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Valvoline Synthetic Racing Oil, safe to use?


Callaway

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I was reading up on the recommended oils on Lotus Esprit World and had a question about the Valvoline oil. Normally I would have bought Mobil 1, however they reformulated their 15W/50 and now call it "extended performance", this being the case I am a little apprehensive to try the new formula. LEW unfortunately does not specify which type of Valvoline's racing oil that they are referring to. I assume they mean synthetic because this generally seems to be the type of oil everyone recommends. I went ahead and ordered two cases from Napa Auto Parts and the containers say that it is for race engines only (claims that the oil is not street legal). According to the container it is not for use in passenger vehicles or "wet clutch" conditions (not sure what exactly "wet clutch" conditions are, but if anyone could elaborate it would be appreciated) as it may damage the catalytic converter. Did I choose the right oil or does LEW mean the conventional type (known as Valvoline Racing Oil VR1). Just want to make sure I got the right one! I have included a screen shot of the blurb on the back of the container. Would it be safe to go ahead and use this oil? Anyone have any experience with this particular product?

*Note* Edited and condensed to make it easier to read, sorry for the confusion!

Blurb Pic:

Also a link to the product on Valvoline's website:

http://www.valvoline.com/pages/products/pr....asp?product=95

Thanks!

-Erik E.

1994 Esprit S4

Edited by Callaway
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your post is very confusing with all the run on and stop short sentences.

so i'll cut to the chase without trying to answer the intermediary questions..

go ahead and use it. i've had it in my car with no complications. may go back to it, as it is among the least expensive. i'm still trying out the field with something different every oil change.

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I would use it. I've never heard of an oil labeled not legal for street use before. Oil does not impact or change emissions standards or safety regulations, which is why many products are labeled not for street use. But if you look at the petigree of the Lotus engines it's blood line is from racing.

As far as a wet clutch, there are some clutches that are immersed in oil. A normal clutch (which is what is in the lotus) is a dry clutch. Typical wet clutch applications is a motorcycle, where the clutch plates are in an oil bath. Because the synthetic oils are so slippery, it could prevent the clutches from gripping and cause them to slip.

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Teigan: You're a real charmer. Ever considered a career in PR?

Erik: It is an odd one. I can't figure out why this isn't street legal unless it needs to pass some kind of hazzardous materials test that they haven't applied for.

The reference to the cat would imply that they are expecting the oil to find its way in to the exhaust, that or to somehow make it more likely for unburnt fuel to find its way there. It might make sense if it were so thin that it was more likely to seep through to the cylinder chambers...

Ho hum! I'd just be concerned that it is giving suitable protection to the engine.

Ian

Ian

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I would use it.  I've never heard of an oil labeled not legal for street use before.  Oil does not impact or change emissions standards or safety regulations, which is why many products are labeled not for street use.  But if you look at the petigree of the Lotus engines it's blood line is from racing. 

As far as a wet clutch, there are some clutches that are immersed in oil.  A normal clutch (which is what is in the lotus) is a dry clutch.  Typical wet clutch applications is a motorcycle, where the clutch plates are in an oil bath.  Because the synthetic oils are so slippery, it could prevent the clutches from gripping and cause them to slip.

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

Ok that makes much more sense now with regards to the "wet clutch" application bit. Thanks for the solid explanation! :huh:

x6gas: Thank you for the reply! You raise a very good point, being that the oil is so thick hopefully this will not be the case! :P

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