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Paul Coleman

Bloody rear wheel bearings

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I cannot get the rear wheel bearing out of my hub :crybaby: I have tried putting the hub in the oven at 180C and I've tried heating it up with a blow lamp but I just can't shift the bearing. There is so little inside the bearing to actually get a drift on that I'm thinking of cutting a couple of slots in the lip of the casting which the bearing mates to, so that next time I can actually get to the bearing face to hit the damn thing. I presume my only course of action is to try and press it out? Anybody out there had a similar problem?

Cheers, Paul.


Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

not a tremendous amount of help, but i've just had my rear bearings done, and they were stuck solid...

... the garage took it down the road (to a local fabricators i think) to press it out, and then press the new one back in

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not a tremendous amount of help, but i've just had my rear bearings done, and they were stuck solid...

... the garage took it down the road (to a local fabricators i think) to press it out, and then press the new one back in

Yep, don't get carried away on a 'home' fix and make a mess... I've just used a little local mechanic/garage lockup place for a wheel bearing on another car that needed a 10 ton press to sort out. Left in with him half a day and cost me a tenner...

You might find the first one doesn't have the equipment but I bet they will know who does in your local area, because they will be using them from tiem to time... You often have little local networks of mutual support, which is well worth patching into occasionally.. Especially with a classic or unusual car as they are often more than keen to help with it being a bit different from routine work... My mates even had people volunteering to do free work for him on a Sunday, cos its a bit different and fun... (Mk 2 Jag near concours restoration)..

Jeff

Edited by jeff_hooper

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Okay that confirms my suspicions - thanks. I'll try and find a bit of pipe to fit inside the bearing and then use the vice to see if I can shift it. If not there is a guy near me who has a 30t press so that will be my next port of call. I really should invest in a press for my garage at home!!

Cheers, Paul.

Edited by Paul Coleman

Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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Hi Paul,

Be very careful with the hub. It's very soft metal and they are very difficult to replace!! Might be worth giving the thing a WD40 soak before you take it down to the press.

Pete


Pete '79 S2

LEW Miss September 2009

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Remember that metal can expand when heated so it will only get tighter.

Edited by catty s2

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You'll probably need a press when you reassemble..heat the casting, a domestic oven will do, use a digital oven thermometer to set the temperature first... leave the bearing in the freezer for a day or so on superfreeze, then you have to move quite quickly to get one into the other..it still took 8 tons of pressure to get mine fully home!! If it sticks half way, you are really in trouble!! Peter's dead on, the castings can easily be totalled, so take care. Good luck!!


Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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I have not have had to resort to the following on the Esprit but have had many successes at work, especially when a bearing has totally collapsed and where the housing cannot be placed it a press.

With only the outer ring in place I use an electric welder or MIG to form a weld bead around the groove where the balls used to run (keep away from the housing) When the weld cools it shrinks. Two rows so 2 welds may be required. The outer housing will fall out with no pressing required.

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I managed to scrounge a length of solid bar from work and a guy there is going to turn it down on his lathe for me to make it easier to press out.

Cheers, Paul.


Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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I don't have a press but do have a very handy bearing slide hammer. You set the legs either for internal or external grab, tighten the big nut and it moves the legs onto the bearing securely, then use the slide hammer function to jerk the item free.

Ended up using it to get the lower steering UJ off the upper yesterday, I could have been there for several hours with hammers, metal bars, cold chisels, and crow bars, but having found it was on there solidly, just put the legs into the lower part of the UJ, and it was off with about 6 hits.

The right tools, or at least close to the right tools will make this bearing job a lot easier.

Andy

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I wouldn't be inclined to use a slide hammer or anything that might "shock" the casting.

I tried all manner of things on my offside rear hub/ bearing carrier (whose bearing had collapsed) of my S3 and ended up with a broken casting; not a good day out.

Mike Taylor of Lotusbits.com came to the rescue with a "new" (second hand) carrier with a new bearing installed.

I suspect however that carriers for th S1 are rather more dificult to come by.

Either way, take great care.

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Heat the housing quickly to expand it faster than the bearing.

Use the rod that fits the bearing as suggested. I don't recommend the hammer option as it all needs to be kept absolutely square.

You will also need a piece of pipe slightly larger than the bearing, turn the ends square. The bearing will be pressed down into the pipe.

If it still needs a lot of pressure use the weld technique I described above rather than risk breaking hub. It really works. I have used it with success many times at work,

Edited by GSimpson

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I cannot get the rear wheel bearing out of my hub :crybaby: I have tried putting the hub in the oven at 180C and I've tried heating it up with a blow lamp but I just can't shift the bearing. There is so little inside the bearing to actually get a drift on that I'm thinking of cutting a couple of slots in the lip of the casting which the bearing mates to, so that next time I can actually get to the bearing face to hit the damn thing. I presume my only course of action is to try and press it out? Anybody out there had a similar problem?

Cheers, Paul.

Paul

If all else fails I have access to a 10 ton press that popped my bearings out without a problem.

Mike

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Paul,

If you ever manage to remove the old bearing from the rear hub, refitting the new one is a piece of p*ss. Heat the casting in the oven at 100 degrees for 10 minutes then the replacement bearing will just drop into it and you can retain it with the circlip - job done. Total time to refit the bearing = 15 minutes. 10 minutes waiting for the casting to 'cook', one minute to refit the bearing and four minutes congratulating yourself with a cold beer. Do not use a press to refit the bearing - its not necesarry.

:thumbsup::-)

Jon.

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I managed to scrounge a piece of solid steel bar 65mm in diameter from work and a guy there turned the end down on his lathe for me. With the aid of a press it came out easily. The moral to the story being patience, patience, patience. There's no substitute for having the right tool for the job :thumbup:

Dear Lord grant me patience... but I want them NOW!

Paul.

Edited by Paul Coleman

Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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Nice one Paul :lol:

Well done

I'm dreading doing mine !

Matt


1976 Esprit S1 123G, 1976 Esprit S1 166G, 1976 Esprit S1 170G, 1976 Esprit S1 228G, 1977 Esprit S1 564H, 1978 Esprit S1 326G, 1978 Esprit S1 329G, 1978 Esprit S1 336G, 1981 Esprit S2.2 0991, 1997 Elise S1

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