free hit
counters
Grease - Misc including parts cross references - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Recommended Posts

I have a few different types of grease, but I am not sure what their particulars application are. Can anyone shed any light?

(i) copper grease. I know this is good for brake pad squeal, but what else? What shouldn't it be used for?

(ii) Castrol moly grease. This is nice and thick and black, but what is it for?

(iii) when I have had work done on the car, I find that a sort of metallic silver grease has been dabbed on the wheel bolts, and some other parts. What is this, and what else is it good for?

What grease should I use for things like the sliding pins on the rear brake callipers (on an S4)?

Edited by Andjons

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

First off, The silvery "grease" on the wheel bolts is almost certainly something called "Anti-seize". It it generally a teflon type lubricant to prevent galling of metals. Moly grease as far as I know is recommended for the clutch pivot points in the Lotus, but uncertain as to what other specific applications on the Lotus it is recommended for. As for the copper grease on brakes, I've personally never used it for that application (perhaps Lotus recommends it for such, but I've not yet had to change pads, so no experience there). I generally use disk brake quite which is typically a blue or orange latex like substance. I'm sure others will come in to comment shortly on specific usages for Moly and Copper grease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The silver stuff you find is graphite grease, I think I'm correct in that it dosnt pick up dirt? I think I read that.

Copper grease is used to stop brake squel and also to help bolts stop seizing. Becareful what bolts you use it on!

Moly grease has good load bearing i.e dosn't breakdown and is a multipurpose grease.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Three are lots more but here are the main ones I'd consider beyond standard Lithium grease.

Copper grease is designed to stop metallic parts ceasing together, the copper provides a barrier to the metals rusting together. that's why it's good fro brake pads, the grease acts initially as a lubricant and copper particles act as a lubricant also, but they do not dry out (move away), nor do they break down easily. Also good for the pins, just do not use too much so that it will drip onto the pad material.

Moly aka graphite grease. Similar to copper in how it works, grease with small particles of graphite in it. Graphite will be crushed further, but never below the very strong atomic structure of the molecules (a flat plate, I think octagonal). Not as good for brakes as copper, the copper particles are bigger and roll more like beads. Often used in universal joints and other places where higher temperatures can be experienced (not molten metal hot, but the sort where you get metallic surfaces working together but do not have cooling provision). It is very slippery due to the combination of the flat particles which can slide over each other and the grease they sit in.

White grease. Useful for areas that do not move often very thick, sometimes supplied in aerosols so that it can be sprayed onto an area. It sometimes acts as a water-proofing method. Suitable for uses where normal grease would run away over time (door hinges, locks etc) but you do not want frequent application to be necessary. Not as good for preventing face to face rusting together but as it can prevent water ingress it can be used on wheel studs, but I prefer copper.

Water pump grease. Very thick grease, sets akin to candle wax. use in applications where there is very little cooling. Bit old-school. Pre-dates copper and moly, so not used in modern cars (or not generally used in modern cars). really good for helping to get parts in awkward paces, use it like prit-stick on the screwdriver and it will hold the screw in place until it's done up.

Got to mention it here, despite the fact we do not actively use it on Lotus cars (AFAIK).

Chain lube- see motorcycles. It's a grease that comes in aerosol form, sprays really easily, has a solvent in it to help this, solvent and lighter oils evaporate and it forms a sticky goo on thing. Great for protecting engine bores (not needed on Nikasil0) and crank journals etc, just wash it off before re-assembly.

And prompted by Chris above.

DO NOT USE GREASE ON NYLON LOCK NUTS. The ylon is supposed to grip the shaft of the bolt really tightly and mould to the minor imperfections, grease negates the point and so it becomes a normal nut in effect.

Edited by andydclements

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dielectrical grease

A nonconductive grease used mainlyduring installation of spark plug wire boots. However dielectrical grease also can be used on every electrical connection and lightbulb socket. This to help prevent corrosion due to moisture, salt, and excessive heats.

One other thing about nylon lock nuts. They are only designed to be used once. If you cannot replace the nut, use at the minimum a blue coloured threadlocker.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  


×