free hit
counters
How safe is an Evora? - Evora Chat - The Lotus Forums - Lotus Community Partner #ForTheOwners Jump to content


How safe is an Evora?


Gareth44

Recommended Posts

Apologies in advance for shining a light on something many may not want to think about.

A month ago my wife was involved in a rather nasty accident, a head on collision with another car, with a closing speed of nearly 100mph and then hit in the drivers' side door/wing by the car behind her as she came to rest sideways across the road and shunted into trees.

Mercifully and somewhat unbelievably, she walked away with 'only' a broken wrist from the airbag and a broken collarbone from the seatbelt, plus some minor cuts and bruises, airbag burns etc.

She was in a 14-plate Audi A3 convertible, the door opened, the A-pillar was dead straight and the steering wheel and pedal box were unmoved. We are now replacing that with another Audi, just a bigger and newer one!

Anyway, never before have I really ever considered safety as a car feature (I don't have kids) but for the last month have been thinking about all the miles I did in my 20s in a 1990 plate Escort and an MGF, scary!

I don't think the S1 Evora has been crash tested, if it has I can't seem to find the results, but I wondered if, just anecdotally, anyone knows if it is good, bad or indifferent. My thoughts are that it isn't going to be great but the whole incident has taken some of the shine off the car I've waited a lifetime to own, so any reassurances gratefully received...…. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites


Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

As referenced above with the Evora book photos, of interesting note in the text, Lotus actually saved some money n the testing as they were able to reuse some of the cars. " Of the 19 experimental prototypes built between October 2007 and March 2008, six were crash test cars. In the event only four had to be used because the front structure can be replaced. So, after a frontal impact test, the team mounted a new subframe, new suspension and new front clam, and crashed it again." "The whole car is incredibly strong, we haven't even damaged a tub yet and that includes the 50 mph rear impact test." Dave Tankard (Lotus-Functional Leader for Vehicle Safety)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

:thumbsup:

You can see the way the front crash structure absorbs impact in this image, the way it becomes an 's' of metal to dissipate energy. It's incredibly well engineered for safety :)

Lotus_Evora_front_crash_test.jpg

  • Like 1

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

For forum issues, please contact the Moderators. I will aim to respond to emails/PM's Mon-Fri 9-6 GMT. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Gold FFM
1 hour ago, Bibs said:

It's incredibly well engineered :)

I would have just stopped there....

Alcohol. Sex. Tobacco. Drugs. Chocolate.  Meh! NOTHING in this world is as addictive as an Evora +0. It's not for babies!    

The first guy to ride a bull for fun, was a true hero. The second man to follow him was truly nuts!   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, very strong cars.

If I remember correctly, the Evora that the guy rebuilt in B is for Build on Youtube had flipped on its roof after a big frontal impact and he got that back on the road (if I were him I’d have used a new front subframe though).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I know of several people who have survived huge shunts in an Elise or Exige and of course the Evora is of similar construction. So, agreed a safe car. I always thought it a shame they lowered the sills for the 400 though. That can't have helped side impact protection.

Interesting how we all can ignore this kind of thing until it affects us personally. I am currently stuck at home recovering from concussion - not car related but it does make you a bit more risk aware generally. I have a Caterham sitting in the garage and you really, really would not want to have a crash it that!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While at the UK driving academy, was speaking to one of the engineers who said they spent a lot of time and effort making sure the car has good crash safety.  It has the potential to go pretty fast and they need to take that into account to make sure the occupants are safe.  He was very fond of the replaceable crash structures and sub frames also the roll bar which they strengthened and made sure it was fixed in such a way as to provide a higher level of safety than was the norm in the car industry.  It's not as strong a full roll cage but its better than the offerings from a lot of other cars.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Its well worth a read of the publish book ("Lotus Evora the making of a icon") - it lays out in great detail the development lifecycle of the car and theres a good section on the crash safety as outlined in the above posts.  A must have purchase for any Evora owner 🙂

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Lotus-Evora-Supercar-Johnny-Tipler/dp/1902351398

There's a comment about the brakes too - basically it was considered the best braking system fitted to a production car

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As others have said, fully crash testing done on the S1 for worldwide type approval, including head on frontal and offset frontal.  The rear impact is the US one that's to replicate what happens if the car is stopped on the hard shoulder and hit from behind by another vehicle at (I think) 50mph.  As well as no intrusion into the passenger cell, there has to be no fuel leakage.

Here are some pics of the crash tested cars on display at Hethel for the 60th in 2008:

spacer.png

spacer.png

spacer.png

I can't find the info but remember reading about two Evoras involved in serious accidents (one left the road into a field) and only minor injuries.  Strong cars!

Here's some info on the safety engineering: http://lotusenthusiast.net/2009/08/crash-management-for-the-lotus-evora.html

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I found the info on the one that went into the field.  Flipped and rolled, every panel damaged, roof split at sides, tyres ripped off.  Passenger cell not deformed.  Driver knocked out and then only bruising from seat belt

spacer.png

spacer.png

 

I also just found some other notes on my earlier crash test pictures.  In the offset frontal impact, note that the windscreen isn't damaged at all, which gives you an idea of the passenger cell integrity.  The reason the straight frontal impact car has a broken windscreen is because the car was also used for the pedestrian impact test.

 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Lotus really ought to publicise this a bit more, it’s a great piece of PR. The fact that the same basic car structure could be used in more than one crash test is pretty outstanding. I never knew about it and I’m a Lotus fan, the sportscar buying public really should have this fact put in front of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Gold FFM

Lotus have form for making very safe cars. @MJK will proudly tell you the Elite won the Don Safety trophy in 1976 - an award so prestigious I don't believe they gave it out on an annual basis - only when a car was deemed worthy enough of it.

The Evora is considerably over-engineered from a safety perspective. Never had any doubts of that when driving mine.

  • Like 1

James Martin (JayEmm)
Director of Photography & Car Enthusiast

Follow my Lotus adventure online! www.jayemm.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 22/05/2019 at 11:58, Techyd said:

Amazing really - considering their race cars were considered fragile

I have thought for many years the Elise/exige were fragile not due to how they perform in a accident, but how a small incident (running over a small object in the road or slop speed tap) can cause a very expensive repair bill due to clam replacement.  

Always assumed these cars were well constructed, feel most sports cars who are track focused are designed to protect the driver.  The number of times you see a Ferrari or Lamborghini where the engine is separated from the safety cell shows how they are designed to dissipate energy.  

Great to read/see the evora also falls into this category...  Just totally sucks I have to save up more money before I can get one..... ugh.....

 

Koenigsegg also used the same car for multiple crash tests, they stated it saved them millions doing it this way 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...