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Disassembly of V8 suspension advice

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Over the next few months we want take all the suspension off, sand blast the parts properly and get it all repainted like new then set up the geometry again. If the car is suspended by its jacking points and suspension left to hang can it all be just unbolted without using spring compressors? I

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Having just done this...

The fronts stay together, and can be removed from the car by dropping the lower control arm at the chassis and letting it hang. (support it with something after shock/spring removal) The rears come apart when removed, put a jack under the hub and disconnect the top bolt on the spring, slowly lower until the spring is 'loose' then unbolt the shock from the hub and your done. You don't need a spring compressor to do the front but I'd recommend not doing it yourself.

The factory shocks are not worth cleaning up and should never have been fitted originally, IMHO...I put together a double adjustable aluminum coilover setup with Eibach spring, all four corners. Much lighter and vastly superior.

post-1829-1212455202.jpg

Edited by 97-Esprit V8

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http://www.jonathanedwards.pwp.blueyonder....nance/index.htm

Any use ?

Dont sandblast everything as it's galvanised and you'll take it off and ruin the protection !

Do what I did and use a pressure washer on it and then scrub the bugga with a pad thingy you use to clean an oven with (non metal) and have it painted.

Some parts are tight fitting as well so they might need assembly before painting which is why I brushed mine on becuase I could control the ammount of paint - if you go overboard the radius arm will not fit back onto the hub carrier for example.

Also worth a read :

http://www.lotusespritworld.com/EGuides/EM...ubCarriers.html

http://www.lotusespritworld.com/EGuides/EM...on_fitting.html

Also done the fronts too recently which are harder to do.

My advice to begin with is take ONE corner off at a time - take your time and look at what's going on. Oh and renew all the bushes, you might as well.

Personally I would not suspend the car for any length of time with the force of the springs pushng down on the suspension either. The shocks are actually fairly easy to dis-engage and remove but imo the weight of the brakes etc should be supported if possible - even if you use a rope or something to hang them off the chassis.

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Having just done this...

The fronts stay together, and can be removed from the car by dropping the lower control arm at the chassis and letting it hang. (support it with something after shock/spring removal) The rears come apart when removed, put a jack under the hub and disconnect the top bolt on the spring, slowly lower until the spring is 'loose' then unbolt the shock from the hub and your done. You don't need a spring compressor to do the front but I'd recommend not doing it yourself.

The factory shocks are not worth cleaning up and should never have been fitted originally, IMHO...I put together a double adjustable aluminum coilover setup with Eibach spring, all four corners. Much lighter and vastly superior.

Hi thanks for this great advice :devil: It would be a shame to biff the original 350 shocks for aftermarket ones if they are still working fine. But once off we can inspect much better and go from there.

http://www.jonathanedwards.pwp.blueyonder....nance/index.htm

Any use ?

Dont sandblast everything as it's galvanised and you'll take it off and ruin the protection !

Do what I did and use a pressure washer on it and then scrub the bugga with a pad thingy you use to clean an oven with (non metal) and have it painted.

Some parts are tight fitting as well so they might need assembly before painting which is why I brushed mine on becuase I could control the ammount of paint - if you go overboard the radius arm will not fit back onto the hub carrier for example.

Also worth a read :

http://www.lotusespritworld.com/EGuides/EM...ubCarriers.html

http://www.lotusespritworld.com/EGuides/EM...on_fitting.html

Also done the fronts too recently which are harder to do.

My advice to begin with is take ONE corner off at a time - take your time and look at what's going on. Oh and renew all the bushes, you might as well.

Personally I would not suspend the car for any length of time with the force of the springs pushng down on the suspension either. The shocks are actually fairly easy to dis-engage and remove but imo the weight of the brakes etc should be supported if possible - even if you use a rope or something to hang them off the chassis.

Thanks Jonathan, this is great stuff. I just want to clean it up like new and make sure all the surface rust is gone so I dont have to go there again. The only time I want to go there again is to maintain a clean underneath which I like to do once a year. Cars dont really rust here with no salt on roads so getting a warrent of fitness make the inspecter go nuts when they see rust..

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Bear in mind that the 350 shocks and springs are completely different to the standard V8. The car is set up differently and the chassis has differences.

The 350 shocks are actually painted a nice shade of blue (under all the crud!)

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If you're going to paint, I'd recommend using POR-15. I love this stuff and once it's cured it is the hardest paint I've ever seen and solvents or engine degreasers won't touch it. If the pieces are prepared properly they will never rust or corrode again. Not cheap though but well worth the cost.

Be sure to replace all the bushings and maybe even ball joints and tie rod ends while you're there.

IMG_0642.jpg

IMG_0652.jpg

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I'm about to start the same project on my 88, but I'm having it powder coated, your wishbones may be galvanised, but mine are definatly not, a lot of surface rust, hence the project, I am also pulling the radiators out, just to check, but the frame and stays will get done, as will the rear subframe for the exhaust, I'm also changing the top and bottom ball joints, and replacing all the bushes with the polyurathene ones.

If I learn anything I'll let you know. Oh I'm doing the brakes too.

Roger

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Having just done this...

The fronts stay together, and can be removed from the car by dropping the lower control arm at the chassis and letting it hang. (support it with something after shock/spring removal) The rears come apart when removed, put a jack under the hub and disconnect the top bolt on the spring, slowly lower until the spring is 'loose' then unbolt the shock from the hub and your done. You don't need a spring compressor to do the front but I'd recommend not doing it yourself.

The factory shocks are not worth cleaning up and should never have been fitted originally, IMHO...I put together a double adjustable aluminum coilover setup with Eibach spring, all four corners. Much lighter and vastly superior.

post-1829-1212455202.jpg

Could you post what QA1 part numbers for the shocks you used are? I am looking into the same setup just not sure which shocks to choose.

Thanks

Ray

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If you're going to paint, I'd recommend using POR-15. I love this stuff and once it's cured it is the hardest paint I've ever seen and solvents or engine degreasers won't touch it. If the pieces are prepared properly they will never rust or corrode again. Not cheap though but well worth the cost.

Be sure to replace all the bushings and maybe even ball joints and tie rod ends while you're there.

Jim full credit to you they look fantastic. :) We have some POR-15 left over from panting part on the 89Turbo and of course Simons Hotrod. Most def good long lasting stuff.

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Could you post what QA1 part numbers for the shocks you used are? I am looking into the same setup just not sure which shocks to choose.

Thanks

Ray

Ray,

I got your PM, to answer I am putting together these parts as a complete kit which I intend to market, I have discussed with Carrera regarding purchasing the parts wholesale and would most likely be able to sell the setup cheaper or the same as the parts retail for separately, that is my goal. I don't want to post all of the details regarding my setup, since I spend a good deal of time figuring it all out, hope you understand.

I will also be releasing the upper and lower rear control arm setup for sale after I finish my road course testing to ensure everything works to my approval. They can be made with heim joints on both ends but for street use and track day fun the polyurethane inner mount is best. Stiction in the factory outer bushings is unbelievible to the point of puzzlement as to why it would be designed that way...Another benefit is the ability to adjust toe without shims

post-1829-1212720580.jpg

post-1829-1212720682.jpg

post-1829-1212720739.jpg

I hope it's ok to post this, if not it let me know.

The post above with all the suspension arms painted makes me want to go do the same...lol

Paul

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"hub carrier vs. me" , it's 0:1 so i won (for now, as one side is still in place ..) :lol:

good luck to you Kylie ! , and all of us who have to face with this special point in life with an Esprit .

But it does cost me several 1/2 UNF locking nuts (not very common in my area !) and the stud gets some marks from the drill, as i reduced the tension in the inner part of the totally rusted/weared bushing.. :)

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I used POR-15 and the rust is now starting to creep back in, not a big problem because in 2-3 years time it all comes off again anyways for maintenance and should only take a few hrs to re-furb.

However.................................if I were to do this again I would have galvanised it first. I have a home made pikey (oohhh I'm in trouble now) electroplating kit which is OK but doesn't get good results especially on cmoplex parts - if I have any new parts in bare metal (after shot blasting) I'll definatly get them professionally galvanised or plated, with POR-15 over the top it should be good for a few decades. I painted a lot of the Esprit's chassis over the galvanisation and it's funny how durable it is and what a nice finish it leaves.

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update: other side hub_ carrier stud is also out now. Have used the LEW advice with the original locknut as part of an 'pull type' tool with wrench sockets and distance shims... . No cut of the stud was necessary -as i have used directed heat on the inner bush part (as seen in the picture). The rest of the bush does burn, but thats not a problem (as long as your neighbors not at home.... )

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Agreed Jonathan, that is the route we are hoping to take. I dont want to have to go back there again, so do it once do it right :)

Spent yesterday just taking more surface rust and chunks of dirt off under there on the lower arms etc. Those wire drill bits are good arent they for larger surface areas :lol: Just as messy though making clouds of rust and dirt smoke - yuck!!

Gunter nice work keep the pics coming all good as I will be picking your brains soon when it comes to this.

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Kylie, it's not a big problem LEW advice was good. But you don't need to cut the stud ! The rear most eye of the hub carrier is an steel/aluminum connection. It's some oxidizing in it -but aluminum is relatively soft on that surface . The split bush in front does come out together with the stud (it does stuck on the stud as it is an steel/steel connection - there is massive rust under it... ). But the split bush can slight (with a lot of resistance -add some thin oil/rust remove liquid into the gab between carrier and bush) in the aluminum.

What makes an real problem for me was the rest of the suspension bush in the middle of the carrier. The rubber was almost gone. but the inner metal part was totally rusted together with the stud. I managed to burn the rest of the rubber to ashes. Then you have enough space to heat the metal part that it glows red. hit it with an hammer (not much , as the aluminum carrier does not like stresses !) and let it cool down. Some more of the rust removal oil and you can pull the stud out with the original lock nuts and some wrench sockets as distance plates.

So all what you need is an 19mm (3/4 inch) spanner, wrench+sockets, oil (WD40 for example), an gas welder tool, an 200g hammer , time, and lots of patience ( up to 14 hours under the car port/ parking place in my case, but it saved me more than 300 GBP per hub-carrier, around 30 Euros (without transport/tax) per stud. All i need is new 1/2 inch UNF locknut's -as those are softer than the stud and the treats of two from one side does only last to pull the stud out on one side... ) See 120Nm advice in LEW !!

Edited by G

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I will also be releasing the upper and lower rear control arm setup for sale after I finish my road course testing to ensure everything works to my approval. They can be made with heim joints on both ends but for street use and track day fun the polyurethane inner mount is best. Stiction in the factory outer bushings is unbelievible to the point of puzzlement as to why it would be designed that way...Another benefit is the ability to adjust toe without shims

Paul

Paul, if you alter the length of the lower control arm on one side and make it a different length to the other wouldn't that alter the thrust line slightly?

I had considered the same as you've done (same outcome different approach), but decided that effectively moving a wheel in a few mm would move the thrust line across at the rear and result in the wheel which is moved in more than the other being set-back.

Something similar would also happen at the front, but I suppose something could be done to the front wishbone to alter that (make the front tube adjustable?)

Looking at the ones you've made, it might be worth considering making the hemi / rose joint off centre, as I found the original units were not perfectly in line and better alignment with less force on the poly / rubber bush could be achieved by offsetting one end slightly.

Andy

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Kylie - being a bit of a techy (well you sound like one) try an electrolysis bath to strip rust.

Obviously it's a naff idea on galvanised stuff but you just pop the stuff into an alkalie bath and put 2 probes in there - one is attached to the bit you want to strip and the other is attached to a sacraficial lump of steel.

Power on, and you're set - the rust moves from one place to the other and it's incredibly good (gets into everything).

I stripped most of my rust off the car when I was asleep or enjoying a nice sunny day in the garden with one of those lemonade / ice cream drinks :respect:

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simple citric acid powder in a tray with warm water does the same , and you need no external power for it. Just an warm room with good fresh air exchange... .

It is ecological and can be disposed into the toilet !

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Does the acid eat the base metal though ?

Thats the nice thign about the electrolysis is that you can leave it in there for ages and nothing will happen to the part where as corrosive agents will start to errode everything.

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normally the acid is so soft that nothing else happens, but don't try this on cast-zinc based constructions (such as *Matchbox* toy cars) .It will "eat" the structure.

But you can regulate it by mixture with more water. The steel will be gray, or if you flush it with some water and dry it with soft paper it is shiny. But be careful and don't touch it with bar fingers, in contact with your sweat it will spot those points immediately on the clear surface.

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I like the idea of the electrolysis bath, but not being a techie its all a bit like magic. Can you tell us a bit more - voltage, concentration of the alkali, what do you make the alkali up from, which polarity is connected to what, etc, etc.

I'd love to have a go at this but need a bit of help to get started....

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Have a search on the net for electrolysis rust removal for ideas becuase I cheated and used regulated current/voltage PSU.

I used a 60 litre container, filled 1/2 with water (pref warm) with 2 table spoons of soap flakes in it - job done.

PSU wise I think I had it ~ 12volts and few amps - the thing is I used a regulated current PSU from work which was fairly expensive, if you put a normal PSU in there it might shoot up and go bang so be careful. The amount of metal inside also affects the current draw, the more metal the more current you need to 'push' the rust off. Upping the power (current or voltage) increases the speed at which it strips, couldn't see any detrimental affect at all other than the water got dirty quicker.

Works an absolute TREAT and for almost zero cost (esp if you nick next door's power OR better still, works hahaha :whistle:)

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