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#84

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About #84

  • Rank
    LO
  • Birthday 25/11/1973

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  • Name
    Andreas Möller
  • Car
    Lotus Evora S -11
  • Location
    Helsingborg

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  1. Interesting with the Kelford offering, but they are obviously referring to turbocharged installations. Have any of those cam profiles been used in any SC engine builds? They look like decent upgrades, but again, you work differently with cams for TC's vs. SC's.
  2. I am quite sure I read in another thread, here or on LotusTalk, that the exhaust cam differs from Toyota original. But, if I read on the MWR site, they state the same OEM lift/duration for the Toyota vehicle's 2GR-FE as they do for Lotus. Other than that I agree about what you say. I find it remarkable that also after market tuning cam's for the supercharged engines keep the same specifications for intake and exhaust. Especially as I understand there are more to gain in porting the exhaust than the intake port.
  3. You can alos check with Track Group who builds the Cosworth spec GLA/GLB engines. However, I understand it as they change to solid lash adjusters - which is fine until until you need to adjust the valve clearance and have the TVS1900 covering one cylinderbank What I find interesting is that MWR claims their 50 % stiffer springs to be good for 7700 rpm and that you would need Ti valves and solid lash adjusters to run safely at 8000 rpm. Jubu Performance, on the other side, offers 30 % stiffer springs which they claim are good up to 8000 rpm, even with 13,5 mm lift. It is not easy to be a
  4. I have a bunch of redundant heat shields after my 2bular exhaust system was mounted some years ago. Since the one on the front exhaust manifold has a hose leading the hot air up to the ventilation I am thinking that it actually might help to lower the engine bay temperature. Now, it is not that easy to even test if it fits, so therefore the question: Does the original front exhaust manifold heat shield fit on a 2bular type of exhaust manifold with any reasonable modification? Pictures?
  5. I did the opposite, went for Aluminum screws with big rounded head for minimized drag and weight Sorry, not in English, but you get the principle: https://www.carbix.se/product.html/aluminiumskruv-kullrig
  6. I do not think the Camry tune will exceed the fuel flow the pump can provide, but I wouldn't go very high in boost with such an arrangement. Maybe a progressive fuel pressure regulator could cure it, or limit the boost by adjusting the recirculation valve setting. Like one can do with the waste gate on a turbo charger, same principle. If you know someone with a wide band lambda sensor, I would use that during a test ride.
  7. Ok, if you are only after a pure conversion, the only thing you have to change is the fuel pump, for two reasons. It is not specified for E85 and is then likely to fail. Secondly, it is rated 140 L/h and if you use Deatschwerks' online guide, you need 175 L/h to safely supply the standard 350 hp. I actually became a bit curious about what there is on the market right now and found a Swedish company "eFlexFuel" who have plug and play solutions for the Evora NA and the 4-cyl Exige. A kit is 399 €! Not that bad. I guess they have partners in other countries, given that their webpage is partl
  8. Forget the original ECU. Cheapest and maybe easiest is to use a piggy back ECU with built in flex fuel functionality. I was looking at Greddy, or AEM, (don't remember) two years ago, but went for the ECU Master EMU Black. ECU + wire loom is quite a bit more money (4x) than piggy back unit, but given that the standalone ECU works, then it is much more plug and play. With the piggy back, you need to tap into the original ECU wires, or contacts, by your own. If you search internet for "E85 piggy back", then you find a lot of alternatives. By doing so, you keep all the original ECU functionality.
  9. Interesting with the Redline Shockproof. I went a similar, but different, route using the Mobil Mobilube 1 SHC 75W-90 with Lindemann TA transmission additive. http://www.lindemann.dk/industrial-products/ta-manual-gearbox-differential-treatment-with-teflon/ It is frequently used in motorsport by people around here and the difference in transmission losses can clearly be seen on the dyno. Anyhow, I experienced the well documented loss of synchromesh functionality on trackdays with the standard gearbox oil, especially going to 3:rd, but so far I haven't experienced any tendencies yet af
  10. The actual front section is 51 vs 60 mm and the rear section, after the 2-1 junction, it is 63,5 vs 76 mm. Both differ by about 40 %, but I would assume it is the front section that affects the note / pitch of the sound most since it affects the accoustic tuning and pulse damping the most.
  11. I have searched for information about the factory setting of the cam phasers, the VVT system, but failed completely. What I found was that the total variation is 35 degrees, which I understand refers to +/- 17,5 degrees since they also refer to 50 % duty cycle in the solenoid valve as the center value. Can anyone possibly share details about the real valve timing for various speeds of the 2GR-FE, particularly in the Evora S?
  12. As soon as the ECU Master EMU Black is sorted out for my Evora S and I am sure it will pass an OBD check, I will do the swap. The EMU black is prepared for it, I already have a DW65c fuel pump and a set of 775 cc injectors waiting to be fitted. E85 is a good match with a non charge cooled setup.
  13. So, do you know how the exhaust cam timing changes vs rpm for the original ECU? I do not know.
  14. The suppliers of these upgrades claims you can handle the 66 and 67 mm upgrades with the original ECU map. If you look in the compressor diagram, the increased supercharger speed doesn't affect the efficiency much, not until you go to the 62 mm, or smaller, wheel and approach the rev limiter. You actually gain some efficiency at slightly higher boost, which compensates for some of the extra load. Theoretically the temperature increase at max rpm is only 7 °C, not accounted for the additional 4 hp the engine need to produce to drive the supercharger.
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