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I somehow managed to shuffle my TPMS pressures. Help! - Ride/Handling/Suspension/Brakes/Wheels/Tyres - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
Lotus Ed

I somehow managed to shuffle my TPMS pressures. Help!

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When I purchased my 2010 Lotus Evora used from a Lotus dealer, they had just put new tires on the car. However, they did not replace a TPMS sensor in the right rear that was reading 00psi. The Left rear read 37psi, and both fronts read 31psi. Of course, the orange low pressure light in the center was also illuminated.

As the car came from a different time zone, the clock was wrong. I started trying to fix the clock by pushing end of the turn indicator stick without success. Being a new Lotus owner, and realizing that I had no idea how to fix the clock, I read through the manual. Needless to say, I managed to set the clock. 

However, I noticed that I somehow changed around the pressure locations for all the tires. 
They used to read:
LF=31psi
LR-37psi
RR=00psi
RF=31psi

Now they read:
LF=00psi
LR=31psi
RR=37psi
RF=31psi

The manual does not address how to fix this. I'm not even sure how I did it. I tried searching old forums threads, but could not find any that specifically addressed this issue. Maybe I am the first person stupid enough to have done this.

Any ideas?

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As I replied to you in the other forum, I do not think you changed the pressure locations for the tires as they are not user programmable.

The TPMS will automatically identify the tire/wheel configuration by interpreting the signal strength as a distance from the individual sensor to the receiver.

 

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As per Chrome Orange, drive it for a bit, you'll probably find that they sort themselves out eventually. It's good because if you need to replace a sensor you don't need to get them programmed.

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If the tell tale is lit, there may be a fault code from the TPMS that the dealer can read. For example, there are different codes specific to tire/wheel location (LF/LR/RF/RR) for malfunction or dead battery. There are also separate codes for other malfunctions/communication errors.

And, don't feel bad, I don't think you did anything. But on a side note, I do plenty of stupid things every day  :)

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Nothing more to add other than from what I understand about the system I think Chrome Orange is correct.  The sensors don't need to be programmed with a position the system is self learning in this aspect.  I think the manual says to drive for ~7miles for it to detect everything etc ...  but for me when I replaced all 4 sensors it only took 3miles for the system to be up and running.

If you have faulty sensor(s) that need to be replaced have a search on here there is thread or two about replacement alternatives that cheaper than the ones from Lotus.

Also I know your pain about changing the clock, how did they manage to make it so annoying to change the time!

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As I'm in the UK, my clock is only correct 6 months of the year anyway. Too much hassle otherwise.

Re: TPMS, it's just a nightmare. Mine fixes itself, then occasionally throws its toys out the pram now and again.

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Yeah, I thought it would sort itself out too after driving awhile, but this thing is screwy. After purchasing from the dealer (who replaced the tires prior to purchase) I drove for about a week and a half, and put approximately 1000 miles on it. It read:

RR=00, RF=31, LR=37, LF=31

Then I messed around with the clock and it switched to RR=37, RF=31, LR=31, LF=00. 

And since the change, I have driven another week and a half and another 1000 miles. (Lots of joy-riding in the new car :) )

It's still screwed up. I manually checked the pressures at the wheel, and they match up with the old pressure positions (except the RR, which has 37 and not 00).

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Is there some sort of factory reset function that you can apply to just the TPMS system?

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Not that I know off.  I would have thought every time you switch the car in and off it is power cycling the TMPS control module. 

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On 19/06/2019 at 16:37, Lotus Ed said:

Yeah, I thought it would sort itself out too after driving awhile, but this thing is screwy. After purchasing from the dealer (who replaced the tires prior to purchase) I drove for about a week and a half, and put approximately 1000 miles on it. It read:

RR=00, RF=31, LR=37, LF=31

Then I messed around with the clock and it switched to RR=37, RF=31, LR=31, LF=00. 

And since the change, I have driven another week and a half and another 1000 miles. (Lots of joy-riding in the new car :) )

It's still screwed up. I manually checked the pressures at the wheel, and they match up with the old pressure positions (except the RR, which has 37 and not 00).

This is what my car did when I first purchased it. It settled down for about 6 months. Now the TPMS sensors work when it's hot but if it gets below 15C they drop out in a random order. I had the codes read and it was the TPMS batteries.

Oh yeah, the batteries are rated for 8-10 years, so cars build in 2011 or earlier are due for TPMS sensor failure.

Edited by G. Bell
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On 22/06/2019 at 13:14, G. Bell said:

This is what my car did when I first purchased it. It settled down for about 6 months. Now the TPMS sensors work when it's hot but if it gets below 15C they drop out in a random order. I had the codes read and it was the TPMS batteries.

Oh yeah, the batteries are rated for 8-10 years, so cars build in 2011 or earlier are due for TPMS sensor failure.

Thanks! Glad to know I am not the only one to experience this. I am taking the car in July 2nd for a thorough once over and to have a BOE CAI installed. I am going to have them check the TPMS also. I'll report back afterwards. Thanks again everyone.

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As 400 is the first car i have owned with TPS so its good to have an idea  of the life of the TPS batteries. It's almost worth changing batteries every few tyre changes.

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7 hours ago, Lotus Ed said:

 and to have a BOE CAI installed. 

Oh you're going to love the sound.  Just had one fitted to my car and I can't get enough of it.  Love the way you can hear the engine sucking in air and then at higher loads the throaty roar of the induction kit!  Should've some as standard on the Evora 😄

 

4 hours ago, au-yt said:

As 400 is the first car i have owned with TPS so its good to have an idea  of the life of the TPS batteries. It's almost worth changing batteries every few tyre changes.

I'm not the world expert on TPMS but I haven't some across any TPMS sensors where you can just change the battery you have to buy a new sensor. ☹️ I'm sure its just a standard button cell type battery like CR3032 so should be totally possible to get a replacement.  But the sensor body is usually sealed plastic and I think prizing it open will damage the casing.  Doubt it makes much problem for the sensor to have a damaged body as I doubt there is much moisture or anything else inside a tyre to damage the electronics.  Its an other car industry con 😉

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You can replace almost every sensors battery but it's not supported by the manufactures. Just change the sensors after 6 or 7 years.

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I bought a set of wheels with winter tyres and one TPMS sender did not work - it appears that using the can of goo to fix a puncture can gum up the sender. The tyre had been replaced but not the sender.

I ordered a Lotus B121G6000F and it, and the old one that was gummed up, are both GM part 13227143.  Search for 13227143 and you'll be able to choose the cheapest supplier of the OE part (and I'm sure it won't be Lotus)

Others TPMS senders are available that claim to work but I played safe with the OE to ensure it communicated. Even so, the new TPS took several miles before it produced a reading on the dash, which caused me some anxiety until it did.

Page 62 of the (UK) Handbook says integral batteries should have an average service life of 10 years.

My understanding is that they switch off when not rotating for a while so will depend whether your Evora is a daily use or weekend toy for how long the batteries last ...   and whether you run on another set of wheels in winter..

Cost me £20 at my local garage for them to install the new sender so I'll be applying the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it' proverb ..

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