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A short update that covered a huge amount of work, all of Saturday pretty much. Some extra work due to the fact that I use the car to store stripped items inside itself due to space limitations and th

Far too late here -sorry!   May help in the future.  This is the tool I made to hold the hub while undoing/tightening the nuts on my Elite: It made removing/tightening the nuts pretty easy

Really sorry to be so late to the party - going back to the question on page 2 about the front spolier, here is another pic.  Basically it was just masked at the line where the section from the front

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Minor, but I would fix the cross braces above. Thereby raising the body shell a tiny bit higher, which you will find useful. And also minimising the underside contact area for preparation etc.

In practise we had to momentarily release the body shell during the work on it to gain access. Even though I used metal box sections which were a lot narrower in dimensions.

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I cobbled up something of the sort though with some lumber turned on edge for beam strength but mostly to elevate the shell. Used 2 x 6 for most, running PU rollers of about 5" diameter as the garage floor is smooth concrete. Working is OK for the most part, full swivel rollers at 4 corners a mixed bag permitting ease of repositioning but allowing the thing to shift around more than would be ideal at times. Found the stability needed in setting aside the dolly cart at times, perching the shell on solid blocks.

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Thanks Dave and Dr Doom,

I need to see how it rests on the body for the final assembly. I did think about putting the cross sections on top but my thoughts were to spread the body load on the scaffold board or overthinking it? Some of the wood is different thickness and it would focus the stress in a few isolated points, whereas the scaffold method would run back to front.

I’ve just used the bolts I have to hand but think I’ll need coach bolts unless the boards are long enough to place the trolley wheels near the existing wheel wells where the heads won’t foul.

The below is as far as I’ve gotten, I’ve cut the cross beams to under 50 inches so I can still get the outer sills off the car. If I can remove all the stuff from inside I can measure the seat mount holes across the cabin and finalise the dolly for the body lift party post lockdown.

The wood is just building rubbish I had to burn from a house refit 20 years ago  (been busy!) and a little warped even before it got chucked outside. 

The thin pieces I’m going to use inside the cabin to spread the stress on the top where the bolts go through the seat holes, they match the length of the runners.

Im trying to build it to minimise the chance of it tipping the body when it’s away for work and did consider basing the whole thing on a couple of old pallets I’ve got, which I might still use instead of the cross bars.

Making this was one of the sticking points stopping me moving forward / arranging the lift so it’s a few hours well spent.

I think I’ve just the steering knuckle to remove that would foul the lift and I’ll do this on the day.

Quick question, I’ve seen a thread regards rebuilding the steering rack. Mine seems OK, leave as is or new bearings as it’s free if the car? 

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Geometrically I'd say your thinking tracks well. One wants peace of mind in handing the shell over to be finished so correct to fasten securely. My rig remains a work in progress with the shell simply perched atop, OK for my purposes usually but short of what would amount to secure fastening for work when in the hands of others. The short, upturned "claws" at the lateral boards' ends were a bit ill-conceived as they impair access to the sills whilst not affording the security of attachment via fasteners. The empty shell is light enough to dismiss worries of vertical load stresses via board contact, will remain so right through full reassembly with care in providing ample perch areas.

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The body shell is stiffer than you seem to think. And it's not heavy.

But the dolly needs to be robust enough to allow you to transport the body shell on to a trailer, and for the time it'll be away. Mine being metal, this wasn't an issue.

As long as it's wide enough to accommodate the outer seat bolts I wouldn't worry too much.

BTW one of my casters had a foot brake, which was really useful.inCollage_20191031_222917855.thumb.jpg.b24752cbb54ccf21459e605a390bb83c.jpg

Edited by Fridge
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Thanks, 2 of these castors are braked and I’ve sited them opposite corners, the body shop that will take the shell has a really rough floor so thought opposite brakes would be good. One of my concerns was the dolly tearing the GRP where the bolts go through but I’ll keep an eye on the stress when I site it.

Fridge, did think that the wheels need to be able to fit on my friends trailer for transport originally and this had slipped my mind.

We’ll work a solution but reckon the dolly won’t bridge that gap, maybe chock it or something, cross that bridge when I come to it.

 

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I'm sure it'll be fine.the body shell just needs to be secure, and nothing more. You're not driving it!

It should be strapped down whilst on the trailer anyway.

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Be mindful that it may be a painted shell on its return, countenance nothing short of the mark in regard to the transport rig for that.

I'd advise you consider how high the shell must be carried on the cart in order to avoid grounding out badly at the nose, either loading or unloading.

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Just make sure the wheelbase isn't too short and you'll be fine.

Check out the photo I posted to give you an idea.

On its return just bolt the body shell down firmly to the frame and secure the dolly to the trailer as you would any load, and use the wheel brakes. Drive smoothly and slowly and it'll be fine.

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Could anyone recommended a good supplier of fibreglass materials and the grades I should buy to accomplish various repair / filling tasks on the body?

I’ve been reading up and have also received some great advice so I’m going to attempt some of the repairs myself.

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I buy all my stuff from Easy Composites (mail order) - Some very good how-to-do-it videos on their site as well. Good service and products.  Very helpful if you need to phone them.

Pete

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I’m stripping the engine of ancillaries in preparation of sending it off for a check over while it’s out of the car.

I’ve watched the two Lotus related segments below (hope links are allowed) and they have got me thinking.

I’d prefer to add the later style cam wheels to allow the upgraded belt, I’ve seen these online and can get these if worthwhile? 
 

Looking at my engine image, these appear to be the older square cam teeth profiles as the original factory?

Below are screen grabs of the later upgrades. I’ve been told the vernier feature is not that necessary if I’m not after massive gains so may go for a standard fixed cam wheel if available with the new profile.
 

I’ll probably stay with a semi-automatic tensioner as while I expect I’ll be servicing the car myself, I don’t think I’ll be doing the belts but using a local Lotus specialist for this, based on the criticality of the job and how awkward it is.
 

The tensioner will therefore be checked and bearing replaced with belts every three years or 5K miles, whichever is sooner, or whatever the new type of belt says regards the extended schedule.039BB83B-5FA2-44EF-8C8A-70F17CCFBFB0.jpeg.4b4e3801b95b0e3f6158fc3e512a30bd.jpeg

The porting seems to be a good upgrade while the engine is in bits?

My main concern is cleaning the water jackets out and how far the strip down needs to go.

While the engine is out, I’m happy to make minor gains in power etc but I’m not that bothered about producing a mega power upgrade, just want to get it reliable, robust and without flat spots etc.

What would you all recommend on an engine that’s been stood for a while, circa 50K miles, while it’s out at a specialist shop?

I’m thinking of at least fully stripping it to check tolerances and clean it, I’d prefer not to be taking it back out in five years!

Appreciate any advice you can offer....

Ditto recommendations for carb overhaul, a few hits on google, anyone to use for the dellortos? 

 

 

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Bloody elementary to me, somewhat helpful for the complete novice one would suppose. Broadly on the matter of power output, area under the torque curve is the objective. Those 240 BHP rally tuned lumps generate something like 170 lb-ft of torque at peak, versus 140-150 for any garden variety 907. It's helpful to understand that torque is a measured force from which HP is derived via the simple formula ( T x RPM ) / 5250. Consequently the torque and HP of any engine are always equivalent at 5250 RPM, helping illustrate why HP is generally contemplated in terms of upper end revs whilst torque is viewed more in terms of roll-on grunt.

The basic architecture of these engines emulates the early DFV Cosworth, not accidentally I'm sure and indicative of both good burn and breathing for its time. Inlet and exhaust flow have much to say on ultimate output, higher CR pistons affording some improvement. Simple port matching and valve seat work expertly done should serve a street engine. It appears that stretching out to 2.2 via the 912/910 crank truly lights up the lower reaches under the torque curve. 

Cheers  

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The inlet manifold removed....

67664B7A-5922-4D72-9F9A-56CF7E8D9728.thumb.jpeg.2817f05320dd31f4b8a948556cb62bf5.jpegAll apertures seem to match well and are roughly hewn, maybe no need for further work in this area as already ported??

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The water pump had a couple of hex bolt replacements which helped careful removal...E45D218F-D7A8-4D05-B4A1-26B42CC690BE.thumb.jpeg.71346b1e78c31c230f1d77138533f411.jpeg

Once the pump was off, no evidence of a gasket other than some type of silicon substance....

 

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I can’t remove one of the bolts without removing the pulley, hope this isn’t an issue as I’ll be sending it away for a refurb / replacement....

The block looks a little rusty in the water ways, hopefully nothing too serious?

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Made a start on releasing the manifold, kudos to anyone who ever had to do this in situ as I’m struggling with great access now the body is off!

Three of the nuts are totally inaccessible with a ring spanner and one has rounded, may need to somehow dremel a slit in the nut to free these, not sure how I’ll get in though....needed to gently tap the bolts to get them moving after firstly freeing up the chassis cross brace (still in position in this shot).

Most difficult bolts so far, manifold will be replaced by a system with individual tubes and a collector if I can find one.....

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A quick question, this is the direction of the water flow?

If this is the case, the system was just missing the swan neck tube (outbound to radiator) and the otter switch.

I can see how the water circulates now it’s apart if this is the case.

Is there any merit in running a system with out the thermostat in place so water always flows via the front radiators?

There’s space down in the chassis for a secondary in line water pump on the out bound leg to the radiator, to give it a boost through the chassis etc.

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The purpose of the thermostat is to regulate the engine temperature at a desired value, say 90C. If there was no thermostat, the engine could simply end up operating at cooler temperatures. Which it has not been designed to do.

Take a look at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radiator_(engine_cooling)

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Given the smaller water pump impellor of the 907 engines I'm surprised folk don't try fitting an auxiliary water pump in-line to boost it, but I've never heard of anyone doing it. Perhaps there are obvious issues in doing so, but once again, I wouldn't over think it. Just upgrade the radiator to a modern triple-core, or go with an alloy one if you feel it may be better (I don't think it is), and upgrade the cooling fans to Spal or similar. Job done.

I fitted an additional bank vault style auxiliary thermostatic switch in the front compartment in case the otter switch fails, together with a manual override switch as a fall back option. Just in case...

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12 minutes ago, Fridge said:

Given the smaller water pump impellor of the 907 engines I'm surprised folk don't try fitting an auxiliary water pump in-line to boost it, but I've never heard of anyone doing it. Perhaps there are obvious issues in doing so, but once again, I wouldn't over think it. Just upgrade the radiator to a modern triple-core, or go with an alloy one if you feel it may be better (I don't think it is), and upgrade the cooling fans to Spal or similar. Job done.

I fitted an additional bank vault style auxiliary thermostatic switch in the front compartment in case the otter switch fails, together with a manual override switch as a fall back option. Just in case...

Thanks for both responses.

Rudi, from memory my old car I’m sure spent most of its time with that radiator water circuit open, could have been silted up due to age or just summer running.

I tended to run it with fans on via over ride as per a system Fridge mentions, I was worried about over heating having had a water pump fail on me on the motorway once. It held at a steady 90 on the dial, I was more paranoid of higher temp than lower ones so may not have been getting the best from the engine.

It is more of an impeller than a proper pump. The design means that to fit an in-line aux water pump, the thermostat would need to be removed or the aux function only active when water is in that part of the circuit, as the water comes straight out of the block behind the pump and runs for the main part internally, so not suitable for an aux pump to replace this bit really without faff.


With modern antifreeze and a clean radiator, I should be OK I expect.....

I’m looking at the parts diagram, my water pump has the temp sender tapped into the top of the pump (you can just see it at the tip of the arrow as a yellow dot).

No reference on the parts manual for this, on there it appears to run from the manifold between the carbs....

 

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My water pump had and the exchange unit still has that hole blanked off with a bolt.

The water temperature sensor on my S1 is located in the centre of the inlet manifold. Between the carbs.

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Quick sketch on the vital points: cooling system must be supplied with chemically sound coolant for corrosion control; thermostat or some more complex method mandatory in ensuring temperatures approach design targets; the Lotus water pump is of conventional impeller design, altogether typical. These are not delicate engines, rather Lotus did a reasonable job of engineering robustness overall through the course of initial development. Therefore if the fundamentals are properly seen to in build and operation of the car, one may be confident of satisfactory reliability and durability.

Cheers

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Erm,

If you had to explain this to an idiot (not me obviously, I’m an expert), where would you suggest I (I mean they) would begin stripping down?

The engine is nearly back to block to facilitate it being moved to a rebuilder.

I don’t have a crane, so was going to dolly under the engine then split the suspension and lower the whole thing down slowly.

I’ve bought a set of spring compressors but before I jump in like I did on the pedal box to find an easier way of removing further down the line, wanted to check for any best sequence.

All but 2 of the manifold bolts are off but I’ve given up on this until the engines out.

I reckon the lower link bolts are now part of the hub, so I’m going to have to drag the whole suspension away from the car....

I’m going to crack all the wheel bolts later today, the main question is engine out first or engine out last?

I’m working alone so no one to help hold up any other ends etc if that’s a consideration.....

Watched a few you tube videos but they usually have a wealth of kit in support.....

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I did rear first, then front. Lifting the chassis over the engine like a wheel barrow.

Best with two people, and supporting the engine and gearbox as the rear suspension is dismantled. We probably used spring compressors, but I honestly can't remember, it was that trollied.

We split the engine from the gearbox to carefully dragged away.

We then dismantled the front suspension.

All this took a single afternoon.

Once removed, you'll be able to better assess the rear hubs. Whatever you do, don't use a hammer on them or the bar.

Edited by Fridge
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