciting track-oriented cars. I hope that all this comment does not sound, or come across as pompous. It is not a case of going over to the dark side! Obviously this is just a first impression being in the fortunate position of being able to drive two similar in approach, epic to drive, but still quite different cars. 😎
    7 points
  3. Now back on the mountain roads.. took a day off 😉 For the driver.. for sure!
    5 points
  4. Chances are that Lotus could be back onto the front of the Norwich City Football Club shirt as principal sponsers for next season. Norwich City to announce Lotus as sponsor for EPL season | Eastern Daily Press (edp24.co.uk)
    3 points
  5. Meet Teddy- it’s true what they say “they are man’s best friend”.
    3 points
  6. My two Collies, Lady & Stri. Both mad and way too intelligent.
    3 points
  7. I'm going to keep stum as last time I mentioned about "old" cars with very low mileage I was basically told told to stfu as the car would be fine to to just drive off and blast lol... Great car, but if it was me, I'd be also checking the air con system (another potential £2k bill as it if it is not used it ain't lubricated is my understanding). I'd rather spend £30k on a car that had done 20-35k miles and was well sorted to be honest, but I know many people like to buy a low mileage car and just look at it and polish it to keep it low mileage.
    3 points
  8. Knowing that he was drinking merlot in the sun
    3 points
  9. Home at last. I'm pleased to say that the new bearings have zero play in them. Well worth the expense. Now time for a geo check.
    2 points
  10. I mentioned last time that there was a mystery coolant leak. Since then, as promised, I’ve been braving successively longer trips — including one out on to a tidal salt marsh, as you do, to take pictures. Here’s my latest video that tells that story. Spoiler alert: I won’t be asking for my TLF subscription to be refunded 😉
    2 points
  11. Now expecting a post by @C8RKH in this thread a few months on, along the lines of : Had a really annoying noise in my VX, had to strip out most of the interior just to be able to put a bolt in.
    2 points
  12. Finishing my shift at 4 this morning and having to find something to scrape the ice off the windscreen before I could head home, . 1 degree C - you're 'avin' a larf!
    2 points
  13. @GFWilliamsI misspoke because I just took another look at mine. They are bolted to the subframe. I have also attached the PDF for the support slots. Later, Eldon Cup R rear wing upright slot info.pdf
    2 points
  14. It's great Andy. Sitting outside, still in daylight with a Belhaven special at 11,45 pm.
    2 points
  15. No it was meant to make you lot unhappy!
    2 points
  16. That was a great read Jimmy, thanks for your initial impressions. I briefly contemplated a GT4, but after chatting senselessly with the dealer for over an hour (I wanted a test drive) he didnt seem to want to sell me product! No offer of a test drive. Considering he knew I was coming from an Audi R8 it was rather strange. I had already driven a GT410 and had gotten to know the friendly local Lotus dealership staff, together with the long calendar of events they organise for owners each year, it was a no brainer. I have since gotten to know a 981 GT4 owner reasonably well. I dont think he is quite enamoured with his car. Me? Absolutely smitten with my GT430 Sport. As you say, the noise, the steering, the handling. There is nothing like it for the money.
    2 points
  17. Goodwood just announced FOS is go!! New COVID regs so check their site but all ticket holders are confirmed to be able to attend 😊👏🏻👏🏻🎉
    2 points
  18. I have 3 of them, 1 is in my 1984 Turbo. Definitely a good piece for my USA car that has shitty timing and lots of emissions junk. I got the car with the top end of the engine apart after a timing belt failure. Almost all of the emissions stuff had been cut out over time, so once together it would run just OK. The 123 lets you plot your own advance curve and if you want to back down timing when on the boost, that is easily programmable as well. A very easy install and I love it. I have one in my 1966 Porsche and my 1972 Alfa GTV too. The bluetooth model allows you to lock out the ignition as an inti theft device. I have that on the porsche.
    2 points
  19. Looks like our new girl has been accepted into 'the family', .
    2 points
  20. This has been in our family since the early 1990s. I had it for a couple of years 20 years ago. It’s now back at my brother’s after 15 years of tinkering at a workshop, whose proprietor died recently. I think it will be my brother’s next restoration project to finish it.
    1 point
  21. Every single night - he has to be right by the side of the bed. The two girls are happy in their beds - but he has to be within touching distance. He’s such a tit but he is lush.
    1 point
  22. I remember THAT bolt very well.😂😂 There is a knack to getting it out & back in again, but unfortunately I can’t remember what it is 🤔
    1 point
  23. Why would you change the clutch on a car that has only done 6k miles as a "precaution" for the next owner. That's £3-4k of cost, on a £30k car you are about to sell. Sorry, that just does not add up to me. Looks like the car spent a long time on Jersey, with it's max 40mph speed limit crawling along. Maybe that is why the clutch needed a precautionary change? Stunning car. Great spec. But...
    1 point
  24. Looking at my VX in the garage! I've ripped all the interior out (if I ever meet the guy from Lotus who decided to put that bolt where he did for the front passenger seat I swear I will rant at him for hours! 45 minutes and umpteen tools to get ONE FRIGGIN' BOLT out. It must have been a guy who designed it, because no woman is that bloody stupid! However, all the interior trim (door pads, door outer and inner cards, gearbox shroud, cup holder (my vx has cupholder where my Evora has none - 20 years or progress I guess), both seats, and steering column upper and lower shroud and instrument binnacle) is out and at the Trimmers. I hope my next post on this topic will be in the "what made you happy" thread but I'll be buggered if that front pax seat bolt is going back in!!!
    1 point
  25. https://automotiveauctions.co.uk/index.php?option=com_bidding&view=infinite&layout=details&id=1132&fbclid=IwAR11f3UyBo6XJZkXqZC2lBoR47HAH3b4LD5CVsJQUiLbISU-JeFWUyWN4k0 Very low miles, will be interesting to see how much it fetches.
    1 point
  26. EEK, semi-finals of the Euros 21 - Kick off at 8.00PM !! Better be before that! Now - the most perfect evening is starting to take shape: 7.00PM = Emira launch - Champagne 8.00PM - 10.00PM = England win the Euros - More Champagne 10.00PM Plus = Forum - Much celebration and back patting - More Champagne 😃 Ha, fair enough.. To be fair.. My money would be much happier on Italy winning than England. I don't really think we have much chance. Good luck anyway. Also, ha, I also prefer Prosecco BUT with a Disaronno top!! It is called an 'Italian Kiss' and it is bloody strong but lovely. 😁
    1 point
  27. The press launch (which will be live streamed by Lotus and TLF) is on the 6th in the early evening.
    1 point
  28. I believe the 6th was mentioned, yes. No point doing it at Goodwood as the world won't all be there. I hope. Maybe a teaser of the exhaust pipes. So , yes, sleepless nights and even more dripping with excitement once we turn that corner... Ade: Excuse me, where is the Lotus stand with their new car on? Steward: 500 yards down there and then turn right and you can't miss the loud, throbbing, baying crowd, whistling and mexican waves. Follow the leaving trail of saliva. Ade: Ah right. Blimey. Thanks. Steward. Ah, also, sorry, watch out for the fighting mate. Ade: Hey? what do you mean? Steward: Their is some sort of massive fight between Evora and Cayman owners.
    1 point
  29. Might have been a combination of a crappy road and my lack of experience with a really raw car with instant responses. I have perhaps been sanitised by too much tech and cossetting. Either way, I recall the EXPERIENCE which was bloody epic and I miss that part of it. At the time, I thought it was effin mad but now.... I kinda want that. haha. I was told at launch we will have full prices and specs available on the Emira. I wish I had expanded on this. I wonder if that also includes paint options, accessories, etc. Ooh, how about a fully working configurator!!?! I can see myself playing on that for hours. I think if I can price up the whole car with everything I want then all is cool with me.
    1 point
  30. Litmnus test: if a GT3 was the same price as my Exige 410 Sport, and i was looking for a 'toy' to broaden my smile on local roads, I'd but the Exige. In fact, I'd even pay a bit more for my Exige. I piloted a GT3 RS a couple of times and it was superb. But it wasn't more fun than my Exige. I'd take a 991.2 GT3 Touring as a daily though... that is the thinking man's porsche who is more interested in impressing himself than others.
    1 point
  31. Thanks to Baptiste, I now have one lovely pair of SSC seat brackets which I'll be fitting and me and Mrs R will be trying out. Depending on how that goes, may need to find a second pair! It's always good when a wanted coincides with someone who wants to sell something! And it even managed to make the journey from France to England despite both Covid and Brexit! Cheers Graham
    1 point
  32. @blindside really enjoyed reading that Jimmy. No hint of "pompousness" to be honest and I thought it came across as a balanced, informative view. No doubt as the miles get put on the car we'll hear more about how it compares to the GT430. Happy driving...
    1 point
  33. Hi Bibbs, Many thanks for the comment. Nice Evora in your cover picture. As a result of my post on other sites I have now found 4 of the 21. 3 blue (inc. mine) and one red.
    1 point
  34. Very objective and informative ready Jimmy, thanks for sharing
    1 point
  35. 2021 Goodwood Festival of Speed to go ahead at full capacity
    1 point
  36. Hi TRCM , thanks , yep I get that from the previous posts and the seloc wiki "fix" and Ken's above but but that's just the ducting from the footwell into the recirc system. What I'm trying to get to the bottom of is how the outside air gets into the duct in the first place without resorting to endoscope cameras n stuff.... I don't like fixing problems with work around if I can find the source.... Trouble with being an aerospace engineer.
    1 point
  37. Are you sure it is a sleeve and not just excessive liquid gasket that has oozed into the bolt hole?
    1 point
  38. 'Linford' just passed his MOT 😀
    1 point
  39. Without question the modern generation simply don’t know how good they’ve got it. Literally the only thing they have to worry about is what gender they want to be.
    1 point
  40. I have a S1 Evora with quickjacks. how is it that you are able to lift the front end without a cross brace?
    1 point
  41. This year, the Elite has suffered greatly from while-you're-in-there-itus. What started as a single rear wheel bearing and hub carrier replacement has turned into bearings on both sides, hub carriers on both sides, rebuilt half-shafts, replaced trailing arm bushings and various suspension hardware, rebuilt diff, rebuilt propshaft, and replaced fuel line with more modern (read: thicker) hose. While it's still a work in progress, I just finished the fuel line; and, holy cow, that was a job. It would have been dead simple had the transmission and exhaust been removed, but with both in place, access to important bits was incredibly limited. Add to that the fact that I can't get the car very high off the ground and you've got a recipe for frustratingly difficult jobs that would otherwise be simple. The job took close to 3 days, so today's entry will be exclusively about that 17-18' of rubber hose routed through the chassis. Quick backstory: My previous entry mentioned how a home renovation was getting in the way of car work, and that I had a car show coming up at the end of last month. That car show was delayed until August (due to COVID), and I had a bit of a medical issue that sidelined me for 3 weeks, so neither the house nor the car is done, but at least I didn't miss the show. Back to fuel line... The original (OE) line was clear (well, brown now) polyurethane (I think?). 46+ year old plastic that is now soaking in some non-zero amount of ethanol. Considering I had the diff out of the car, and the propshaft simply slides out, I was never going to be closer to the fuel line through the backbone, so I thought now was the time. I ordered 20' of new Earl's Performance 5/16" ID fuel line (I believe the OE line is metric, but 5/16" was very much close enough), a new filter, and fuel-line hose clamps. The lot was surprisingly expensive - well over $100. I probably paid more for the name than those hose, but, oh well, such is life. The previous owner replaced the fuel pump, which is only a few years old, so no need to replace it. Original fuel line and filter (both of which may have been fitted at the factory): The OE fuel line has an OD of around 3/8", but the new line has an OD of 9/16". This poses a problem as the line is routed through the backbone - going through two bulkheads (for lack of a better term), two reinforcement plates, the rear suspension upper crossmember, and the body under the fuel lank. All of those holes needed to be widened and grommeted. The line also passes through three loop-clamps and two spring clamps - all of which were too small for the new hose. Finally, the OE line is connected to the tank via compression fitting (like what you'd find in a water line that goes to your fridge), the sleeve for which was too small for the new line. OE compression fitting under the tank: Having cataloged what I was up against, I started by removing and draining the tank. As has been the case through most of this resto, I am very lucky with the condition of the equipment. No rust to speak of, and everything came out easily. The tank is held in by two 17mm bolts in the trunk area, the nuts for which live just above the suspension towers - accessible through the wheel well. If you've got long arms, it's a one-person job to get a wrench on one side and a socket on the other. After disconnecting the tank from its mount, getting the filler pipes off posed a bit of a challenge. Man-handling them got the job done. I don't think there's a subtle way of doing it... just lots of pulling a swearing. With the filler caps off, I siphoned most of the fuel out of the tank through one of the filler openings. Lucky for the me, the tank had about 6 gallons of fuel, because I only had a 5 gallon container. With a gallon or so of fuel left in the tank, I was able to turn it on its back to access the underside without spilling anything. Top tip: cover the filler openings, lest you suffocate on fumes. With access to the underside of the tank, I came to the first obstacle - the compression fitting. As with many things, I made this more complicated than it needed to be. What I didn't realize is that the compression sleeve is a male-end thread that threads into the banjo assembly. To change it to a barbed fitting (that would accept the new fuel line) simply involved screwing a barbed fitting into the banjo assembly. Easy-peasy. To make matters better, we had a spare barb sitting idle in one of the parts cars for the race car, so I brought it home, and after a little cleanup, had a suitable fuel pickup: After a smattering of Permatex Aviation Form-a-Gasket, it was ready to go. Next up was enlarging and adding new grommets to the chassis pass-throughs. I initially ordered a grommet kit from Amazon - 125 grommets of various sizes for about $10. Of course, when I got them, none of them were the correct size, and, after seeing them, I wondered about their ability to survive in a hot, oily environment. I then went to our trusty McMaster Carr where I found every type and size of grommet known to man. I ordered grommets in three thicknesses - one set for the front/rear tunnel bulkheads which are around 1/8" thick, one set for the upper rear crossmember which is about 1/16" thick, and one set for the body which is about 1/4" thick. I got 5 of each, and each set of 5 was around $10. Go figure. Enlarging the holes caused much pain. I figured a stepped drill bit was the right tool, but how do you get it between the chassis and transmission? Well... there exists "quick-change" drill bits that have a hexagonal shank... nuts are also hexagonal. That means that you can put a quick-change drill bit in a socket at the end of a socket extension; so with a socket adaptor for a drill, you've got a bit that can sit any distance away from the drill. It's sloppy, but it works. In the end, going long wasn't as good as making a 90 degree turn, but there's a solution for that as well. It looks like this: Those front and rear tunnel bulkheads are fiarly thick, so it took quite a while to get through them with this setup, but after some patience, we had a newer, larger pass-through for the new line (the new hole is below center-right): Same setup was used for the rear bulkhead (above center-left): ... and again for the remaining two holes. With that, I was ready to send fuel line through. I decided to start at the front and work my way back, as going through the tunnel would be the most difficult part, so I wanted to start with that. The line starts at a loop through the block right next to the bell housing, then along the chassis rail, through a loop clamp, and then the front bulkhead. I lubed the hose with silicone lubricant (didn't want to use oil on rubber, though I suppose fuel line should be able to handle it) and sent it through. When everything's slippery, there's not much too it. Ignoring the spring clips for now, I went to pass through the two reinforcement plates near the back of the tunnel. The OE line was clipped between the two plates and simply passed through the half-circles cut in those plates at the top of the tunnel. The new line, however, was large enough that it was in constant contact with those plates, which are about 1/16" thick - thin enough to cause concern for cutting. The recesses cut in the plates were not the right shape or size to accommodate a grommet, and there was no way of getting a drill to the front of the two plates to enlarge the hole for a grommet. I thought that the biggest issue with running the line through those recesses was the possibility of the plates cutting their way through the rubber, so eliminating that possibility was top priority. After a bit of head-scratching I came up with what I hope is a reasonable solution: I made two 1/16" plates look like one 3" tunnel with no sharp edges by cutting a piece of metal to shape, then flaring the ends to hold it in place: Only one end is flared in the above pic, but the other would be flared in-situ. Because there's a large surface area between the chassis and hose, I believe that vibration wear will be minimal, and there's no longer a cutting edge against the line so.... job done. (installed picture below). If this trips anyone's safety alarm, feel free to speak up. Running the rest of the line was a non-issue. Through the crossmember, through the body, and the line is now run.... but wait, there's more! The OE line was also held in place by 2 spring clips and 3 loop clamps. One of the spring clips was made unnecessary by the half-tunnel above, and the loop clamps were simply replaced by larger rubberized versions I also found at McMaster. The spring clamp in the center of the tunnel, however... that one was a challenge. Firstly, that clamp is darn near inaccessible. I am not a small person - 6' 5" - with long arms. I could *just* reach it with my finger tips by reaching down the tunnel from the rear - though not well enough to do much while in there. There is, however, a 3"x6" access hole at the front of the tunnel on the underside - just above the exhaust pipe. With an exhaust hanger removed, while pulling the exhaust to one side, I can *just* get my arm up there (with a scraped and scabbed-over arm to prove it), but again, not so much that I could do much with the clamp. I tried various ways of getting the new line in the clamp, but was unsuccessful. On my last "all or nothing" try, I broke the clamp. If there were small children around, I should apologize, as the streak of foul language that came audibly pouring from my mouth was ... well... impressive. I sat under the car staring through that little access hole for some time before coming up with a solution: the left-over clip-on nuts that I got for the front bumper project would clip onto the parking brake relief in the chassis, assuming I could drill a hole in the chassis for a bolt to pass through. Enter drill bit extension #2! ... and after a bit of fiddling, a new clamp was in place, albeit 4-5" further forward than the old one: (this will eventually get some paint to cover the bare metal scratches) With that, the new hose is run. What an absolute pain that could be incredibly easy under better conditions. It should be noted that I haven't tested this yet. It's possible it may all have to come out again. Time will tell. ... and now it's time for some housework. We also have our first endurance race at the end of the month (also in an Elite), so I suspect it will be mid to late June before this Elite is back on the road.
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  42. +1 I've found this place and its community a great help! (note to self hurry up and sign up for the Gold FFM)
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  43. love threads that end in *FIXED* great forum, everyone jumps in to help ..
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  44. **FIXED** Thanks for all the help. I’ll make a personal note not to reassemble in the dark! In case it helps someone else. The TB related codes were cured by gently moving the spades on the TB to improve the connection in the plug. The misfire was caused because the breather hose on the back of the TB had come off where it goes onto the actuator. All fine now with no misfire, starting trouble or stalling at junctions!
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