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Type 130 - Lotus Evija

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hexagonal buttons on the inside... Did Lotus take some design cues from Lamborghini?

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That Rimac on the Rosberg video looks rubbish. Really not in the hypercar class IMO. I am sure it goes like stink in a straight line, but I would take any other of it’s competitors on looks alone. Perhaps Rimac should just stick to the powertrains and leave the designs to others?

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2 hours ago, Likuid said:

Not saying sales aren't important, I have to imagine the main point of the Evija is to attempt to bring the name back into prominence. If its an amazing car that makes people drool then that means when the new line-up of cars come out people will be more willing to buy them. A lot easier to sell new line-up of equivalent Elises, Evoras, & Esprits with the Evija around IMO. Next thing for Lotus to work on is dealership networks, which I assume with the Evija and new line-up of cars will help get more dealers involved. Hopefully Geely has some pull with Volvo dealers to at least start servicing Lotus cars and maybe even open some Lotus showrooms.

The halo effect is a given and an important part of the plan but Geely most definitely require it to be a commercial success. The ambition has to be to achieve both. If the project doesn't at least break even it will have consequences for the long term plan. Geely aren't messing around with Lotus, they have very high expectations and the deal will change pretty quickly at Hethel if they aren't met. The next couple of years is the current management's shot to get it right. I don't think they'll get another. Any ideas of some blank chequebook being waved around up at Hethel are way off the mark. T130 needs to be a success so the pressure is on. If you know any billionaires, time to let them know about it! Russell Carr has delivered for Lotus. Time for the other departments to step up. Exciting times though.

If you have never wanted an electric car before, you will soon!

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I am looking forward to this a whole lot more than the stag week I am going to the day after. I genuinely hope this blows the journalists “Into Tomorrow”  to quote Paul Weller. But it does need to be light compared to the competition. 

I don’t know how many La Ferrari’s were sold or any of the other hyper cars, mainly because, to be honest, they just do not interest me. Is 130 cars ambitious, I don’t know? I hope not. I will however, say  a little prayer and be up stupidly early on the 16th to find out. 

Good luck Lotus and I genuinely mean that. 

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Yes, 130 cars is very ambitious in my opinion. But the car is quite something. Fingers crossed.

I'm convinced that the key to success in this rareified atmosphere is working out a way of making obscenely wealthy people even more money. That's really what's driven the hypercar proliferation. Ferrari, Porsche and (post 675LT) McLaren too have worked out how to do it but it's not so easy for a new name to gatecrash the party. Pagani managed it from nothing so it can be done, though Horatio was ex-Lambo. I think that Lotus have poured all their efforts into making the car amazing. The way it should be done in theory. In practice I think you need to put some thought in how to produce a 2-seater bank machine. Gordon Murray is using the McLaren F1 (the car all the wealthy car collectors wish they'd bought in hindsight) to sell his new hypercar. He designed the F1 of course but he didn't build it. Aston Martin is gambling on Adrian Newey's name and reputation to whip up a storm of interest and credibility.

The tricky part is getting the production limit right. If Lotus made less than 10 it raises questions about development budgets, it becomes almost too obscure, something no-one would have heard of. That's a turn-off for the show offs. 1 of 10 cars that nobody wants is worth less than 1 of 1000 cars that everybody wants. We see this already with our Lotus cars. Lots of one-off spec cars out there but that in itself is not considered anything unusual for Lotus and they are not worth as much as a very popular limited edition. If Lotus made more than 200 Evijas it probably wouldn't be considered exclusive enough would be my guess. Ferrari are good at making fewer cars than the demand but they have the benefit of being able to very accurately estimate the level of demand because they are bombarded with letters of intent and pre-orders years in advance. It also helps to know the names of collectors who already have all of the top limited Ferrari hypercars in their collection, it's a safe bet that they'll have the new one whatever it looks like. Getting an idea about the demand is much harder for Lotus. 130 cars sounds like a lot to me but if 131 people in the world who can afford one, want one, Lotus will be off to the races (quite literally probably!).

T125 single seater racer didn't do very well unfortunately. Good basic idea - a low maintenance F1 car - but I think it was too frightening for those that tried it and required too much commitment and skill for most of the have yachts. Evija will be much better for crawling through Knightsbridge traffic I'm sure!

 

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The question really is how many have been presold to dealers and collectors who will buy anything just because they can(lucky bastards)?

I do think they did not pick this number lightly - if they did it because of the Type number, they are idiots - the original production number for the car was low, around 25 if I recall, so they must have had a good reason to up that number by a 5 fold. This in itself would indicate high level of interest and in some case people readying their cheque book before the clay on studio mock up model was dry. Beside, Lotus did not commit to make 130 cars, they committed to make up 130 cars, there's no pressure if they don't sell them all. So they may have pre-sold around 30 cars already with another 30 prospective clients close to forking their cash... That would make around 60 cars and if my logic is sound and the Pits is to be trusted in his math then at 50/60 cars sold they would already  be beyond breakeven and generate a small but not insignificant profit.

If the sales team they've hired, some of which are VIP specialists, whom are only hired based on their address book, cannot shift these cars, they will very likely be fired let go, there's no two way about it. 

On paper the car is "sound" ; the chassis is carbon fiber developed by Lotus possibly with a little help from one of their most famous supplier,  the propulsion system is williams AE evolution of what they've been supplying to Formula E for 4 years now.  Design is  Carr's and is something else from the comments of the people who had a peak and the chassis dynamics is Kershaw, need I say more... So when it comes to engineering, R&D and design it is bullet proof! that leaves industrialization, sales and marketing to fail.

The car will be built in the skeleton building which will be dedicated to it during the car's production run. Lotus has been excellent at keeping its campus away from prying eyes I'd say. I don't know if they are on schedule but at least two buildings should be near completion by now (the new customer experience centre and the skeleton) insiders feel free to set me straight! they are going to entrust the car build to a small number of their most highly trained employees and the process will have been time stamped and scripted to the second by the time the last validation prototype is built.

Sales and Marketing are the ones with everything to prove, they need to get the car out there and so far I'd say they are doing a good job at creating a certain level of hype. But they really need to get the dealer network up to much higher standards and hyped up about the future. They really have to deliver on that, if they don't they can walk the front door and not look behind. 

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Sadly my maths is never to be trusted! I bought a GT430 for a start. 🤪

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Is a 7 figure car something Lotus dealers would handle, or would Lotus sell/service the T130 direct? What sort of mark-up would a dealer earn? It would be quite a risk to specify one for stock, so maybe they would just help you through the order form and take your deposit?

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I think you have hit the nail on the head, don’t want to sound negative at this possible the most important time for the company, but let’s face it how many dealers would you trust to sell a 7 figure car, for me there are not enough to count on one hand, so it as to be a factory only purchase with all the new facilities being built as we speak, sure Hethel can hand over the car and give the owner a experience the price tag deserves.

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I agree with this thought process. 

Imagine someone buying a 7 figure hyper car and rocking up at somewhere where like Silverstone lotus, a main dealer selling cars out of an industrial unit ! Not exactly the buying experience the target audience will be used to or indeed expect. 

The dealer network will need to improve if the brand is aiming for cars at the top of the market. 

Keep the Industrial estate dealers for the lower end of the new market and create a few very high end showrooms for the hyper cars. 

For the record.... I am at the lower end of the market 😂

interesting times ahead  

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Dealers are not the car, they are sold direct by the factory (like most hypercar in that’s price range). Dealers will be paid a handling fee for referring clients and managing delivery should customers want it this way.

 

on the maintenance, it is an electrical car, so likely to be much easier than most other cars but I won’t be surprised if the factory offers a special service.

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Yeah its unlikely you will see one new sitting at a dealer

6 hours ago, The Pits said:

Yes, 130 cars is very ambitious in my opinion. But the car is quite something. Fingers crossed.

I'm convinced that the key to success in this rareified atmosphere is working out a way of making obscenely wealthy people even more money. That's really what's driven the hypercar proliferation. Ferrari, Porsche and (post 675LT) McLaren too have worked out how to do it but it's not so easy for a new name to gatecrash the party. Pagani managed it from nothing so it can be done, though Horatio was ex-Lambo. I think that Lotus have poured all their efforts into making the car amazing. The way it should be done in theory. In practice I think you need to put some thought in how to produce a 2-seater bank machine. Gordon Murray is using the McLaren F1 (the car all the wealthy car collectors wish they'd bought in hindsight) to sell his new hypercar. He designed the F1 of course but he didn't build it. Aston Martin is gambling on Adrian Newey's name and reputation to whip up a storm of interest and credibility.

The tricky part is getting the production limit right. If Lotus made less than 10 it raises questions about development budgets, it becomes almost too obscure, something no-one would have heard of. That's a turn-off for the show offs. 1 of 10 cars that nobody wants is worth less than 1 of 1000 cars that everybody wants. We see this already with our Lotus cars. Lots of one-off spec cars out there but that in itself is not considered anything unusual for Lotus and they are not worth as much as a very popular limited edition. If Lotus made more than 200 Evijas it probably wouldn't be considered exclusive enough would be my guess. Ferrari are good at making fewer cars than the demand but they have the benefit of being able to very accurately estimate the level of demand because they are bombarded with letters of intent and pre-orders years in advance. It also helps to know the names of collectors who already have all of the top limited Ferrari hypercars in their collection, it's a safe bet that they'll have the new one whatever it looks like. Getting an idea about the demand is much harder for Lotus. 130 cars sounds like a lot to me but if 131 people in the world who can afford one, want one, Lotus will be off to the races (quite literally probably!).

T125 single seater racer didn't do very well unfortunately. Good basic idea - a low maintenance F1 car - but I think it was too frightening for those that tried it and required too much commitment and skill for most of the have yachts. Evija will be much better for crawling through Knightsbridge traffic I'm sure!

 

Oh yeah, don't get me wrong, if the 130 is terrible or they can't even give them away then it will be a huge blow. However I am sure both Geely and Lotus know how important this car is and I can't imagine it will be terrible. The only question is that will there be people out there that buy it? It really need to be something special and/or game changing I think. I will never own one, way out of my price range, but I hope it ushers in some new more "affordable" Lotus.

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7 hours ago, LotusLeftLotusRight said:

Is a 7 figure car something Lotus dealers would handle, or would Lotus sell/service the T130 direct? What sort of mark-up would a dealer earn? It would be quite a risk to specify one for stock, so maybe they would just help you through the order form and take your deposit?

I guess this can be said from most dealers in the network but there are a few everywhere that will be completely unfazed by this car:  Weissach here in Canada sells Koenigsegg, Galpin in the US sold Spykers, Manhattan Motorcars sells Bugatti, Koenigsegg and the likes, Lotus London Hexagon should not be afraid of it either, the middle east (Emirates) dealers are also more than equipped  to handle this kind of car and this is just to name a few. Not even mentionning a few of the japanese dealers and of course Lotus of Beijing  which will require their show cars. Remembers dealer don't have to buy built cars they just have to commit to build slot.

They preempt a build and keep it as theirs and on their end they can tell their client "yes we can get you one, what's your spec?" as they buy their slot they'll get the very nice customization package that will be overnighted from Hethel, done. Hypercars don't sell like sport cars but not all clients can actually find the time to fly away to spec their cars. Beside I would go back to the newly appointed Lotus VIP sales person, this is his job to handpick which dealership can  and will be entitled to receive build slot.

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There's some really insightful points in this thread and I'm enjoying reading this thread. The hypercar market really is booming at the moment and having considered the name now for a few more days, it occurs to me that its likely a name that will appeal to its market, despite the inevitable comments that will be made about it.  As has been said, look at the Ferrari La-Ferrari.

For volume, in this market, my gut tells me 130 would be too high; but if we break that down across all the markets, my guess would be that they need enough examples of it in each in order for it to establish itself.  Lets not forget they are new to this hypercar party, too few and it won't get embedded enough with the market place to support further models if there aren't enough of them to make its name.

That the cars dimensions are modest (4.4) is very exciting to me, it means that whatever technology its packing, its something that can be used for Lotus models down the line in the short term future.  I drove an Aventador a couple of years back, and it was one of the most intimidating cars to navigate in that I've experienced - a complete contrast the Ferrari 360 I also drove that day

Personally, for styling, I really, really hope it has some sort of 'Becker point' for its front wings - i.e. visible front markers that help you gauge your turn in!

 

For the dealers, if it were my call, I'd leave the dealers out of it and go direct.  Shame the airstrips not operational anymore - could have had clients fly in like Chapman used to do!

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I hope they sell loads, before the mother of all market crashes comes!

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On 26/06/2019 at 21:57, stephenwhyte said:

I hope to goodness it’s going to be put forward to compete in the new WEC series for Hypercars🤞.......otherwise it will be a lot less relevant than it should be😬 An incredible opportunity to remarket the brand and the only reason in my view to launch a Hypercar at this time

https://www.autosport.com/wec/news/141857/the-sportscar-opportunity-that-canEURTMt-be-missed

I,m a bit late to the conversation, but I was having the same thought while watching the Le Mans TV coverage. Is the timing of Lotus entering the Hyper car sector now, just a coincidence, or is there an eye on a possible entry into the WEC, in the near future. I believe that the rules will only allow hyper cars with ICE only or hybrid, with the electric powering the front wheels only. Race versions can be based on existing road car variants or prototypes designed for racing, providing 20 road variants are produced. While the Type 130/Evija, doesn't currently qualify, being all electric. Could the chassis, aero and electrification, form the basis for a Type 13? hybrid race car, providing an internal combustion engine, can be sourced. Producing 20 road going versions, should be possible, if Lotus are proposing to manufacture 130 Evija's. Aston Martin have announced they will enter with the Valkyrie and I think Toyota, have confirmed with a specifically designed new car and McLaren are showing an interest too.
Up until now, I have always had misgivings about electric cars, range, battery life, charging infrastructure, re-sale value. I get the reduction of emissions in populated area's, but questioned just how green the whole process is. Is it like your phone or laptop, once the battery has died, you throw the car away and buy a new one, because the price of a replacement battery, is as much as a new car. Having said that, I'm beginning to except that electric cars are coming, all the major car companies are investing, the Jaguar/Land Rover announcement, just today. So I guess it is only right that Lotus should be at the crest of this technological wave.
I'm excited to see the new Evija, electric does provide hyper performance and opens up the possibility for innovation with chassis architecture and aero. it's just that lack of exhaust note, we'll have to get used to. It may seem a big leap to produce an alleged million pound plus hyper car, but Lotus has always been about innovation, so why not show off what they can do, now they have the backing.

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There's no coincidence, just a plan that the new higher ups are putting in motion. Quinfeng made it clear, motorsport is on Lotus  agenda, however commercial success will dictate the terms of engagement, if the Evija and next year sport car are a sales success, then the road may take them to Le Mans top flight division. Should the success may only be moderate or critical, then they are likely to stay in GT... Evora is getting re-homologated as a GT4 but evolving to GT3 or GT2 will be quite easy, next year sport car could make it to the motorsport arena in one form or another. 

if the top flight is retained Evija was most definitely package protected to house an ICE at the back so considering the new Le Mans hypercar rulebook making it a hybrid would be doable. However even with budget cap  it won't be cheap to race the car, it would require a full factory race program.

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I agree that it’s a sad state of affairs and a reflection in where the brand is that we have such a poor dealer network. 

I think Lotus needs to fully review the network, either cutting out the industrial estate type (ala Silverstone etc) or invest in the network and some proper facilities. Only then can the brand play in the market it wants to. 

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Chicken and egg problem though isn't it? Dealers won't invest in snazzy new showrooms until the sales numbers and profit margins are up. Existing snazzy dealers aren't interested in stocking Lotus at the moment but cars like the Type 130 can start to change that.

Silverstone is definitely one of the better dealers out there.

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19 minutes ago, Edinburgh 111s said:

I agree that it’s a sad state of affairs and a reflection in where the brand is that we have such a poor dealer network. 

I think Lotus needs to fully review the network, either cutting out the industrial estate type (ala Silverstone etc) or invest in the network and some proper facilities. Only then can the brand play in the market it wants to. 

Interesting. Leven in Edinburgh seem quite happy to be an Aston Martin dealer on an Industrial Estate in Shitehill, Edinburgh. 

So, if you were a Lotus Dealer you'd be quite happy shelling out a couple of million of your own, on spec, for a swanky new showroom then? Hardly makes good business sense given current volumes. Also, what about the fact that many of these dealers are the reason why many if us are in Lotus cars?  Amie and Matt get glowibg reports at Silverstone. Jamie at Bell & Colville and I'm sure many more worthy if note.

We seem to be forgetting where Lotus has come from. It's never really been swanky and flash. Part it its appeal. 

We're heading down the super modern route like we did with supermarkets. No almost everyone laments the demise if independent shops, with their characters on both sides of the counter and the death of the High Street.  

Not all if the current Lotus dealers are great, not all if them are bad. And the old adage if don't judge a book by its cover should apply.

Many a swanky McLaren, Mercedes, Ferrari and Porsche dealer has an awful reputation for service too. The premises don't dictate the experience, the people who run it and work there do surely.

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Alcohol. Sex. Tobacco. Drugs. Chocolate.  Meh! NOTHING in this world is as addictive as an Evora +0. It's not for babies!        

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