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OOPS, CRASH BANG, REPAIR AND RENEW ..


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Moving on .   We now have the damaged section removed  at the rear and the rest of the structure solid..  I have shimmed some wooden blocks into place where the new section will sit . This is so it wi

We can now start the repair procedure.  The first job is to address the rear body to chassis mount on the O/S . This has had an attempt to repair previous, unfortunately it was a bit DIY and had faile

Moving forward, the next stage was to lay up the GRP on the inner faces . This will secure the section solid in place and enable the Cleco and bridge plates to be removed . Where the bridge plates wer

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I know we discussed this, but seeing the pic is a jawdropper!

British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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38 minutes ago, Sparky said:

I know we discussed this, but seeing the pic is a jawdropper!

You ain't seen the best.. this is just a taster .   

ce94ef2b78f463f7d34576844db6ccca.jpg

Answers on a post card , calls will be charged at standard rate , plus a bottle of Gin for @Sparky

1 hour ago, Barrykearley said:

Ummm 🤪

Does that mean you know or are you just Ummming a tune .. :sofa:

 

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Looking at the angle of that rear wheel then the angle of the fixing through the trailing arm everything has sprung back and the actual boss has bent/sheared which passes through the arm.

I bought a V8 in 98 which suffered a bent chassis from hitting a tree only around 6” further back. Visually it looked like just a quarter panel repair, how wrong I was and ended up needing a chassis change. I had lots of bits like the trailing arm which appeared okay until attached to the new chassis where the car ended sitting at an angle on the back.

Shame as looked like the owner spent lots getting the car to such a nice standard although no doubt you will have it going again soon Dave?

Dave :) 

Do or do not, there is no try! 

 

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30 minutes ago, TAR said:

is the reinforcing plate missing?

There also seems to be a wierd non-standard split shim used.  So I'm guessing the reinforcing plate be on the wrong side of the chassis and the a non standard part used to get the toe in back to spec?

Looking at the nyloc nut, there is also a suggestion that it may have run out of thread, also suggesting too much hardware on the bolt

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7 hours ago, TAR said:

is the reinforcing plate missing?

🙂

This answer is getting warm .. :whistle:

 

6 hours ago, 910Esprit said:

There also seems to be a wierd non-standard split shim used.  So I'm guessing the reinforcing plate be on the wrong side of the chassis and the a non standard part used to get the toe in back to spec?

Looking at the nyloc nut, there is also a suggestion that it may have run out of thread, also suggesting too much hardware on the bolt

This is getting hotter .....:2guns:  In fact almost to hot to hold ... with great observation on the Nyloc , that bit is steaming .. 

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I had no idea what I was looking at, but now that I've seen the exploded diagram that car must have been an accident waiting to happen for a long time!

I feel bad for the owner having trusted "professionals" to look after his car :(

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6 minutes ago, 910Esprit said:

Oh yeah - The bush is fitted on the inside of the chassis instead of the outside.

:clap:   Well done Steve ...      You were so close on first shout  .. 

DSCN0655.thumb.JPG.4f9c0b2429a89551ae9f5a286f53faa7.JPG

As you can see not only is it fitted on the inside , but the a thick tracking plate it fitted to the inside causing even more toe in .. 

But here is the kicker ..  You were on the money again @910Esprit with your first observation  , When the Nyloc nut was remove there was barely  4 threads engaged . The thread was well short of engaging with the Nyloc. 

589740264_DSCN0642(2).JPG.bc2089ae8dbd4b6770bae3ef57676c06.JPG

Scary when you are throwing  in this case 270 BHP at it  ..  This was work that had been done by previous owner , then gone un-noticed during service and checks done on MOT's etc.  ...   But in defense of those mechanic's , If they were not up on how it should be done , it would look fine ..    What this does expose is what can happen when the uninitiated carries out work on the Esprit.   My biggest question is what were the GEO figures .. ??   Unfortunately all the rear suspension is now bent , so unable to asses what was ..  

More to follow   :coffee:

 

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auch!

That was bad. Really bad. I hope that the owner/driver is okay with no personal injury.

I fully agree to the layman doing something in blindness, and not looking thoroughly on what to do and how to do it.

One may think that as time passes by, there will be other versions of what was done and what caused it all over the web (as usual) and that lead to yet another story of lots of trouble, usually seri...., blah blah blah. Just yesterday I was speaking to a guy who recently bought a fully original 87 hci and said it drives like crap- Upon asking, I was told that dampers, belts, bushes, rack, joints etc. are all the original. So much for the "fully original perfectly stored" car. Well, the paint was good, and also the leather, but the mechanics was never serviced. And as it will come for sale soon, the asking price is 60.000 gbp. Maybe that's just market going up?

So, good that the car is now in Davids hands to be sorted. Cannot think of many people I would entrust the car, only very very few.

Good luck on the repair if at all possible, and let's see some more as it surfaces.

Kind regards,

Jacques

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Nobody does it better - than Lotus ;)

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Growing up during Lotus' glory days I was well aware of the firm's roots in racing and, though generally ignorant of things mechanical, understood that the street cars were built with an approach reflecting that focus. That past owners of the various tractors passed off as sports cars may wish to believe their newly acquired Lotus toy is fine to operate as if mass produced is pertinent here. Perhaps it's worth being mindful that younger mechanics have only lived in an age where automobiles are typically reliable as a household appliance.

Plan to find a thoroughly competent, race engineer grade mechanic or be prepared to spend your own time crawling around beneath the thing to ensure operational safety. Perhaps test your prospective mechanic's response to the attached image?

GOV_SURVEILLANCE.jpg

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Sadly - the mot test will pass all of those bushes unless there is excess play obviously present. Fit for purpose as per design they may not be - but you will see bushes like that on many many cars driving out the mot centre.

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Only here once

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I've never driven a properly set up Esprit to know what it should feel like but having done only a mere 160 miles in my "project" in the two years I've had it (most of that mileage was the first journey home in it) I know the tracking is clearly all over the place. Once its back on the road the first thing I plan to do is look at the alignment since to me that can make or break (literally in this case 😢) the driving experience of the car.

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7 hours ago, CHANGES said:

This unfortunately is quite true . In this particular case when using a pinch bar, there was excessive movement in some of the bushes . Well excessive from my stand point, which is not as new .. :rtfm:..   Just how they were interpreted by and examiner we will never know..       :wallbash:  

What I am really trying to get across here is, what seems to be a general lack of importance paid to some very crucial parts on our Esprit..  Failure to stay on top of these could put you in a situation which created this thread.    We are all very pleased when our Esprit passes an MOT , but we should not totally depend on it as clean bill of performance capability..   I quite often ask customers when they last had their GEO checked ..  The answers are very disappointing . When my Esprit is in service it has GEO check done at same time of MOT .. So annually..   Many may ask why.   Well the answer is simple . These Esprit are pieces of engineering, shimmed and tweaked to an exact standard .. When this goes out they will not perform properly.   Maybe i am a bit OTT but I can feel when my Esprit is a bit off.  It is usually just down to tyres, usually needing  pressures adjusting.  , but noticeable to me  ..  So a soft or deformed bush as above pics will effect GEO and feel drastically..  ..    I believe the biggest fall down of owners , is with those who have never driven a fully sorted set up .  As such they except the package they have  purchased as the norm.  Over time this degrades and as long as they never over stress the components everyone is happy..   Then out of the blue you are going quite quick or have to brake heavy .. ' it happens'  OOPS out of control crash bang...  '' which could have been avoided ''     So what owners need to ask themselves is, what cost more suspension maintenance or the unthinkable ..     

Rant over :scared:,

stay safe , and enjoy your piece of  Lotus engineering.. :thumbup:

If the first Europa I drove would have stood as my only such experience I'd quite possibly have written off the things altogether. This was a thoroughly bagged offering from a small, Brit car dealer, probably in the same or worse nick as the Esprit here. Happily, I've since had plenty of seat time in Elan, Europa and Esprit all in fine fettle - sublime!!

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Totally agree with all the comments here - maintenance by workshops that do not know these cars is a lottery, not just as far as suspension goes but pretty much every aspect of the car mechanically.

However, in terms of GEO setting they are even more specialised because so many adjustments require shims rather than tweaking an eccentric bolt or a few turns on an adjuster......so Dave, who do you recommend to do the job correctly? Northampton Motorsport? Centre Gravity? Any recommendations greatly received!

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I've driven hundreds of Esprits, and rarely have I found one perfectly set up. My GT3 is a beauty, not because I made it so but because that is how I bought it _ and why I bought it.  I've also been fortunate enough to drive Dave's Esprit, and it is sublime, like nothing I've ever experienced.

I believe many owners have driven only their own, maybe one or two others, so may never have experienced a properly geo'd Esprit, or had the opportunity to compare good with bad.  It is some of the best money you will ever spend.  Unfortunately it's my experience that said money is spent rarely.

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I always get my caster, camber and toe set up following a build or suspension work as transforms the car. I book a half day slot and the team at pro tyre always take the time to get it right with a print out even allowing you under the car to help out if you choose. I always make sure everything is cleaned up and lubricated to allow easy adjustment which they appreciate and renew all lock nuts after. Where required I take shims to prevent delays.

The Elan was probably the worst handling Lotus I’ve ever driven and left being one of my favourites. My Mini’s are always fantastic after and the team are big fans doing loads so set them up well. This isn’t a cheap service but the best money I spend on my cars bar none. My JPS will be going down especially as I’m removing the federal springs and changing several bushes. I’ve never had an Esprit set up so really looking forward to it, any tips for the team are appreciated as they have only set a late Stevens car before?

270B1D60-04C1-4619-A2D2-BC8A897BFFCE.jpeg.594c1dff2c4edd7a28b373c921f97bae.jpeg60CC740C-D2E7-45DF-B6D6-180B5B186C96.jpeg.14f03dab5369c28c6e5169fde76e843d.jpeg

Sorry for the terrible photos 🙄

Dave :) 

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Do or do not, there is no try! 

 

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Experience in setting up my own Esprit looms ahead, as I put my S2 on the road with restoration complete. The finest I've driven so far was a mate's S1 with Koni's, front springs clipped about 3/4 coil, uprated lower front arm (bushes), P7 Pirelli on 15x7, 8x16 rims fore/aft, all else being top condition OEM bits and using conventional alignment specs. Tyres/wheels yet TBD in my case but I'll otherwise start as with his plus uprated engine mounts, likely slight toe-out up front. Once able to wring it out properly I'll soon feel whether there's more to be had, informed by years of tracking and tweaking my Elan until it was sharp as a tack. Happy memories forever of that little charmer. 

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