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jimbo2

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About jimbo2

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  • Name
    Jim Palmer
  • Car
    Elise
  1. send all 4 back to Nitron to be rebuilt - probably cheaper & certainly better than buying 2 new ones.
  2. Advice on brakes depends on what you use the car for. Some general rules are: Discs – For road use genuine Lotus discs are OK but I like Ultimax Turbo discs (EliseParts, made by EBC?) I’ve achieved an amazing 40,000 miles on the rear including lots of track days. I’m not a fan of drilled discs (apart from cracking, they only improve cooling if you routinely clean out the holes which is quite tedious). AP racing or Performance Friction floating discs are obviously the ultimate but not needed unless you are racing seriously. Pads. Always bed in new pads (and fit new pads if fitting new discs). The usual method is to find quiet roads a few miles from home, brake from 60-70mph firmly at c. 50% maximum, drive c. 1 mile to let everything cool, repeat at 75% maximum, repeat, now brake at 95% and drive home slowly trying not to use the brakes. Park in gear with the handbrake off. Pad options – lots of personal preference & I’ve tried most. For road use genuine Lotus pads are OK. An excellent compromise for working from cold on road & being good on track with good feel & bite is Carbone Lorraine RC5+. Performance Friction are even better but need a firm initial application. My opinion of EBC pads is not really printable. Mintex are very hard on discs & produce lots of brake dust. Pagid are excellent but noisy & wooden on road, so really only to be recommended for track work. Calipers. The standard calipers are fine & well balanced, especially the rears with a powerful handbrake – sticking cables are common but easy to change. Fitting adjustable brake bias isn’t necessary & just gives another variable to add to the confusion. Brake fade & disc warping. Even for a pure road car use braided hoses, racing brake fluid (ATE blue racing brake fluid or similar), & change it every 1 – 2 years General rules for looking after your brakes on track days include: Always do a cooling down lap at the end of a track session, medium speed, minimum use of brakes. Park in gear with the handbrake off & let the car roll slightly on stopping so the pads release properly. If you can be bothered, roll the car a foot every 5 minutes until the brakes have fully cooled. Braking later and firmer than you would on the road reduces heat build up – braking gentler & longer is not good on track. As ever this is my personal opinion but based on tens of thousands of track miles.
  3. " I know the company that make the castings for AP" - the castings are only the start for good discs. They then need to be machined, heat treated and most importantly, surface ground to achieve the correct "grain" in the metal - and that's not cheap.
  4. Advice on brakes depends on what you use the car for. Some general rules are: Discs – For road use genuine Lotus pads are OK but I like Ultimax Turbo discs (EliseParts, made by EBC?) I’ve achieved an amazing 40,000 miles on the rear including lots of track days. I’m not a fan of drilled discs (apart from cracking, they only improve cooling if you routinely clean out the holes which is quite tedious). AP racing or Performance Friction floating discs are obviously the ultimate but not needed unless you are racing seriously. Pads. Always bed in new pads (and fit new pads if fitting new discs). The usual method is to find quiet roads a few miles from home, brake from 60-70mph firmly at c. 50% maximum, drive c. 1 mile to let everything cool, repeat at 75% maximum, repeat, now brake at 95% and drive home slowly trying not to use the brakes. Park in gear with the handbrake off. Pad options – lots of personal preference & I’ve tried most. For road use genuine Lotus pads are OK. An excellent compromise for working from cold on road & being good on track with good feel & bite is Carbone Lorraine RC5+. Performance Friction are even better but need a firm initial application. My opinion of EBC pads is not really printable. Mintex are very hard on discs & produce lots of brake dust. Pagid are excellent but noisy & wooden on road, so really only to be recommended for track work. Calipers. The standard calipers are fine & well balanced, especially the rears with a powerful handbrake – sticking cables are common but easy to change. Fitting adjustable brake bias isn’t necessary & just gives another variable to add to the confusion. Brake fade & disc warping. Even for a pure road car use braided hoses, racing brake fluid (ATE blue racing brake fluid or similar), & change it every 1 – 2 years. General rules for looking after your brakes on track days include: Always do a cooling down lap at the end of session, medium speed, minimum use of brakes. Park in gear with the handbrake off & let the car roll slightly on stopping so the pads release properly. If you can be bothered, roll the car a foot every 5 minutes until the brakes have fully cooled. Braking later and firmer than you would on the road reduces heat build up – braking gentler & longer is not good on track. As ever this is my personal opinion but based on tens of thousands of track miles. Al the best, Jim
  5. Brake fade & disc warping. General rules for looking after your brakes on track days include: Always do a cooling down lap at the end of session, medium speed, minimum use of brakes. Park in gear with the handbrake off & let the car roll slightly on stopping so the pads release properly. If you can be bothered, roll the car a foot every 5 minutes until the brakes have fully cooled. Braking later and firmer than you would on the road reduces heat build up – breaking gentler & longer is not good on track. Discs – AP racing are obviously the ultimate but I have just replaced Ultimax Turbo rear discs (EliseParts) on my S1 after an amazing 40,000 miles including lots of track days. I’m not a fan of drilled discs (apart from cracking, they only improve cooling if you routinely clean out the holes which is quite tedious). Pads – lots of personal preference & I’ve tried most. An excellent compromise for working from cold on road & being good on track with good feel & bite is Carbone Lorraine RC5+. And bed any pads in properly. My opinion of EBC pads is not really printable. Mintex are very hard on discs & lots of brake dust. Pagid are excellent but noisy & hard. Calipers. The standard calipers are fine & well balanced, especially the rears with a powerful handbrake – sticking cables are common but easy to change. Fitting adjustable brake bias isn’t necessary & just gives another variable to add to the confusion. As ever this is my personal opinion but based on tens of thousands of track miles.
  6. I use Toyo T1R - a new pair of fronts arriving today from http://www.event-tyres.co.uk/ £61.80 each fitted at your home or work. I've used Yokos and would say they are superior but not at the price difference and prone to wearing the shoulders causing tramlining. Don't fit Toyo PX4, they are not designed or suitable for our cars and not made in the rear sizes. oops - mised that! I normally buy 888s from Camskill but local tyre fitters charge £20/tyre for fitting so went with event tyres for inclusive home fitting and disposal of old tyres.
  7. I fitted Nitrons, probably the best suspension I've ever used but expensive. I still have the Gaz adjustable coil overs I took off - contact me if you are interested.
  8. When I bought my Elise S1 it had aftermarket fully adjustable dampers set to full hard, and the ride height at race spec. - maybe OK for driving on a billiard table but not good for the usual B roads I use. First I had the ride height raised to 115/120 (standard is 130/130) and the geometry to standard road spec. (if the car is lowered fit steering rack raising plates to reduce bump steer - a very cheap and effective modification). Also have the corner weights set by someone who really knows what they are doing. I tried every combination of damper settings but couldn’t find a comfortable road setting so eventually I lashed out and fitted Nitron Single Adjustable units + Eibach springs. What a difference! Compliant at all settings and still drivable on full soft (most adjustables seem to be undrivable below 1/3 hard) and still comfortable on road at 10 clicks out of 22. On track they are simply superb without rattling your fillings. Simply the best dampers I have ever used, even better than Bilsteins. Hope this helps.
  9. To http://www.thelotusforums.com/forums/topic/37108-advise/ Dec 2011 These are my experiences of S1 Elise handling – the principles are the same for the S2 etc. Tyres – stick to Lotus approved roads tyres – forget track day & ½ way tyres. Tyre pressures are very important. Start by setting them cold to the manufactures pressures - always use your own tyre pressure gauge – some of the most accurate are the traditional “pencil” type; avoid cheap digital gauges - my favourite is a round dial gauge with a rubber hose and bleed nipple. I’ve experimented over the years with various rear engined cars and found that lowering the rear pressures (try 2psi at a time) reduces throttle-on understeer and made the car more stable. (this is the opposite of most tyre guides). The difference is in throttle response, power can be applied much earlier and with a lot more confidence. You will find the pressures increasing considerably when hot, and I set pressures to be as near as possible to my preferences when hot. On the road I use 23/25 hot (book 23/27 cold) which means slightly different cold pressures summer and winter. Geometry is also very important and needs to be checked regularly – the Hunter computerised laser alignment system is one of the best. http://www.alignmycar.co.uk will find a local place with a Hunter alignment system who will provide a setup sheet showing castor, camber and toe for typically £35.00. The variable is quality of the operator and believe me it can vary a lot – I’ve had mine set up by 4 different people and have now leaned how to check it for myself! There’s good data from Lotus in the workshop manual (available as a PDF on line) and recommendations on SELOC etc. When I bought the car it had aftermarket fully adjustable dampers set to full hard, and the ride height at race spec. - maybe OK for driving on a billiard table but not good for the usual B roads I use. First I had the ride height raised to 115/120 (standard is 130/130) and the geometry to standard road spec. (if the car is lowered fit steering rack raising plates to reduce bump steer - a very cheap and effective modification). Also have the corner weights set by someone who really knows what they are doing. I tried every combination of damper settings but couldn’t find a comfortable road setting so eventually I lashed out and fitted Nitron Single Adjustable units + Eibach springs. What a difference! Compliant at all settings and still drivable on full soft (most adjustables seem to be undrivable below 1/3 hard) and still comfortable on road at 10 clicks out of 22. On track they are simply superb without rattling your fillings. I do a lot (pardon the pun) of track days but apart from sticking to standard geo settings if you only use it on the road, the same principles apply. I also do a lot of road miles both in the UK and Europe, preferring minor roads when possible, so my set up is a compromise between road and track, biased towards handling. Toe in is probably the least varied setting from standard, but the rear MUST have toe in for stability, if it is set with toe out as one “expert” set mine you’ll soon realise why! The book recommends slight toe out at the front for better turn-in, but I insist on zero toe, mainly because any operative can understand zero toe, but very few can set a slight toe out accurately. Apart from ruining the handling, (the car will tramline a be very “darty”) excessive toe-out will rapidly ruin your front tyres and make the car unstable under braking. Caster is effectively fixed but camber is a whole new subject. For pure road work I’d stick to standard settings but for track work I like to increase it to -1.5 deg front and -2.5 deg rear. This is quite easy to do yourself (1mm shim = 0.3 deg.) using a Gunson Trakrite Camber gauge costing c.£30. This gives a big improvement in cornering, makes the car really dig in under power through bends and in fact I prefer it like this on the road as well. I’ve no way of proving it but my gut feeling is that this (and having the corner weights set) also gets rid of the snap oversteer. The handling now is superb, very stable and very comfortable over high road mileages and is probably the least tiring car to drive that I’ve ever owned. Of course all these ramblings are just my opinion but it works for me and may help you form your own opinions. Jim
  10. jimbo2

    Spa track day?

    I totally agree with Exploded - go with one of the good organisers such as Goldtrack, Circuit Days, Bookatrack etc, listen to the briefing, leave your ego in the pit lane and you won't have a problem, but note that Spa is hard on brakes and tyres. Look at it as a motoring trip with track day(s) thrown in and it could be a really good event, in fact I'd also suggest a (non-trackday) motoring tour into France in May, June or September using mainly D roads and a few passes for a smallish group. Jim
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