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Andjons

Head Gasket?

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Hi there pop pickers. Wookie here, back at the mechanical mayhem parlour with an update on all of the good stuff which has been going on in the past few days......

With the gearbox removed, the flywheel is showing signs of distress and would benefit from a skim. A worn clutch plate also needs replacing within a few hundred miles. At this stage, with so much of the rear end dismantled, it makes sense to do both jobs now.

DSCF9313.jpg

Removal of the flywheel reveals the crankshaft rear oil seal cover showing all the indications of a healthy leak which Andy had asked us to rectify.

DSCF9318.jpg

Crankshaft rear oil seal cover removed.

DSCF9319.jpg

Sump unbolted in preparation for removal.

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Oil pump pickup and dipstick tubes revealed.

DSCF9322.jpg

At this point the sump will 'hang' and be impossible to remove due to the presence of one of the main aircon pipes running across the bottom of the sump at the front. The pipe is tie-wrapped to the chassis thus affording less than enough space to jiggle the sump out once all of the bolts have been removed. Well, you can imagine what came off worst in the tie-wrap and pliers wars!

The following picture shows the sump and baffles after removal. Two bolts hold the baffles onto the sump. To the right of the two bolts (rear of the car) you can see the cutout in the baffle plate which allows the oil pickup tube to curve round it and position the filter at the bottom of the sump casing.

DSCF9325.jpg

With the baffle plate removed , we can see the gungy mess which has gradually drained down to the bottom of the engine since the oil was dropped at the start of the maintenance period.

DSCF9328.jpg

Even though this car appears to have a magnetic drain plug, which was free from swarf when the oil was dropped, we felt it prudent to trawl the gunge for signs of metal which might indicate a bearing breaking up, say.

DSCF9332.jpg

Examination of the business end of the magnetic pickup revealed our fears to be unfounded.... at last, a lucky break! The black bits on the cloth are old sealant dislodged during the sump separation, not distressed engine shavings, phew!

DSCF9333.jpg

One final check was necessary to ease our minds that there was no further damage to the engine. Here's a picture of one of the con rod big end bearings that we checked. The resulting clean bill of health was lucky break No.2.

DSCF9337.jpg

DSCF9347.jpg

Here's why, with the baffle plate is bolted to the sump, the sump requires a deal of jiggling to effect its removal. Yes, it's the first public appearance of the oil pickup filter/strainer. A spray around with degreaser failed to see the appearance of any metal residue on the cloth held underneath it.... more good news. You could remove the two bolts holding the baffle plate to the sump and remove both items seperately, but it's no fun wiggling a spanner around in the oily mess trying to get the bolts out.

DSCF9341.jpg

While we are at the bottom of the engine, here's a little bonus picture. It's a view, up through the engine, of the bottom of a piston with the small end, gudgeon pin and con rod plainly visible. Not a lot of people get to see this... aren't we the lucky ones?

DSCF9346.jpg

To be continued in next post.....


In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.<br />

<br />

In practice, there is!

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Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

So, onwards with the update......

With so many mucky bits cluttering the place up, it was time to hit the high tech cleaning facilities

DSCF9334.jpg

DSCF9365.jpg

With the usual pleasing results

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DSCF9366.jpg

With a mind to complete thoroughness we decided to check the front crankshaft oil seal for leaks which meant that the crankshaft timing belt sprocket had to be removed. No big deal as the timing belt had already been removed. It got a clean bill of health.

DSCF9351.jpg

Not so lucky on the health front was the sprocket and flange combination. The flange hole was found to be oval rather than circular, meaning that the sprocket was guaranteed to run out of true due to it not being able to be seated correctly.

Sprocket

DSCF9360.jpg

Sprocket with flange which should sit nicely round the step on the end of the sprocket.

DSCF9361.jpg

We have no idea how this could have been caused but we don't feel that it would have left the factory in this state. Rectification is , however, a simple filing job as the flange serves largely as a spacer and 'wall' to keep the cam belt from moving itself into a position where it can abrade against the various castings/housings at the front of the engine.

To finish off this post here are some random photos of the crankshaft area for all of you detail devotees.

DSCF9342.jpg

DSCF9343.jpg

DSCF9348.jpg

DSCF9359.jpg

At this point we believe that we are as far down Dismantling Alley as we need to go and are waiting for parts for the rebuild. These are expected during the week so we hope to have more to report very soon.....


In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.<br />

<br />

In practice, there is!

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Just wondering, the hand holding the big end shell, did Freddie Kruger pop round then?

Trevor.


I'll get around to it at some point.

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No, it was the long lost brother that he never knew he had. Good job he washed up first or things would have got dirtier!


In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.<br />

<br />

In practice, there is!

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At last, it looks like we finally get the final parts we need today! Unfortunately we then wait for the gearbox rebuid. Engine is now complete, and I'll post some pics up sometime soon. All being well, the car could be running within a week. I'm getting all emotional...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Looks like another cracking effort from the boys at Watford Exotics. They really are WONDERFUL!

Andjons could i recommend you take up their custom LED fitting service? BR Green would look good especially underlighting the shiny sump?

Just my thoughts.

PS any room on the forcourt yet? Boost and brake issues need a little help here.

Edited by SE Owner :-D

2009 World Singstar Champion

No I don't like the Europa, Evora or Exos.

"Like a cockmonkey with 3 cocks."

SLEG_Rog.jpg

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Well, delivery woes again! Short story - the gearbox bits will be with the specialist tomorrow. I doubt we'll have the box back in time for a weekend fit, which is a shame as the engine is finally done!

Rog - you're not available Sat/Sun/Mon any time, are you? We may have a slot...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Sparky,

Whats all this tomorrow lark. Job done but no gearbox until Sunday. Hope to pick it up then and you can start waving a few spanners on Monday/Sunday night.

Trevor.


I'll get around to it at some point.

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Oh, quel excitement an all that :getmecoat:

You are sooo well connected, Don Skedgelone. I am proud to be one of your footsoldiers.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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We expect to meet ourselves coming in the opposite direction soon as we constantly seem to be playing 'catch-up' with these posts... so here goes.

Rear crankshaft oil seal back in place

DSCF9372.jpg

Newly skimmed flywheel re-fitted (it had previously resembled a cereal bowl)

DSCF9377.jpg

Sump with fresh sealant

DSCF9389.jpg

Baffles fitted to sump and sealant applied ready for mounting

DSCF9390.jpg

Turbo heatshield mounting details

DSCF9392.jpg

Loads of stuff to be reconnected

DSCF9394.jpg

It's the wastegate in the open position, impossible to see with the exhaust connecetd.

DSCF9395.jpg

Finally, main engine components refitted and ready to recieve the gearbox

DSCF9400.jpg

Insert several days wait at this point whilst bits are expected..........

Chargecooler pipes replaced allowing removal of several stepper joints.

DSCF9403.jpg

Engine mount heatshield origami/jigsaw as seen from below

DSCF9410.jpg

Engine mount heatshields as seen from the top

DSCF9415.jpg

Gearbox, with new 2nd gear, remounted

DSCF9421.jpg

Refurbed translator gear being refitted

DSCF9425.jpg

to be continued........


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Oh, it's much more complicated than that! Watch this space...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Don't get too excited, Andy! All that glitters is not - er - cheap.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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.......yup, they're hard won with sweat, tears, blood, guts, makeup and special effects!

But before we continue with the rebuild saga it's time to take a little detour round the second major problem which Andy wanted fixing.... namely the lack of any positive forward motion when the gear lever was in the 2nd gear position. At first, in our naive and eternally optimistic way, we thought(hoped) that it may just be a roll pin in the selector forks which was missing. After a bit of debate we decided to send it away to a specialist because if that wasn't the problem, we would be looking at a world of hurt and a pile of bits which we had never seen before. An adult jigsaw with nightmare potential in the making. Our hope of getting it back quickly was dashed when we discovered that nobody was owning up to having one in the UK and there were 12 back orders for 2nd gear in the Renault factory in France. Anyway we managed to source a new one in England but this delayed the turnaround quite considerably.

The following photos are of the worn bits which were returned with the rebuilt gearbox.

This is the second gear 'hub'

DSCF9436.jpg

There is wear on it causing a less than smooth transition. i.e. It's a bit graunchy and needed replacing.

DSCF9440.jpg

This is the 1st to 2nd syncro ring.

DSCF9441.jpg

The reverse side is showing signs of wear and it was prudent to change it while changing the second gear.

DSCF9442.jpg

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This is the second gear.

DSCF9446.jpg

Teeth? What teeth?

DSCF9450.jpg

So, back to the plot.....

New clutch slave cylinder in position

DSCF9429.jpg

At last, time to turn the key....

She started first time, well, jump started first time as the battery was flat.

Sounded pretty good after the first few seconds whilst the 'cobwebs' were blown out of the systems.

No exhaust blows.

No fluids leaking anywhere.

So far so good.....

The fans cut in at the right temperature, always a pleasing sound to hear.

..... but the temperature kept rising.

Shutdown!

After a suitable interval the procedure was repeated. This time there were no cobwebs to get rid of and most of the oily fingerprints had burnt off leaving us to admire the clean effluent from the exhaust pipe... more fan sounds... more temperature... BUGGER!

A head scratching and systems analysis phase ensued with lots of "It can't be **** because #### is working. The %%%% is brand new. etc etc It can only be the water not circulating, possibly due to a massive airlock". This proved not to be the case!

"Hell's teeth! If it's not the thermostat stuck shut then it's got to be the sodding water pump and that's a bitch on steroids to change..."

Removal of the thermostat cover outlet elbow allowed us to check the thermostat was operating correctly (with due thanks to 'them indoors' for use of the second best pan and copious quantities of boiling water).

"Lets give it a quick start without the cover in place. If we, and the surrounding area, get drenched we'll know that the water pump is working". Everything in the street, including us, remained bone dry.

Now, the smart money says it's an engine-out job to get the water pump off. Not if you are a pissed-off Sparky, it's not!

It was a a shame to have to remove the cambelt as that was one of the few bits of the engine that we hadn't needed to disturb so far... but off it came, along with all of these bits (and associated belts)

DSCF9434.jpg

And here's the proof

DSCF9435.jpg

This is what the water pump should look like

DSCF9430.jpg

Not like this... with a detatched impeller

DSCF9433.jpg

A disappointing end to a great day, on which we were hoping to see an Esprit capable of being reunited with it's owner who must be missing it as much as we would like to miss it!

So now we are waiting on a water pump and the saga continues. Watch this space for the next nail-biting instalment!


In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.<br />

<br />

In practice, there is!

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Outstanding - shame also.

You may have guessed i wasn't around Sat/Sun/Mon but if you have a vacancy on the aforementioned forecourt Thurs onwards i would be grateful...


2009 World Singstar Champion

No I don't like the Europa, Evora or Exos.

"Like a cockmonkey with 3 cocks."

SLEG_Rog.jpg

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Make sure you chuck a new clutch hose on there too, braided one... :sofa:


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I thought as it has a chargecooler it was later than my 88, but I'm puzzled by the gear linkage being on the other side of the gearbox?


Life is like a sewer, what you get out of it, depends on what you put into it. (Tom Leahrer)

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Hi Roger - Not sure, but I believe that was standard from 1993? Much more sensible cable routing.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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I thought maybe they had found a pile of Citroen gearboxes in a disused shed or something!


Life is like a sewer, what you get out of it, depends on what you put into it. (Tom Leahrer)

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It's tempting to say "Another day, another pile of dirty bits", but today was an exception to the usual rules

Here's what a newly refurbed water pump looks like

DSCF9452.jpg

Complete with attached impeller

DSCF9453.jpg

Now, being in a rage only helps matters duriing removal so today was a picture of calmness... OK, so I'm stretching things a bit here, there were bucket loads of expletives installed along with the shiny bits but in a very controlled and sometimes alliterative manner.

The biggest problem is that there are two hoses which must be located at the same time as the pump is offered up to its mating face..... let's see if you can tell which ones they are from this picture.

DSCF9462.jpg

The problem ones are the metal protruding pipe which comes from the cylinder head, connecting to the rubber hose already installed on the pump (see previous picture) and the rubber hose visible at the top left of the mating flange which connects to the inlet manifold on the head. The problem is that at this point there is a nice bead of sealant around the mating face of the pump. If you don't hit the connection first time you will almost certainly wipe off the sealant...... meaning that you have to take it off and redo the sealing compound and go round again. Anything less and you can't guarantee an effective seal.

The last picture shows the bottom adjuster on the power steering pump, included here as you don't often get a chance to see it.

DSCF9466.jpg

The rest of the operation is just a bunch of tedious hose connections in incredibly awkward places... which was where most of the expletives were installed!


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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That water pump looks too clean - can i have one that shiny?


2009 World Singstar Champion

No I don't like the Europa, Evora or Exos.

"Like a cockmonkey with 3 cocks."

SLEG_Rog.jpg

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