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S3 fuse box upgrade


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I had planned to replace my 2 glass fuse boxes that sit in the glove box with 1 neat blade fuse holder. I even bought one intending this.

However, now all my wiring is exposed in its nakedness, its obvious that its not as simple as that. Under each fuse terminal is a 4 way multiconnector, so there are several circuits directly connected across each fuse.

I cant see similar fuse boxes available. Wonder if such a thing as 4 into 1 connectors exist?

Any clever solutions?

"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them." Albert Einstein

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good grief !

thanks for telling me as i was getting ready to embark on this project myself.I cant stand the glass type fuses as they rattle and can work erratically.

think i will let a lekie do it rather.

sorry i can't help but thanks for the info.

richard

Technically sound ...Theoretically poked !

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Simon

Take a trip to the breakers and remove a fuse box from a latter car like a fiesta im sure they will have this. Also you can by terminals that are 4 way so can piggy back off them. Check out Wurth.co.uk

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks for all the suggestions but I couldn't find anything similar.

I may therefore split up all the combined circuits so that each has its own fuse. Will make fault finding easier in the future also.

I'll let you know how I get on.

"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them." Albert Einstein

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've just done this using fuse boxes from car builder solutions (google them).

PB144358.jpg

I've kept the interconnections from the previous box; you just need to be careful and look at what's going on, then replicate it. Some of the circuits that used to go through a 17 amp fuse in combination have been split out to go through separate fuses. where this has happened I'll make the combined fuses add to 15 amps and see what happens from there (use a 10a and a 5a).

PB134347.jpg

PB134348.jpg

PB144357.jpg

it took quite a while, I've soldered all the fittings and made a new glovebox; when I put it all back together I'll support the wiring a lot better.

I did the windows relay job at the same time

PB134352.jpg

and coming soon, a story about removing the heater...

PB154359.jpg

ready to replace it with a combined aircon/heater unit...

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Simon

Deffinately a worthwhile upgrade which i will be doing soon. One thing i would advise though is to spend some extra pennies as there not much and buy some decent terminals and get rid of the nasty halfords boy racer stereo fix terminals. You can get non insulated ones with rubber boots which are only cheap and they provide much better contact and wear through the years. Visit Wurths website for some good quality ones. Would also advise to heatshrink the wire once the terminal is fitted, not only does it prevent terminals hitting, shorts etc but also it holds the wire in place better when pulled about. You could also look at solderless heat shrink terminal? All you need is a lighter. They are a better option for a permanent repair.

Will also be easier now you have them all connected how you ant, just pull the terminal off and slide the new ones on. Rpob a hours job.

Well done though, not many people like car wiring. I must be odd as i do...

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If you are handy with welder then the only big cost items are the power steering column, a steering wheel boss and an optional controller if you have a mechanical speedo.

Hilly

1981 S3 4.2 V8 6 speed (The Mutant)

Mutant V8 Conversion Thread

Knowledge is power .................... apparently.

 

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Simon - great job, exactly what I have intended, just didn't realise the Lotus factor.

I need to get my head around this one.

Lets take a typical fuse. several wires on each side. Fine, but which should I separate to different fuses? It doesn't seem intuitive so presumably, splitting up would be based on wiring diagrams (which I have)

However, in splitting grouped wires on one side of the fuse, presumably there would be a risk of disconnecting circuits that are meant to share a common origin etc...?

I definately dont want to strip out the dash again!

Lots of head scratching on the way.

Hilly, good point re power steering. Can't even contemplate that though until I think I can achieve a running car again - still not sure despite about to fork out

"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them." Albert Einstein

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Power steering is in (although not in that photo!), brackets all made and high current wire run; I've also got hold of suitable indicator/wiper stalks and adapted wiring; at the moment I'm struggling with incorporating intermittent wipers (I bought a kit to do it but integrating it is proving a headache... I'll get there!).

As I'm vertically challenged (6'6") I've gone for the tilt adjustable column so hopefully that'll make a big difference, along with the mk1 elise seats.

The window relay mod is written up well elsewhere in the forum; I did a search and found quite a lot of good info, including a diagram from Lotus for dealers about how to do it. Basically what I did is run a nice thick wire to the doors; this carries the current that is going to operate the window motors. Then the original wiring from the switch goes to a couple of relays that switch the current to the motor. You need to provide for three states; no current to the motor (window not moving), +/- for up, and -/+for down.

When I did the fuses I just looked really carefully at what was going on; if the supply side crossed a number of fuses I've made sure there is a grouped connection on the supply side before it goes across the fuse. Looking at the wiring diagram helps group destinations well, but this could be done by just looking at the wiring colours too. I've checked it all since I did it and it all works ok, but I'm prepared to have to tinker a bit maybe later, and have left some capacity for future fittings.

Not really sure what you mean Wayneb911; all the spade females are soldered rather than crimped and heatshrunk where needed...

Cheers,

Simon

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Hi simon

What i ment was about the coloured terminals that have been used. I have always found they are okay for quick fixes but always remind you of kit car builds or boy racer stereo instalations. Heat shrink and solder terminals always finish better and look more OE.

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I'm not too worried about the appearance, as a boy racer I like it! Joking aside as long as it's robust (which soldering the connections gives) and safe (heatshrunk rather than dodgy twists of insulating tape) I'm happy!

Cheers,

Simon

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Sorry to be a dunce, but when soldering the terminals, do you 'tin' the spades and wires first? Also, is twisting the wires a good idea - don't the oils from your fingertips weaken the bond?

Also, when combining several wires to one terminal, whats the best way to do it?

"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them." Albert Einstein

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I've got a good hot iron, don't tend to tin either first or twist the wires (although the flux in the solder should deal with any skin oils I'd think). the spade connectors 'take' the solder well, combining wires into common juctions I've done most often at the connector (you can get them designed to accept quite thick gauge wire, so looping through to another fuse is quite easy). I think that there are probably better or easier ways to do this, but as I had time and solder to splash around this is the way I went. I'd already bought the replacement fuse box when I saw the problem of many connectors on each side of a single fuse, and if I was doing it again I'd go to a breakers and see what I could find; there may well be alternatives out there that are more 'plug and play'...

cheers,

simon

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Sorry to be a dunce, but when soldering the terminals, do you 'tin' the spades and wires first? Also, is twisting the wires a good idea - don't the oils from your fingertips weaken the bond?

Also, when combining several wires to one terminal, whats the best way to do it?

Tinning is always advisable. The spades can often be too 'slippery' so a quick file in the tube with a dremmel makes a certain bond with the solder and wire. With the spades tinned it also makes the time in contact with the wire shorter so they are less likely to melt their sleeves. some heat shrink over the whole spade when done will make a perfect sheild against shorting too.

It is always best to double the wires at the spades by twisting the pair together then tinning, then soldering to the spade

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