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Toe in, or toe out? - Suspension/Brakes/Wheels/Hubs/Steering/Geo - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
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Iain

Toe in, or toe out?

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OK - Cars handling has been a little vague - especially at speed when she can wander all over the place (or at least that's what it fels like!)

Really I need to rebuild the suspension with new dampers, springs etc - but I just noticed the front wheels are pointing outwards each side to the front - i.e. toe out?

I thought spec on the 83 TE was 2mm toe in? i.e. fronts should point 'in' ever so slightly?

Any pointers/advice?

Iain

Edited by Iain

"... the Lotus Turbo (Esprit) owner will not only be comfortable in fast company, but will find, more often than not, that he has no company at all!" Road and Track magazine

1983 Turbo Esprit - Silver - 'Lottie' Featured in Classic and Sportscar Aug 2008 and Wheeler Dealers.

1999 Elise - Norfolk Mustard - 'Liz' Daily driver - 221,000 miles and counting!

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Thanks Andy,

So they shouldn't obviously (to naked eye) be toeing out!?

Not really played with suspension/steering before - but simply a case of undoing the locking nuts and adjusting the steering arms?

I figure it looks so obviously out I can prolly make a big improvement just using Mk 1 eyeball at this stage and get it done properly in the week??

I see from other posts you'r a bit of a suspension whiz - if I get stuck - can I give you a call?

Car is being filmed for a TV prog on Thurs and I wand to try and tidy up the handling by then... ^_^

Edited by Iain

"... the Lotus Turbo (Esprit) owner will not only be comfortable in fast company, but will find, more often than not, that he has no company at all!" Road and Track magazine

1983 Turbo Esprit - Silver - 'Lottie' Featured in Classic and Sportscar Aug 2008 and Wheeler Dealers.

1999 Elise - Norfolk Mustard - 'Liz' Daily driver - 221,000 miles and counting!

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If you want a really quick and dirty approach to get you through until you get it done, follow these instructions.

Get 2 bits of really straight wood (check it by eye along the length etc, possible 1" x 1".

Attach them to the wheels using bungee cords, so that you have a few feet of each protruding past the front of the car. Have the wood sitting evenly on each edge of the car, at centre of the hub height. Possibly use items to prop up each end to achieve this.

Measure and mark a point on each piece of wood, a given distance from the front edge of each tyre, then do the same at 15 and 30 inches from that mark.

Measure the distance between (can be outside to outside, inside to inside ect, just be consistent) at each of those pairs of marks.

calculate the difference between the smallest and the first 15 inch step, the the difference between the first15 inch and the second 15 inch.

Hopefully the difference between the pairs will be consistent (if not you're wood is bowed). Either reading should tell you the toe in.

It's rough, but it works, enough to not scrub tyres out, and to handle well enough to get to somebody with a decent set-up, laser/ optical/ string.

By all means call me if you want to, I'll pm the number

Andy

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Thanks Andy!

Actually - there appears to be a little play in the front drivers side wheel bearing - no rumble - so I'm going to take a look at the bearing adjustment...

Also - numpty point two strikes - of course in Mk 1 eyeballing it I'm looking across the wheel/tire at the rear tyres - suddenly struck me that they're prolly a wider track than the fronts!!

Off to check bearings...

I like the method you've suggested - makes complete sense!

Iain

Hmmm...

Wheel bearing ok...

Pressures good...

Wanders off to find some straps...


"... the Lotus Turbo (Esprit) owner will not only be comfortable in fast company, but will find, more often than not, that he has no company at all!" Road and Track magazine

1983 Turbo Esprit - Silver - 'Lottie' Featured in Classic and Sportscar Aug 2008 and Wheeler Dealers.

1999 Elise - Norfolk Mustard - 'Liz' Daily driver - 221,000 miles and counting!

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Iain, are you sure it is a wheel bearing? could it be a track-rod end on the end of the steering rack worn, mine was worn ever so slightly, and it made mine handle totally crap.

when i replaced the ends, i set the toe-in by using a laser level:

the wheels at the rear stick out further than the fronts, so much so that if you rest the level on the front tyres pointing back. the red dot should appear about 5mm on the rubber of the rear tyre.

if you do this both sides, you will know that the steering is equal each side too.

I worked it out by measuring the width of the front and rears outside rubbers, take one from the other, divide by 2, then take off the offset of the laser on the level (center of laser to the measuring flat edge), this tells you how much the dot has to be on the rubber of the tyre to be parallel. mark with chalk where the dot should be and turn the T.R.E. until the dot from the level in on target.

simple trig can tell you how much to alter the figure by to get 1.5* toe-in, but i just turned mine 1/4 a turn each side. then took it to be checked........ it was spot on <_<

hope this helps, just another alternative to the excellent advice of Andy

Edited by Dodgy

Лотос - для тех которые знают разницу

ENIGMA for those who are paranoid or download one :)

 

 

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