free hit
counters
Serious trouble V8 - Page 4 - Engine/Ancilliaries - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
MD355

Serious trouble V8

Recommended Posts

Pro Alloy CC kit is sweet, but they are dragging their feet.

twin charge cooler kit for Lotus Esprit V8 vehicles         https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wrWt0dmchsQ

They supposed to have it in production by Spring 2019. 

Promises, promises...

More customer pressure/requests are needed!  Email Alex Oates at  Alex Oates <[email protected]>

Perhaps, a substantial Group Buy Initiative would instill some high urgency on PA side?

Good luck

John

Pro Alloy_ twin charge cooler_ Lotus Esprit V8.jpg

Pro Alloy twin charge cooler _Esprit V8.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_7048.jpg

Edited by MrDangerUS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

Hi John,

Did you get any pricing indications?

cheers

-Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I email them (at both of their email addresses) but never got any response...

It looks super clean design and does not sacrifice the storage space or factory look of they car...

Wish they offered it and for a reasonable price !! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We never got to the pricing stage. I think we need to inquire with Alex frequently. More people, more requests=demonstrates an elevated demand.

Edited by MrDangerUS

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 08/07/2019 at 08:39, MD355 said:

Today's update !!

Forged pistons, all bearings, all oil pump new parts, all gaskets ordered !!!

Fortunately the machinist fixed the crankshaft requiring only +0.25mm bearings , which are available !!!

So now we wait for the parts to arrive to start the build !!

In the meantime, what do you guys think about intercooler / chargecooler on the V8 ?

Has anyone done it, reliably and cost effectively ? Thanks !!!

 

I want to post my .02 since I'm just about done with my v8 rebuild after a year of work. I want to see your rebuild succeed as many have not. I pray for mine.

 

1. pull all the oil galley plugs, the type that are pressed in.  2 on the block, 4 on the heads, 

2. inscrew all the threaded oil galley plugs, 2 on the block and like 8 on the heads. 

 3. flush it all out!

 

4. grind/mill off the rivets holding the baffles on the valve covers, remove the baffles (they are siliconed on) clean out the metal contamination, have a machinest drill/tap/screw in stainless 

hardware. put it all back together. 

 

5. replace all the valve stem seals. 

6. I wasnt able to take apart the hydraulic valve lifters, and it was too confusing finding replacements. I left these alone but soaked in oil for the entire rebuild. 

7. the hardest part,   oil coolers and lines........I DID Not re-use/flush/replace any of this. Instead I used a different oil cooler setup of my own including 2nd 100micron stainless cartridge oil filter setup.. 

8. inspect your cam journals and bearing caps..........idk what to say about this , machinests done have time for sorta repair. I polished all 4 similar to how a crank is polished. plastigauge to check clearance. 

 

 

I believe all this is a must after a spun bearing, i'm sure everyone here will agree. And maybe your machinest is way ahead of me on this. Good luck. 

Edited by v8GTmac1
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Today's update : Talked to Pro Alloy regarding the Charge-cooler kit !!

So today I spoke to a very polite gentleman at Pro Alloy and inquired about the availability of the Chargecooler system for the Lotus V8.

He explained to me that they did a one-off and they were planning to do fabrication of this system, but they were too busy.

He told me that probably around Christmas time they will bring in a customer car and start building those chargecooler systems.

In the meantime, I inquired about their radiator upgrade kits for the V8.

I am experiencing overheating issues and was thinking about upgrading.

I asked him if the chargecooler kit has the same or separate radiator.

He explained it is separate. I was debating between re-coring my existing radiator vs ordering a new bigger radiator from Pro alloy.

I asked if I re-cored my existing radiator, if this would affect installation of the chargecooler kit radiator in the future (if they build it)

He explained that it is separate system, however if I choose their raditator it has supports for the installation of the chargecooler radiator in the future.

What should I do in your opinion : Re-core my existing radiator (I will ask tomorrow cost) or buy the Pro Alloy radiator (799 plus shipping) ??

Thanks !!

Edited by MD355

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I already posted information about the ProAlloy main coolant and separate changecooler radiator earlier in this thread, as I have selected them for my project V8

There are very nicely made and designed to be used together.

IMG_1466.thumb.JPG.1ed29278a8fdd6367f855869113925be.JPG

 

  • Like 1

1996 Esprit V8, 1998 Esprit V8 GT, 1999 Esprit S350 #002 (Esprit GT1 replica project), 1996 Esprit V8 GT1 (chassis 114-001), 1992 Lotus Omega (927E), 1999 Esprit V8SE, 1999 Esprit S350 #032, 1995 Esprit S4s, 1999 Esprit V8 GT (ex-5th Gear project), 1999 Esprit V8SE ('02 rear)

1999 S350 #002 Esprit GT1 replica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Would you pick aluminum or black color ?

I guess aluminum (in my opinion) looks like unfinished... whereas black looks like a finished product...

Should I bother re-coring my radiator, or just order this one ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is your decision to make.

I went for this combo, as I will have my own chargecooler solution.


1996 Esprit V8, 1998 Esprit V8 GT, 1999 Esprit S350 #002 (Esprit GT1 replica project), 1996 Esprit V8 GT1 (chassis 114-001), 1992 Lotus Omega (927E), 1999 Esprit V8SE, 1999 Esprit S350 #032, 1995 Esprit S4s, 1999 Esprit V8 GT (ex-5th Gear project), 1999 Esprit V8SE ('02 rear)

1999 S350 #002 Esprit GT1 replica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any updates on the build?


1996 Esprit V8, 1998 Esprit V8 GT, 1999 Esprit S350 #002 (Esprit GT1 replica project), 1996 Esprit V8 GT1 (chassis 114-001), 1992 Lotus Omega (927E), 1999 Esprit V8SE, 1999 Esprit S350 #032, 1995 Esprit S4s, 1999 Esprit V8 GT (ex-5th Gear project), 1999 Esprit V8SE ('02 rear)

1999 S350 #002 Esprit GT1 replica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I spoke yesterday with my mechanic.

He told me the machinist where he sent the parts has the forged pistons ready with the conrods installed.

The machinist was having some trouble with the crankshaft... He is trying to make it perfectly balanced..

My mechanic told the machinist to get it perfect, because he does not the engine breaking anytime in the future... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm assuming that he is also matching/balancing the rods/pistons as well as the crankshaft?


1996 Esprit V8, 1998 Esprit V8 GT, 1999 Esprit S350 #002 (Esprit GT1 replica project), 1996 Esprit V8 GT1 (chassis 114-001), 1992 Lotus Omega (927E), 1999 Esprit V8SE, 1999 Esprit S350 #032, 1995 Esprit S4s, 1999 Esprit V8 GT (ex-5th Gear project), 1999 Esprit V8SE ('02 rear)

1999 S350 #002 Esprit GT1 replica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I personally don't have much experience from rebuilding engines.. This is my first car that needed total overhaul of the engine...

So I watched this video on Youtube that explains very well the process.

Later I called my mechanic and asked him if the machinist is doing all the steps described in the video (weighting the conrods, pistons, pins, rings, removing metal from conrods to make them equal , balancing the crankshaft with holes, etc etc)

and when I mentioned to him "within 1 gram tolerance", he told me that our machinist is doing the matching for much smaller fraction of a gram !!! He said he is trying to make the crankshaft perfectly balanced and the machinist is going to guarantee the longevity and smooth running of the engine !!! 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's good that your engine builder is taking such care  - that's a very good sign and you should feel the benefits of it in the smoothness of the power unit in the end.

Please keep us all posted on the build.


1996 Esprit V8, 1998 Esprit V8 GT, 1999 Esprit S350 #002 (Esprit GT1 replica project), 1996 Esprit V8 GT1 (chassis 114-001), 1992 Lotus Omega (927E), 1999 Esprit V8SE, 1999 Esprit S350 #032, 1995 Esprit S4s, 1999 Esprit V8 GT (ex-5th Gear project), 1999 Esprit V8SE ('02 rear)

1999 S350 #002 Esprit GT1 replica

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi.

I am just in the middle of rebuilding my Esprit V8 engine after the usual leaking liner problem appeared. its a 1999 GT unit from a fire damaged Esprit and looks as if its done less than 20K miles as there is no bore wear, hone marks are all still visible. I purchased a set of Carrillo forged pistons and  on weighing them, 7 were exactly the same, with one being less than 0.1 of a gram lighter. The Mahle pistons in my Excel 2.2 were way out in comparison and took a fair time to balance. Again expecting the rods to be out in the V8 on weighing they were all within 0.1of a gram. Can't comment on the 2.2 rods as one was damaged and I had to match to the lightest.  i had the crank and rods crack tested before assembly as well as the crank & flywheel balanced. The difference in smoothness on the 4 cylinder was remarkable but I have the feeling I wont notice much difference with the V8.

good luck with the rebuild.

  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks guys !! I will need all the good luck for my rebuild to work, even though my engine is in good hands !!

Funny part, I called back my mechanic and asked him if he sent the flywheel to the machinist, because from what I saw in the video, the crankshaft is balanced with the flywheel...

His response was hilarious... "You are telling something that others have been doing for over 50 years now !!!"

Apparently, my enthusiasm in my new knowledge is not shared by everyone !!

At least my mechanic has a good sense of humor... He added, that I am a good student, but I will be top student when I am able to set the timing on the camshafts of a Ferrari 360 Modena with the minimal amount of tools !! (It is an inside joke between us, it started 2 years ago when I took my Ferrari 360 Modena with messed up timing - previous mechanic's fault - and asked him to fix it with degree wheel & dial indicators. It took him just 1 day and minimal effort to fix it... My guess is that he has special tools from a perfectly timed Ferrari 360 Modena and he applies it as a template to fix the timing... so no need to use all the tools... however he will never tell me his secret !! LLOL)

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/09/2019 at 14:39, MD355 said:

I personally don't have much experience from rebuilding engines.. This is my first car that needed total overhaul of the engine...

So I watched this video on Youtube that explains very well the process.

Later I called my mechanic and asked him if the machinist is doing all the steps described in the video (weighting the conrods, pistons, pins, rings, removing metal from conrods to make them equal , balancing the crankshaft with holes, etc etc)

and when I mentioned to him "within 1 gram tolerance", he told me that our machinist is doing the matching for much smaller fraction of a gram !!! He said he is trying to make the crankshaft perfectly balanced and the machinist is going to guarantee the longevity and smooth running of the engine !!! 

 

Is anyone else a little horrified that he drills and grinds the crank to adjust the weight with minimum protection against the swarf from damaging the journals while spinning the crank?

cheers

-Chris

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I think he is a little crude about this work... He also doesn't give too much attention to tolerences (he say 1 gram difference is ok, when I asked my mechanic he said we are doing it at a few hundredths of a gram)...

I believe this must be a small block V8 or low revving pick up truck... Thus he doesn't care much... Just guessing...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most American V8 engines ( cross plane cranks) SBF, SBC etc etc  have an upper rev limit generally of about 6000 rpm. NASCAR engines running to 9000rpm would be the exception and the dynamic balance on those engines would be very tight  0.05gm or less.

Rover V8 engines for example manufactures tolerances for balancing were +/- 2.00gm > 1985. After 1985 they reduced the tolerance to approx 1.0gm. For the many Rover V8 engines I have built and where these were to be used for comp safari, rally raid ( all 4 x4) or circuit use  we would balance to "clubman Spec" which is +/- 0.1gm. The MGB CC championship cars (3.9 Rover V8 Engines) however use a flat plane crank ( Like the Esprit V8) and running carbs, distributor ignition see rolling road figures of approx 410 - 420 BHP @ 8200rpm. These engines are balanced to +/- 0.05gm

Not sure what the Lotus spec was but I would suggest a tolerance of +/- 0.05gm would be good. This would require the con rods to be balanced end to end accurately and the piston masses to be of a similar value. However there tends to be some variation with forgings as there is with cast pistons and therefore the accuracy of the total balance would be as good as the piston weight/mass. Items such as piston pins, bearings, piston rings tend to be consistant with little variation.

Removing small amounts of weight from a piston is possible but not advisable ( easy to weaken) whereas removal of weight from con rods is acceptable and adding weight ( tungsten inserts) or removing weight from crankshaft counterweights by drilling or grinding is the accepted method. However care needs to be taken to avoid damage from swarf or grinding dust on the bearing journals.

After balancing crankshaft assemblies are normally washed and then dried, oil way blown through and cleaned with pipe cleaners then oiled ready to install. The engine builder should check bearing and all oil ways before assembly.

I am reasonably sure that the Lotus V8 crank is internally balanced and not externally balanced as my flywheel when removed some years ago and from memory, had balance drillings but no additional weights bolted to the flywheel or harmonic damper assembly.

Internal balanced engines tend to rev more freely and not having weights on the flywheel means if a flywheel needs to be changed, as long as that is zero balanced ( neutral) the complete rotating assembly would not need to be balanced again when the flywheel or clutch cover was changed. In the video posted above which is an externally balanced engine, the weights bolted on the flywheel have an influence of the total balance and if the flywheel was changed and the incorrect balance weights installed or removed, the engine would vibrate, shake and not last too long. 

There are journals written on dynamic balancing and for a complete write up, and if you have the time and inclination, worth a read but you may find it has the same effect as several pints or a sleeping tablet !

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...