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What made you happy today?


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After 5 years of hard work and graft my Downton mini fired to life this morning and sounded absolutely amazing, everything has been rebuilt so big smiles. Just lots of loose ends to finish off no

I ordered a new Lotus, having cancelled the Porsche. That makes me happy

My Dad came through his open-heart surgery successfully.  

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In London for the ATP finals with my wife. part of a treat for her birthday. just watching Murray warm up...  C'mon Andy...

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Alcohol. Sex. Tobacco. Drugs. Chocolate.  Meh! NOTHING in this world is as addictive as an Evora +0. It's not for babies!    

The first guy to ride a bull for fun, was a true hero. The second man to follow him was truly nuts!   

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This should cheer most of us up...and the Great Chocolate Eating season is upon us!!! Take the opportunity to increase your cognitive abilities...

 

THE MAGICAL THING THAT EATING CHOCOLATE DOES TO THE BRAIN.....

In the mid 1970s, psychologist Merrill Elias began tracking the cognitive abilities of more than a thousand people in the state of New York. The goal was fairly specific: to observe the relationship between people's blood pressure and brain performance. And for decades he did just that, eventually expanding the Maine-Syracuse Longitudinal Study (MSLS) to observe other cardiovascular risk factors, including diabetes, obesity, and smoking. There was never an inkling that his research would lead to any sort of discovery about chocolate.

And yet, 40 years later, it seems to have done just that.

Late in the study, Elias and his team had an idea. Why not ask the participants what they were eating too? It wasn't unreasonable to wonder if what someone ate might add to the discussion. Diets, after all, had been shown to affect the risk factors Elias was already monitoring. Plus, they had this large pool of participants at their disposal, a perfect chance to learn a bit more about the decisions people were making about food.

The researchers incorporated a new questionnaire into the sixth wave of their data collection, which spanned the five years between 2001 and 2006 (there have been seven waves in all, each conducted in five year intervals). The questionnaire gathered all sorts of information about the dietary habits of the participants. And the dietary habits of the participants revealed an interesting pattern.

"We found that people who eat chocolate at least once a week tend to perform better cognitively," said Elias. "It's significant--it touches a number of cognitive domains."

The findings, chronicled in a new study published last month, come largely thanks to the interest of Georgina Crichton, a nutrition researcher at the University of South Australia, who led the analysis. Others had previously shown that eating chocolate correlated with various positive health outcomes, but few had explored the treat's effect on the brain and behavior, and even fewer had observed the effect of habitual chocolate consumption. This, Crichton knew, was a unique opportunity.

 

Not only was the sample size large--a shade under 1,000 people when the new questionnaire was added--but the cognitive data was perhaps the most comprehensive of any study ever undertaken.

The chocolate effect

In the first of two analyses, Crichton, along with Elias and Ala'a Alkerwi, an epidemiologist at the Luxembourg Institute of Health, compared the mean scores on various cognitive tests of participants who reported eating chocolate less than once a week and those who reported eating it at least once a week. They found "significant positive associations" between chocolate intake and cognitive performance, associations which held even after adjusting for various variables that might have skewed the results, including age, education, cardiovascular risk factors, and dietary habits.

In scientific terms, eating chocolate was significantly associated with superior "visual-spatial memory and [organisation], working memory, scanning and tracking, abstract reasoning, and the mini-mental state examination."

But as Crichton explained, these functions translate to every day tasks, "such as remembering a phone number, or your shopping list, or being able to do two things at once, like talking and driving at the same time."

 

In the second analysis, the researchers tested whether chocolate consumption predicted cognitive ability, or if it was actually the other way around--that people with better performing brains tended to gravitate toward chocolate. In order to do this, they zeroed in on a group of more than 300 participants who had taken part in the first four waves of the MSLS as well as the sixth, which included the dietary questionnaire. If better cognitive ability predicted chocolate consumption, there should have been an association between the people's cognitive performance prior to answering the questionnaire and their reported chocolate intake. But there wasn't.

"It's not possible to talk about causality, because that's nearly impossible to prove with our design," said Elias. "But we can talk about direction. Our study definitely indicates that the direction is not that cognitive ability affects chocolate consumption, but that chocolate consumption affects cognitive ability."

What's going on?

Why exactly eating chocolate is associated with improved brain function Crichton can't say with absolute certainty. Nor can Elias, who admits that he expected to observe the opposite effect--that chocolate, given its sugar content, would be correlated with stunted rather than enhanced cognitive abilities. But they have a few ideas.

They know, for instance, that nutrients called cocoa flavanols, which are found naturally in cocoa, and thus chocolate, seem to have a positive effect on people's brains. In 2014, one concluded that eating the nutrient can "reduce some measures of age-related cognitive dysfunction." A 2011 study, meanwhile found that cocoa flavanols "positively influence psychological processes." The suspicion is that eating the nutrient increases blood flow to the brain, which in turn improves a number of its functions.

Chocolate, like both coffee and tea, also has methylxanthines, plant produced compounds that enhance various bodily functions. Among them: concentration levels. A number of studies have shown this, including one in 2004, and another in 2005.

Experts have known about the wonders of eating chocolate for some time. A lot of previous research has shown that there are, or at least could be, immediate cognitive benefits from eating chocolate. But rarely, if ever, have researchers been able to observe the impact of habitual chocolate eating on the brain.

The takeaway isn't that everyone should rush to stuff their faces with the magical sweet. "I think what we can say for now is that you can eat small amounts of chocolate without guilt if you don't substitute chocolate for a normal balanced healthy diet," Elias said.

The research, he says, isn't finished yet. There are more questions to ask, more answers to pursue.

"We didn't look at dark chocolate and lighter chocolate separately," he pointed out. "That next study could tell us a lot more about what's going on."

"We also only looked at people who were eating chocolate never or rarely versus once a week or more than once a week," he added. "I'd really like to see what happens when people eat tons of chocolate."

 

(Culled from the Washington Post)

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Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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I am happy... I have been celebrating for almost a week straight.!!!!

I finally got the patent approved on my new engine design.  :-D

*dances a happy dance*

Have a look...   ask questions...  

http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&p=1&S1=20160326952.PGNR.&OS=DN/20160326952&RS=DN/20160326952

 

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1 minute ago, Clive59 said:

Can we get pics too? Sounds very interesting

There is an "Images" button on the patent site.. and you can use the yellow arrows on the left to scroll thru them...  Let me see if I can just extract a few and post them here to save time..

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2 hours ago, hyteck9 said:

I am happy... I have been celebrating for almost a week straight.!!!!

I finally got the patent approved on my new engine design.  :-D

*dances a happy dance*

Have a look...   ask questions...  

http://appft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO2&Sect2=HITOFF&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-adv.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PG01&p=1&S1=20160326952.PGNR.&OS=DN/20160326952&RS=DN/20160326952

 

Wow well done :thumbsup: 

what HP does this achieve ??

Only here once

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Fingers crossed for you. If there's any promise in it - I'm sure a car manufacturer will buy it up and shelve it....... we had a family friend years ago who did some clever stuff with cyclinder heads achieving 100mpg - that was bought up by BP and hidden from the world

Only here once

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1 minute ago, Barrykearley said:

Fingers crossed for you. If there's any promise in it - I'm sure a car manufacturer will buy it up and shelve it....... we had a family friend years ago who did some clever stuff with cyclinder heads achieving 100mpg - that was bought up by BP and hidden from the world

wow..  yes please tell me more about that.!!  Very exciting.

 

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27 minutes ago, hyteck9 said:

There is an "Images" button on the patent site.. and you can use the yellow arrows on the left to scroll thru them...  Let me see if I can just extract a few and post them here to save time..

Sorry but cant get the immages to open. Can you post them as sounds very interesting. Well done.

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I have had many discussions about this design since it was published... and many are wanting it to be a "traditional 4 stroke" engine.  It is not.  Never intended to be.  It has other potentials which are not immediately clear as the patent is desired to be as broad-brush-stroke and generic as possible.

The model I have in hand has a length and width smaller than a laptop..  has a 330cc "combustion chamber"  and intake ports so large you can just about drop a golf ball thru it.  The integrated timing set and transmission box can be adjusted for various output ratios or extended for more forward or reverse gears like any other manual trans.

 

 

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Just now, Clive59 said:

Don't you need compression to get efficiency from the air/fuel mixture ignition?

yup...  and this is where the conversation gets interesting.  haha.  :-)

keep thinking.. and I will chime in with more soon.

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Argh! I am trying to write code as you present this. An interesting diversion nontheless.

Are you planning on some forced induction from both sides?

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An electric or rotary driven compressor would be an interesting way of adding compression and controlling intake that could be adjusted to change fuel mix ratio instead of a butterfly.

Seems a sensible way of starting the rotors as well using compressed air instead of a starter motor.

Edited by Fueltheburn
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2 minutes ago, Fueltheburn said:

Seems a sensible way of starting the rotors as well using compressed air instead of a starter motor.

More like a jet startup.

I was thinking along similar lines. But don't think there would be enough pressure differential to actually rotate enough before stopping midway.

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Whaaat?  An "engine" with no seals, no compression, no cooling channels, no oil channels..  what a waste?!

unless...  as you clever peeps have stated..  you super-charged it. and I mean A LOT of boost.  not 15 psi or 18 psi..  keep going.  waaay up.  there is no mechanical compression limitations to stop you so keep going..

The theory is you will hit a "sweet spot" in which the boost pressure, coming in from oposing sides, will pressurize the entire box..  in effect sealing the tolerance gaps, cooling the rotors, and providing compression for your air fuel mix because boost..  is..  compression..

I dont have the kind of expensive simulation software needed to know what that sweet spot is..  but I think it will work..  (and  i'm open to collaboration.)

I'm thrilled to have made it this far on my own. :)

 

Edited by hyteck9
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Sooooo ... question is what is the efficiency likely to be?

Is the idea behind this as a generator i.e small power unit for a hybrid vehicle/house to charge cells or as a direct drive to gearbox?

What kind of bhp or torque for the model size and can the size be upped continuously without diminishing losses i.e will the power follow the percentage the size has been scaled up?

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Just now, Fueltheburn said:

Sooooo ... question is what is the efficiency likely to be?

Is the idea behind this as a generator i.e small power unit for a hybrid vehicle/house to charge cells or as a direct drive to gearbox?

What kind of bhp or torque for the model size and can the size be upped continuously without diminishing losses i.e will the power follow the percentage the size has been scaled up?

The design should scale very easily within any kind of reasonable application.

Since the unit free spins (save a very little bit of resistance from the gear set) The efficiency should be quite high, minus the work done by the supercharger on the input side.  Many car companies have incorporated electric superchargers now , because they are so very very efficient.  The "work" transferred to the rotors is based on the rotor "cut-out" shape you choose.  the one pictured here is a 2.5x differential between the long and short sides... but it was chosen because it made the most visual sense on the patent...  not necessarily because it is the most efficient.  The rotors are all spinning in the same direction and at the same speed.  so even if they do "interfere" at some point the effects should be minimal.  The "power stroke" can be adjusted by shrinking the rotor cut-out to less than 90 desgrees of the rotor diameter, as well as moving the exhaust ports further from the center of the case side.

If you really really want to get your mind wrapped up in a mess...  think about all this and then add Direct Liquid Compression Injection to increase all effects.

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Very impressive. Now for the task of getting it out in the world; best of luck with that.

After all the clever engine design, I'm a bit reluctant to throw in some trivial fun with numbers but this just occurred to me this evening so I'll go with it.

I was half-listening to the TV news and heard someone prattle on about measuring employment in person years when it occurred to me that Lotus ownership could just as well be measured in Lotus-years. So I decided to do a quick and dirty calculation, i.e. with a bit of rounding, of where I am in total Lotus-years compared to my age. It's quite close.

I've had my Europa since July 1977 so that rounds to 39.5 Lotus-years. The Esprit since October 2003, giving 13 Lotus-years and the Elise since March 2010 for 6.5 Lotus-years. That gives me a total of 59 Lotus-years. I will turn 63 in February so my current age of 62.75 is only 3.75 more than my Lotus-years. With three cars I'm accumulating Lotus-years at a 3:1 ratio to real time.so I should catch up to my age in about 18 months. Something to look forward to and it will give me another flimsy excuse to crack open a good beer in mid-summer, as if I need one. 

 

Mike

'97 V8

'73 Europa TC

'10 Elise SC

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reminds of the childrens math riddle.  

if you are 1 and your brother is 10... he is 10 times older than you.  In five years he will be 15 and you will be 5.  now he is only 3 time older than you.  In another 5 years, he will be 20 and you will be 10.  He is only twice as old as you.  At what age will you catch up completely?

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Well after countless CV's posted off, probably well over 100 positions viewed I have been told I am short listed for a job and have to attend an interview. Fingers crossed that it will come through. Seven months of no income have certainly hammered the savings. No NHS payments or DWP for me as I am not an immigrant, don't have 20 kids at my ankles. Ooop's, they forget I have been paying high tax's for too many year's to count and that I still have a mortgage, council tax, electricity, central heating fuel etc to pay as does most people. Oh yes and we have too eat.

Finger's crossed this one comes  through.

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Good luck mate! 

I heard a very good friend is in remission from cancer, I shed tears, wonderful news :D

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

For forum issues, please contact the Moderators. I will aim to respond to emails/PM's Mon-Fri 9-6 GMT. 

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