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Hi guys,

I have the chance to purchase a one owner, all original, 1982, low mileage (22,000) Turbo which has been stored for 18 years. Over the last couple of years the owner has spent a fair bit of money having various parts replaced which had siezed/ deteriorated whilst in storage (Clutch assy, master cylinders, handbrake, cables, hoses, alloy water pipes etc, etc, also had the cambelt changed while the engine was out).

The body is great with no damage but in my opinion ( I'm very fussy) it would require a respray to be right, the interior although covered in dust is in very good original condition

My questions are, How rare is the dry sump version and why did Lotus change to wet sump (were there problems with the dry sump) also, and I know this is a very difficult question to answer, but how much roughly, should I be paying for the car.

Here's a couple of photos of the car, I'll post some others when I get decent ones

Edited by mercman
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First of all, that car isn't a dry sump model if it's genuinely 1982, as only the first G Turbo cars were. Lotus moved away from dry sump as the oil level check process is more involved e.g. car level, engine switched off for a precise time etc. Lotus found owners either weren't bothered checking correctly or didn't bother at all. This lead to a number of engine probs which were cropping up as warranty issues. Lotus swapped to wet sump as the performance benefits (if any) of a dry sump were far outweighed by the hassle caused.

Now as to value, with the dry sumpers, it's not the engine so much that people value, more other things. They had a suspension carried over from the earlier S2.2 cars and so sit a little lower, and in most peoples view look better for it. Additionally because of this they were equiped with the 4 stud split rim Compomotive wheel from the Essex Turbo, which many people regard as a better looking wheel than the one piece BBS cross spoke fitted to later cars. As the BBS is 5 stud the two wheel types are not interchangeable.

Additionally some (not all) were fitted with the Roof Stereo from the Essex Turbo. It's these that make the dry sump desirable, along with the fact that they were some of the earliest turbo cars made by Lotus.

As to value of the blue one? Haven't a clue! You'll need to tell us a lot more about the car, as condition far outweighs age/mileage.

Regards

Mat

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As I recall, the dry sump was expensive, and seen as unnecessary on the road. I don't think it was problematic (though some dry sump owners might have different stories.)

From the Jeremy Walton Book Lotus Esprit (1982), p. 76,

As has been explained, the Esprit's original 2-liter 907 engine called for a revised lubrication system to cope with the higher cornering demands. Rudd fees it is probable that the Turbo engine could have lived on in we sump form, but they opted for a full dry sump system 'for the long distances and high speeds that are possible with the Turbo. Quite honestly it's not necessary to dry sump unless you are really thrashing the motor. It grieves me to see the oil cooler virtually bulging on a dry sump system when it's being stared from cold!'

Edited by JonFairhurst
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First of all, that car isn't a dry sump model if it's genuinely 1982, as only the first G Turbo cars were. Lotus moved away from dry sump as the oil level check process is more involved e.g. car level, engine switched off for a precise time etc. Lotus found owners either weren't bothered checking correctly or didn't bother at all. This lead to a number of engine probs which were cropping up as warranty issues. Lotus swapped to wet sump as the performance benefits (if any) of a dry sump were far outweighed by the hassle caused.

Now as to value, with the dry sumpers, it's not the engine so much that people value, more other things. They had a suspension carried over from the earlier S2.2 cars and so sit a little lower, and in most peoples view look better for it. Additionally because of this they were equiped with the 4 stud split rim Compomotive wheel from the Essex Turbo, which many people regard as a better looking wheel than the one piece BBS cross spoke fitted to later cars. As the BBS is 5 stud the two wheel types are not interchangeable.

Additionally some (not all) were fitted with the Roof Stereo from the Essex Turbo. It's these that make the dry sump desirable, along with the fact that they were some of the earliest turbo cars made by Lotus.

As to value of the blue one? Haven't a clue! You'll need to tell us a lot more about the car, as condition far outweighs age/mileage.

The car is definately a 1982, Iv'e seen the original purchase order, it also comes up as 1982 on the HPI and the chassis starts 0082 (I'm not sure about the amount of zeros as I didn't note the number down). It's definately a dry sump and is fitted with the 5 stud BBS wheels (still has the original tyres it came out of the factory with). The radio is in the centre consul.

The engine / engine bay could be doing with a good clean and although it starts and runs ok it will need a good service.

It also passed an mot not that long ago.

Other than needing a good clean inside and out it's actually in very good condition,

I'll post another couple of pics of the interior and the rear wheel.

Edited by mercman
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that does look nice i have to say, if you feel its worth the price for what you want to spend then buy it, be nice to see it being used a little. just make sure you budjet for a complete health check at a lotus specialist and a good service and for any parts that need replacing prior to mot etc.

budget a couple of grand for immediate work i would say.

other than that its about what you want, if it feels right it usually is. regrets a bugger to live with i know, theres a certain car i wish i never walked away from!

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That was absolutely, definitely, positively not a dry sump car out of the factory. It may have had a relacement dry sump engine fitted at a later date. What information do you have to verify that it has a dry sump engine?

It would be quite rare to see a car retrofitted with a dry sump engine. I know of at least 2 dry sump cars post dated to wet sump engines. There were I think only about 110 dry sump cars made, so to actually find a dry sump engine spare is quite a rare thing. Something doesn't seem quite right to me.

Having said that if you can verify it's a dry sump engine, and more importantly why it is fitted, then I wouldn't let that put me off the car if everything else checks out.

Regards

Mat

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Hi all. I see no reason that the car is not a dry sump model .Recently saw one on ebay not sure if it was a 81 or 82 car .fitted with roof console dry sump engine air con .As i use to own a early dry sump car my self 81 Year .Roof console BBS Wheels .My thoughts are Lotus wanted to build 100 Essex Turbos .Could not sell that many .so used up the remaining Essex spec features as extras .The car on ebay sold for 35OO.which i thought was a good price .I say go for it as it sounds like a great car .A friend use to own a x reg dry sump car .Good luck Mercman.Ithink from memory my chassis no was 62.If i can be of any more help just ask Cheers Mike

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mercman you do know dry sump don't mean if you pull out the dipstick and there no oil in it, its a dry sump!?? lol only joking Sounds a great car but people do often get confused some people try to sell turbo cars that are N/A cars with body kits etc. Matk and others really know their stuff so I would dig deeper so you know what you might end up with if you do buy it!

Buddsy

PS Do you have any engine pics?

Sorry, no engine pics yet, I only took the ones posted.

Just got of the phone with a guy at Lotus who said that it was certainly possible for an 82 to be a dry sump car, he took the chassis and engine numbers and is going to phone me back once he checks the production records for the car.

How does the chassis number break down, i.e. what do the numbers and codes mean, I believe the start numbers (in my case 082) mean it's an 82 but what about the rest

Edited by mercman
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Mercman,

I don't know the asking price of the car but if you are looking not only for dry sump cars take a look at http://www.esprit4sale.co.uk/Sale/UsedCarCentre.html

there is a very interesting Turbo esprit 1983 in essex colour/style.

1983 Turbo Esprit

This car has had everything done over the past couple of years, engine rebuild using HC block and pistons, 39600 miles, new paint , new interior, brake refurb, new lights all round, new downpipe and wastegate pipe, new suspention and bushes, new header tank, wheel refurb and tyers. not taken out in rain and only used in summer. The car looks and drives supurb.

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What answer are you looking for here?

Didn't you notice the huge problems the forum has had over the past week Dodgy?

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

For forum issues, please contact the Moderators. I will aim to respond to emails/PM's Mon-Fri 9-6 GMT. 

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i only posted it last night (i think), i thought all was ok now?

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It is now, wasn't 100% last night.

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

For forum issues, please contact the Moderators. I will aim to respond to emails/PM's Mon-Fri 9-6 GMT. 

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:( thanks for that Bibs :)

All i can remember about the post was saying,

a lot of the dry sump cars were fitted with wet sumps after they were delivered to customers by request of them, owing i think to people not getting there heads around the way to check and top up, leading to over filling.

Even though the dry sumps were around for about a year, they went through evolution during that time.

the very early and rare ones, are to the same spec as the essex, then the modifications came in as they were produced:

the loover was changed to a twin support from a single center one like the essex

the wheels where changed to solid 5 stud BBS from the 4 stud splitrim compomotives - this also meant the link and trailing arms of the suspension were changed too.

the washer jets on the later cars was changed to a 'post jet' from inbuilt jets in the bonnet.

even the way the engine cover is mounted is different across the range.

Dry sump cars are rare, but ones with split rim compomotives are rarer and seem to be more desirable.

Лотос - для тех которые знают разницу

ENIGMA for those who are paranoid or download one :)

 

 

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"Dry sump cars are rare, but ones with split rim compomotives are rarer and seem to be more desirable."

Dodgy,

I like it. Keep up the hype and my car could be worth all the trouble :(

Trevor.

post-4788-1217544776.jpg

I'll get around to it at some point.

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