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82 Dry sump Turbo Esprit Restoration - Page 4 - Esprit 'Project & Restoration' Room - The Lotus Forums #ForTheOwners Jump to content


82 Dry sump Turbo Esprit Restoration


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Well its been almost another year since my last post. I haven't managed to get the sideskirts off yet. The ducting for the brakes at the rear is fibreglassed into the body and will reqire cutting to free off. I'm not confident to do that just yet.

 

I have today spent a few hours removing the last few bits attached to the body. The only large item still to remove is the windscreen. I've bought a tool to remove but may get a professional in to take it out. It's gone a bit cloudy on one edge and at the top so I guess its delaminating which is bad news.

 

The rear bulkhead has also been damp and the plywood is starting to delaminate near the speaker hole on the passenger side. I guess that glassing over would be preferable to removing and replacing the lower bulkhead panel?

It's getting there......

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I used a thin twisted 'cheese grater' wire to remove my windscreens - got off eBay from a windscreen tool company. Drill a pilot hole in the sealant, thread it through and attach some wooden blocks on each end. Then saw carefully saw it out.  Worked like a charm. I previously bought a cutting tool which was useless as the sealant was old and hard.

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Thanks Jon, I may try that method, I do have a tool purchased from eBay but I don't think it will touch the sealant.

 

:)

It's getting there......

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  • 1 year later...

Here we go again.

Its been another year and the only thing to show for it is a refurbished oil pump. Did I mention that this resto was moving at a glacial pace?

I uncovered the car again today to take another look at the sills. I think I need to be brave and start cutting. I believe that its only the internal ends which are glassed in.

If anyone knows for sure or have removed thier Turbo Esprit sills, please let me know how you did it :) 

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It's getting there......

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@ChrisJ - no, I would feel a bit odd turning up in my Jap estate car :( 

After my earlier posting I felt I was being a little lazy.

Back down the garden and I decided to trace the decals so I have a reference for where they need to be reapplied. I also drilled out a few more rivets in the drivers side sill and around the door frame. 

:) 

It's getting there......

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Whilst you lot were enjoying the superb summer weather at Brooklands, I was hard at it taking my car to pieces.

I've now removed the front passenger side suspension for the first time in 21 years. The rather large spider who had taken up residence in the front brake calliper was none too pleased to loose his home.

I was pleasently suprised by how easily it all came apart. I gave it a good soaking with GT85 yesterday and today was a breeze for the impact wrench.

 

front brake caliper with cobweb_resized.jpg

front brake disc and caliper with cobweb_ resized.jpg

front stub axle - hub removed_ resized.jpg

tope suspension arms and stub axle removed from car_resized.jpg

It's getting there......

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I've also removed the gear selector mechanism, linkage rod and crossgate cable. 

Once I have the rest of the suspension off front and rear, I will get cleaning and painting.

When I removed the wheel, it had a rubber dust shield behind it, unfortunatley there doesn't appear to be one on the other side. I'm fairly sure its not an OEM part. Anyone seen one of these before?

 

front wheel inner cover_resized.jpg

It's getting there......

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  • 3 weeks later...

Front drivers side suspension is now removed, once again it came apart relatively easily with a squirt of GT85. I should have the sterring rack and through chassis pipework out over the bank holiday weekend.

I really need to move house now so I have a decent sized garage to house the project. Its really not good having a car in a million pieces and not be able to start putting it back together.

:) 

It's getting there......

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  • 2 months later...

Fantastic work Tim,

So pleased you are still cracking on with this project, glad to see you got that old rusty suspension stripped, i feel your pain. !  I think plastic zip tie bags is a fantastic idea as a full rebuild you will end up with so many nuts bolts, parts, washers etc and will save you so much time on the rebuild when putting her back together. :)  Keep up the great work and look forward to the suspension bits coming back from the enginners, will see the results and consider this option  myself in the future. !   Very clever idea buying stub axles from the lotus parts sale....... why did i not bits  :wallbash:

Looking forward to future posts :yes:

A

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On 13 August 2016 at 05:17, TAR said:

 

I thought it would be a great idea to sort all the individual parts into resealable bags and mark them with the part number and where whey are in the parts list. This has taken ages to do just the suspension and some other random parts but it's going to help when I need to identify the parts during reassembly.

:) 

I would also suggest you video everything, in addition to pics. These cars take so long to restore its amazing how quickly you forget. And the documentation and general knowledge base is fairly limited.

 

Edited by Rolls
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may be too late for that good idea. I could however, video myself swearing at the parts when I can't remember where they went :) 

 

I've removed the rear suspension on the passenger side today. The long stud through the bottom of the rear hub is stuck fast so I'll need to be careful removing it. The radius arm mounting bush bolt is also stuck fast but that should be more easily removed. The rest of the mounting came apart without much of a fight.

:) 

It's getting there......

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Some more dismantling today. I was suprised by how heavy the rear hub setup is!

The rear wheel nuts are stuck fast so I removed it along with the rear hub. I can soak the wheel nuts more easily like this. Notice how oily this side is... thats due to the dry sump oil gubbins living just above it. Hopefully this will facilitate the removal of the component parts.

100_2664.JPG

 

The pipes through the chassis have also been removed and appear in quite good condition but I think I'll change them for peace of mind (I wouldn't want to have a problem with them once the car is rebuilt).

100_2654.JPG

In the image above, there are 4 alloy pipes and one which looks like steel. I can't recall what the steel one does?

Car has 2 large pipes for radiator flow and return. 2 small pipes for heater. It has air con but the pipes run inside the car not the chassis. Oil pipes also run outside the chassis.

Anyone know what its for?

 

Chassis is nearly bare now. :) 

100_2665.JPG

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It's getting there......

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Tim nice to see some pictures of the nearly bare chassis, I looks really clean.  The good thing about stripping it down like this you can always do lets say strip the o/s/r trailing arm, paint, re bush, etc a little by little and then when all those little projects have been done simply bolt straight back on to your hopefully by then freshly painted chassis !   A bit like a big mechano set  and a relaxed restoration at your own leisure at the same time .:thumbup:  

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A

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more progress over he last couple of days. 

I have managed to remove a couple of the old bushes by burning them out; messy but effective.

100_2679.JPG

The long stud through the passenger side lower link and hub is stuck fast. I've sprayed it daily for a couple of days with WD40. I've now cut the stud to release the lower link and one end of the stud has now worked loose and I was able to drive it out. The other part is stuck fast and will most likely need to be drilled out.

100_2673.JPG

100_2678.JPG

The wheel which was stuck to the hub is now free thanks to a local tyre fitting place with a powerful air impact wrench. I had already used my electric impact wrench and a breaker bar with a 4ft length of scaffolding tube - these wouldn't touch the wheelbolts!

100_2675.JPG

One hub is now ready for cleaning and final dismantling

100_2681.JPG

Driveshafts need looking at but appear to be in good shape. I guess I can get them refurbished for less than the cost new from SJ's.

100_2671.JPG

 

It's getting there. :) 

 

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It's getting there......

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Some good progress on her Tim,   I did the opposite on my silver s3 i took the whole hub assembly with arms still attached to get the wheel bearing changed due to the hassle you have found. !  Not looking forward to doing the outer lower arm bushes when they do finally perish lol. 

Regarding your driveshafts, yes new ones are expensive from the grand scheme of things, well not for new units but a hefty price tag on the restoration budget.

I have a set for the project car, I cant remember of hand if both cv joints are the same i.e at either end. ?  But if you strip yours and find one or two to be shot, give me a shout as you are more than welcome to 2 cv joints of my shafts as i only need to supply 2 to the company that bullds my bespoke shafts. 

But i would think a good clean down of yours, you will probably find they are decent, best think i have found over the years for cleaning and inspecting cv joints is one of those brake cleaner spray cans, cleans well,pushes out the muck and drys quickly, your boots may be ok too, then just clean down the outer layers and paint them and fit nice new clips  Another finished set of parts ready to fit at your leisure. :thumbup:

Tyre places air impact guns are the spawn of satan, they have never heard of wheel bolt torques.!  But at least they helped on this occasion lol.

A

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Buy a press - it's the best bit of kit I have bought. I replaced a lower link bush tonight in a relatively short time.

With regard to bagging up components I can recommend some self seal clear plastic bags, Then write on them what's in there and where it goes with a Sharpie. Then store them away for years until you can't remember what the hell they are and then spill brake fluid in the box of bags so that all the writing comes off :wallbash:

Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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lol @Paul Coleman 

I know your pain. I used white electrical tape originally and wrote on it with permanent marker. Unfortunately it wasn't too permanent and faded away. I've no idea where all the wires in the loom go!

I'll remember to be careful with the bags. I've currently got several boxes strewn across the living roon floor full of bagged parts and only a slight smell of degreaser and old oil.

@Lotusfab - it may be a few years off being finished, I hope you can wait.

:) 

It's getting there......

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Not done much over the last few days except to strip the final few bits off the chassis.

The oil pipes are a tight fit in the chassis holes and required some though to remove. I was sure they had been made up in-situ but I realised that putting a kink in the pipe inside the front box section allowed enough movement to get the end fitting twisted through the holes.

Unfortunately, I didn't get any pictures of this.

I spent hours cleaning the chassis with soapy water, a stiff nylon bristle brush and my jetwash on a low power setting. It made quite a difference but has uncovered light rusting where I believe the galvanising has worn out. I posted a seperate thread asking what my options might be. Since posting I have decided to get the chassis zinc thermal sprayed. I have found evidence to suggest that this will not distort anything and I have a local firm who I am going to ask for advice before committing. 

I've also been in contact with Lotus to ask if they have the measurments for the chassis so I can check its currently true; they are going to get back to me if they can find the data.

I intend to check it before and after the coating to ensure it remains true. If it doesn't I'm sure I can find someone with a jig to fix it.

:)

 

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It's getting there......

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