free hit
counters
Evora Brakes Squeal - Ride/Handling/Suspension/Brakes/Wheels/Tyres - The Lotus Forums Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Has anyone experienced brake squeal on the Evora? The car is 1 week old and the brakes are squealing like a pig. The car has not been driven hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

All the time since new 6 months ago. Drives me nuts. Fine on moderate or hard braking or when very hot after a blast but all the rest of the time at normal levels of braking when not trying to evict passengers they squeal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I will have to talk to the dealer about this. Maybe I can request for a new set and see if that helps. I'll keep you posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

mine squeal too... but only when hot and dry outside. I tried with WD40 spray... helps only for a day. A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I hope that's a joke? Don't go anywhere near brakes with oil!

Mine don't squeel, but I think they have been very well bedded in with a couple of trackdays. A common cure is either pad backings or copper grease on the rear of the pads. But in the case of the OP I would first recommend you get the pads and disks bedded in properly. Have a look on the AP website for an example of a procedure - in a nutshell, a good few high speed stops are needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

WD40 is not an oil - Water Dispersant Formula number 40.

It isn't even a lubricant and will evaporate very quickly when used on brakes. It's actually very useful if you are putting a car in storage to spray the discs with WD40 to prevent corrosion. It's only on the first application the brakes are a bit light but then they are back to normal.

Decent brakes do squeal if used for the road - it's just one of those compromises.

However as above - performance brakes can be helped by periodically bedding in or using on track. In essence do a few 60-10 medium stops (no abs and no coming to a halt) to get the brakes up to temp. Then do three-five hard 70+ - 10 mph stops on the limit without engaging ABS and don't come to a stop.

Then drive about for a about 10 minutes to cool them off. If you can help it don't stop and if you must don't sit on the foot brake but use the hand brake to hold the car if needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nick Adams says:

With new pads and discs, or just new pads fitted run the car around for 10/20 miles using the brakes gently as normal to bed the two surfaces together. Once this has been done, check the surfaces of the discs and make sure there are no signs of any scoring or damage. Assuming all looks well take the car to an appropriate piece of quiet and straight, well sighted road and perform half a dozen medium pressure stops from 50 mph down to 20 mph to warm the brakes up. Avoid more than a minute between each stop so that the temperatures do not get a chance to deteriorate too much. Once the brakes are warm and the coast is clear, perform 2 or 3 hard stops from 70mph (where local laws allow!) to 20 mph, braking as hard as you can without locking up. Do not come to a halt between each stop, do them as fast as you can to get the brakes really hot. On the third stop come to a halt and, keeping your foot on the brake, press the brake pedal down as hard as you can and hold it there for at least a couple of minutes, don't apply the handbrake. This hurts if you are doing it right! This will bed the pistons, shims and pads together and will compress the pad material, giving a hard and repeatable pedal. Once the 2 minutes have passed, release the pedal and go for a short drive, using the brakes as normal to let everything return to normal temperatures. The brakes are now fully bedded in and ready for use in anger. Recompressing the pads once every few thousand miles to the above procedure will help keep the pedal firm, especially if you don't normally use the brakes hard.

Cheers, Nick

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I really respeect Nick however I can't agree with his advice there.

Everything is fine right up until the bit where he says to stamp on the brake pedal as hard as you can.

Every brake manufacturer in the world will tell you all that will do is transfer hot pad material to the disc giving the symptoms of a warped disc.

I mean, would you go out on track and when finishing a session enter the pits and sit hard on the brakes? or even leave the car with hand brake on?

I'd need alot of convincing before following the last step.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had bad squeal from my pads, but the dealer fixed it with some copper grease.. I think that's what he called it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Copperslip grease is a frequently used grease for specialist hot applications. We use it a lot on ships in high temperature locations.

Will be interesting to know which bit the dealer had to grease to prevent the noise. Almost nothing is greased on a brake set up as the brake dust just clings to it and then it gets caked hard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Copper grease on the back of brake pads is as old as the hills, it's a very, very common solution to the problem and all pads should get a thin coating of copper grease (or copper slip as some people call it.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acknowledging all the expertise documented above, the handbook has some words along similar lines regarding bedding in the brakes. At least mine does. And I did, and have had no problem.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Acknowledging all the expertise documented above, the handbook has some words along similar lines regarding bedding in the brakes. At least mine does. And I did, and have had no problem.

Ditto!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Problem I have is not brake squeal, but the brakes binding on when I have just washed the car, and put it away in the garage.

If I move the car the next day, there is usually a load crack as the brakes release, but if I leave it more than a couple of days, the front wheels lock for about 6 feet before the release.

I dont put the handbrake on when the car is in the garage, and usually try a dab of brakes as I drive it in.

Any suggestions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Drive the car for 5 mins after washing it to dry the brakes, it's not uncommon for this to happen on any car as the brakes disc surface will start to rust up in 5 minutes in the right conditions (hot, damp etc).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Due to working away for 4 weeks at a time I have had many years ago similar problems and even warped disks etc. Now when I wash my cars before leaving I take them for a short drive round the local housing estate with left foot on the brake to heat them up. Like you I only ever leave in gear in the garage and have had no problems.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My brake squeal is driving me nuts again :(

It was fine for a while after the dealer applied the copper slip, but they're just as bad again now. They seem fine when pulling away from cold, and it seems ot take a few miles normal driving before they start squealing, then it's every time I'm slowing down with gentle pressure.

I've tried all the above, and nothing is helping... t can't be doing my tyres any good to be trying so many big stops.

It's so loud I can't drive with the window open, it's deafening!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Change the pads? There are some here for under £30 and it will only take an hour or so, simple job.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Might have to resort to that...

Bell and Colvill have got some replacement shims coming for me, so I'm hoping they will cover the cost of new pads if needed.

I'm certain I've done everything right with regards bedding them in and looking after them, so I can only assume there is some sort of fault.

I might just be paranoid, but the brakes have felt different lately.. there seems to be a bigger dead area before the brakes take effect, then they are really sharp.

Edited by Myfavedave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally, for the sake of £30 I'd get them done myself, I'm guessing that would be much quicker than dropping the car at B&C.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm ashamed to say I'm not experienced at the old DIY... much as I would like to be.

Unfortunately this turns a £30 job into a £150 job!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×