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Bike engined 7


davegtst

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For a while now i can't get the idea of owning a bike engined Lotus 7 type car. I've been looking into it alot and they sound really interesting and extremly quick. A friend of mine built a 7 type kit car with a vauxhall 2 litre 16 valve lump a few years ago but said they aren't all they are cracked up to be. Who knows, if i get one i may even track it a little. Has anyone owned one or got any experience with them? I'm thinking of something a bit like this.

Edited by davegtst
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had the same thought before buying my tuscan

had a go in a VM 77

it had a hayabusha powerd engine (total weight about 500 kg's)

thing is that they only have 6 gears forward

no reverse gear

you can say : so what

but i've been driving it for 1 day

whent like a spoetnic

but

needed a helmet

it rains overhere sometimes (does it rain on your little island ?) and that's a menace without a top

no reverse

and your sitting really low

your allway's on eyesight of the back fender or exhaust of the car in front of you

put it in a parking and you'll never find it

to basic for me

but it was a hell of a ride

rens

researche is something i do when i don't know what the hell i'm doing

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Unlucky on buying a paper Esprit! :wine:

IMO you should only be considering such an extreme car like this for track use. Practically, it's no good for anything else bar blatting around a circuit having a hoot. If you want it as a Sunday driver, you'll be wasting 99% of what the car was built to be about.

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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It's not that i don't want to drive it in the wet, it's because i don't really have time to. I don't comute to work (i have my AA van parked outside) so apart from picking the missus up from work ocasionally and going out the only time i use it is when i take it out for a blast.

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Hilarous fun - a lot of poeple told me about my Elise that it's not much of an event car but it was.

As a turn key car westies / caterhams are excellent (speed bumps can be a problem) but for scooting around town they are amazing good fun - the Esprit isn't as much as a turn key car which by that I mean negotiating traffic, parking, turning it around and so on - for poping down to the shops, little sunday run arounds and just mental 15minutes they are spot on and the complete opposite and compliment to the esprit imo.

I got offered a westy at

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I refer to my earlier statement, perhaps it's a Jag you're after. Fast '7' replicas are highly compromised fun machines. You'll need a hat/glasses or helmet for any journey more than to the track and back.

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I'm not saying i would like one to do long journeys in just what are like, Jag's are definatly not me. I go to Devon every few months to see my parents (200 miles from me) was just wondering if that's a bit too far for one of these. All i'm really after is fun and scare me stupid acceleration with 4 wheels.

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Dave, can be harsh.

Probs you have is cold, rain, noise, creature comforts (lack of), harsh ride, I find being low down a lot harder to drive as well (same with the elise), tramlining esp with live steering etc.

They're not the kinda car like the Esprit you can point at the motorway sit back and chunder along at xxxmph.

Not a motorway car at all, more of a toy for arsing around in, getting the back out in all sorts of situations and drives under 100 miles.

For the one you had in the link

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If you want the ultimate bike engined vehicle, google T-Rex.

A local here in Plettenberg Bay has a 7 replica with a turbo charged Mazda Rotary. He took me for a drive and it was the first time that I have been scared as a passenger. Even the change from 3rd to 4th left rubber on the road.

Edited by Roger 912
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Dave,

designed build and driven and raced one the past 5 years, speed is the sensation of these cars.

To drive them on the road you schould compare them to a sports motorbike, no creature comforts, little luggage space, tiring to drive but an immense sensation.

For long trips, well can be done, I did ,but right now I would rather take the Elise

Cor

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I owned and used a Seven as my only car and daily commute for five years - sun, rain or snow - so it can be done. But a windscreen and sidescreens make a huge different to the comfort factor especially on motorways. Often the bike engined sevens only have a small aerofoil which helps a little but realistically you'd have to wear a helmet to avoid going deaf and blind from the wind buffeting.

Another thing is that no matter how fast it feels you will inevitably want more power as some point. But unlike car engines, bike engines are pretty much tuned to the max out of the box. So although you may pick up a Fireblade engined car for a bit less, in the long run it's a false economy - try to stretch your budget to a Hayabusa to start with. You can pick up a second hand Westfield Megabusa for close to 10k these days. Best place to look is here:

http://www.pistonheads.com/sales/list.asp?s=107

Then factor in a few hundred quid for a windscreen and sidescreens and you'll have many happy hours motoring. For a summer blast around some B roads nothing can beat the raw nimble experience - not even dare I say it, an Esprit :lol:

May: DON'T hit it with a hammer!

Clarkson: Why?

May: Cause it's the tool of a pikey.

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May have changed on modern caterhams but my 1989 car had a tiny fuel tank - 6 gallons I think?

Driven in a 'spirited' fashion (and its hard not too) those twin webers drank fuel at about 15mpg and so range was limited to say the least!

Mine was an early pre-litigaton narrow bodied Westfiled with a 4.5 gallon fuel tank - you'd have to be taking to really easy to scape 100 miles out of it. But that was part of the fun, blasting past a load of traffic then pulling into a garage further down the road. One of the cars I overtook would pull in behind me and be baffled that it only took 20 quid to fill the tank to the brim!

But you don't want a 16 gallon tank in a 500kg car. That's like carrying around another person all the time.

May: DON'T hit it with a hammer!

Clarkson: Why?

May: Cause it's the tool of a pikey.

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Yeah Dave,

had/built both

first car was a zetec 2.0 powered car with windscreen and hood, driven this for 3 years as my only car.

Other one was a home designed and built bike engined car (kawa zx12). Had this one for 4 years and used it mainly as a fast road and track car. Car engined 7's are more suited for everyday use especially in my case where it also had a screen and hood. The are easier to drive because it's easier to drive slower with them. With a bike engine it is all or nothing as far as i expierienced.

Cor

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IMO the bike engine is suited to the application well.

Most people put ford/GM basic engines in becuase they are cheap and easy to maintain. But they are designed for torque and moiving 1 tonn+ cars about.

The 7 is light as well, more comparable to a bike than a car. All the top mental ball out cars I have seen like this have bike engines in because at that weight the bike engine serves the application better.

Personally I would go for a little honda lump, mebbe try supercharging it as well. A lot of Elises run that now to ~300hp which equates to incredible performance.

I had a race with a gold leaf Elise in my GT3 and he WASTED me, totally destroyed from this roundabout all the way to ummm 120 kmh (not mph becuase that would be illegal)

Not expensive - stupidly reliable and lots of power.

But see you can get that from a light weight engine doing 150-160 bhp. Id research the engine 1st and see what probs it has and what probs it has in a car format.

Failing that its a huge V8 in the front and the car weighs a lot more but sounds glorious - side exit exhausts mmmm

Then you have to re-consider the weight, that thing is probably rolling on for 650kg for the same performance, Colin always told us performance through light weight - he'd stick a bike enigne in I'm sure.

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I would not say a bike engine is well up to the job. A modern sports bike weighs about 200 kgs. Building a car around a bike engine means a car of at least 400 kgs. This explains the strain on the clutch and gearbox using a bike engine. Also you need to work out a way to avoid oil surge because the engine is held upright while cornering. Believe me if I would build another car for road and trackday use I would be using a car engine and gearbox. For the engine I would use a Ford Duratec 2.0.

On the other hand, for circuit use i would build another zx12 powerded car because it is the cheapest way to go very quick on a race track!

hope this adds a bit to the confusion thumbsup.gifthumbsup.gif

Stricor009.jpg

Edited by cor
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Personally I would go for a little honda lump, mebbe try supercharging it as well. A lot of Elises run that now to ~300hp which equates to incredible performance.

Me too! Steve Williams had 300 brake on his honda S1 elise.

:hrhr:

If i had lots of spare cash burning a hole in my pocket, i'd have the Duratec conv done on the Elise. Even the standard conversion takes the standard Elise to 205bhp on a STOCK ford Duratec engine, then you can go further if you want. It's not cheap but it buys you reliability in an unstressed lump but with sh*tloads more power and torque. S1 Elise with this conversion are selling for top money (

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Have you see the honda lump in it ?

It's like 1/2 the size of the Rover one in yours lol

I can remember seeing that engine in a racing exige once and going-----where is the engine ?

I looked at one recenetly and was annoyed how well they hold their price...

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Thanks for all your replys. Has anyone had experience with both car engined 7's and bike engined 7's? How do they compare?

In terms of useability a bike engined 7 has a much more sensitive biting point on the clutch and a much lighter flywheel. So you need to be very precise with the clutch and throttle to pull away smoothly. Otherwise you'll:

a) stall

b) rev the nuts off the engine but not go anywhere

c) disappear in a screaming cloud of tyre smoke

Of course with practise it should become second nature, but it you're struck in traffic or pottering around town a car engine is easier and more forgiving.

May: DON'T hit it with a hammer!

Clarkson: Why?

May: Cause it's the tool of a pikey.

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Longest journey undertaken with my "Lotus" Birkin Super 7 fitted with a Kent lump tuned to 135 bhp was a 5 hour journey from Plettenberg Bay to Cape Town, and that was in the middle of the South African Winter.

Longest journey undertaken in England with my first Super 7 with the same Kent mill was from Taunton to Oulton Park. That was for a Lotus 7 meeting in 1986. One of the fellows I met there was from Luxembourg and he had driven the entire way without the top up, in the typical English Summer weather of pouring rain.

In fairness, I had a WWII flying helmet and goggles. Didn't have the flying jacket, but it would have made the trip more comfortable.

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