free hit
counters
painting rear chassi - Esprit Chat - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
red vtec

painting rear chassi

Recommended Posts

has anyone painted there chassi/suspension with something like hammerite? as mine looks a bit shabby.

Does it cause any problems?


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

I just keep waxoiling the complete chassis ,i think most people recommend por15 from frosts,good luck Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does an '88 need any attention with that fully galvanised chassis?? My own approach is more along the lines of ramps, a scrubbing brush and hot water when Spring eventually arrives.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the thing is I have heard that a galvanised chassi will still rust in the end so i was thinking a coat of paint would smarten it up and protect


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So far as I'm aware there's no reason why galvanised steel should not be painted although painting is generally not necessary. I'm not very good at explaining this stuff so here's an extract from Wikipedia,

"Zinc coatings prevent corrosion of the protected metal by forming a physical barrier, and by acting as a sacrificial anode if this barrier is damaged. When exposed to the atmosphere, zinc reacts with oxygen to form zinc oxide, which further reacts with water molecules in the air to form zinc hydroxide. Finally zinc hydroxide reacts with carbon dioxide in the atmosphere to yield a thin, impermeable, tenacious and quite insoluble dull grey layer of zinc carbonate which adheres extremely well to the underlying zinc, so protecting it from further corrosion, in a way similar to the protection afforded to aluminium and stainless steels by their oxide layers.

"Hot dip galvanizing deposits a thick robust layer that may be more than is necessary for the protection of the underlying metal in some applications. This is the case in automobile bodies, where additional rust proofing paint will be applied. Here, a thinner form of galvanizing is applied by electroplating, called "electrogalvanization". However, the protection this process provides is insufficient for products that will be constantly exposed to corrosive materials such as salt water. Nevertheless, most nails made today are electro-galvanized.

"Galvanic protection (also known as sacrificial-anode or cathodic protection) can be achieved by connecting zinc both electronically (often by direct bonding to the protected metal) and ionically (by submerging both into the same body of electrolyte, such as a drop of rain). In such a configuration the zinc is absorbed into the electrolyte in preference to the metal that it protects, and maintains that metal's structure by inducing an electric current. In the usual example, ingots of zinc are used to protect a boat's hull and propellers, with the ocean as the common electrolyte."

As is mentioned above corrosion is an electrolytic process. This is why every car sold today has a "negative earth" system. i.e. the negative terminal of the battery is connected to the chassis. Many years ago things used to be done the other way round but cars with a positive earth were found to corrode more readily even though it made no difference whatsoever to the electrical systems of the car! Strange but true. Here's an extract from some Rolls Royce history,

"With the S Cloud series and all models since, the Company reverted to negative pole of the battery to frame although their reasons had nothing to do with the radios. Let me quote from the RREC 1978 Technical Manual:

"...it has been found that cars wired positive earth tend to suffer from chassis and body corrosion more readily than those wired negative earth. The reason is perfectly simple, since metallic corrosion is an electrolytic process where the anode or positive electrode corrodes sacrificially to the cathode. The phenomenon is made use of in the "Cathodic Protection" of steel-hulled ships and underground pipelines where a less 'noble' or more electro-negative metal such as magnesium or aluminium is allowed to corrode sacrificially to the steel thus inhibiting its corrosion. "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My GT3 was particularly leaning towards the rusty side - the 1989 SE is in better condition !

However the chassis was fine - it had gorwn this sort of scale on it (like limescale / cement - really wierd) so I rubbed it back with a wire cloth until it was smooth and painted it.

The galvanisation on the chassis is VERY deep so it should not corrode - I'd be confident in that it'll last the length of the cars life no probs but I chose to paint mine to stop that crap building up on it again.

I used POR-15 rust preventative paint (silver) and went over as much as I can - been on there ages and zero probs.

Does it need it ? No

Was it worth it ? if you like to work on a 'wipe clean' car then yes.

IMO that's its only advantage - nothing seems to bother POR-15 and ALL road dirt you can just wipe off in seconds and the chassis goes back to a uniform satin silver.

Other parts on the car were galvanised too but not so well, suspension arms for example. Going over the galvanisation with POR-15 just adds another level of protection, even galvanisation gets done over enventually - 1 chip and 1 fraction of a rust spot and it's done for, the paint protects that and also you can go over it nice and easy if it does scratch.

Personally I love the stuff - but as with most things like this 90% of its success is in the preperation !


facebook = [email protected]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...