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Any on here? I've visited Kent Gliding Club a couple of times, picked up a copy of The Glider Pilot's Manual and think I'll get back into it :)


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

I flew one for about 60 seconds some 4 years ago.

Does that count :question:

You've either got too much time or too much money, or both :thumbsup:

Go for it


Wing Commander Dibble DFC<br /><br />
North Midlands Esprit Group<br /><br />
NMEG "the formidable squadron"<br /><br />
"probably the most active Esprit group in the world" Andy Betts, Castle Combe May 2007

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How much fun does this look? :D

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IlXDTFhCG9w


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Very pretty. But the title.."Pushing the Limit"..is close to the truth. Takes a lot of experience and practise to do that...and looping from low level is never that good an idea. Must admit I prefer a few hundred...or, preferably,a few thousand!...horsepower to oppose the drag rather than relying solely on Sir Isaac. I did once watch a glider cross country race pass overhead...crikey!! A large number of gliders in a small patch of sky...I kept expecting shards of glassfibre and parachutes to come falling out of the sky...they're difficult things to see, too, when Joe Blow is tooling around in his spam can..see and avoid, as they say!!

Then again, it's pure flight.....have fun!! Don't get low and slow.....


Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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I used to fly Gliders at Pocklington ( nr York ) back in the 80's before I came to Australia. About 5 years ago I joined the local gliding club here and started all over again as a beginner. I had to give it up after a few months because every time I circled in a rising thermal I felt sick, yet another sign that as I get older things are changing. I can't get on a Roller-coaster anymore either, and I used to love them.

It's a good hobby Bibs, the only down side is that you need to spend a whole day at the club for an hour of flying, if the weathers not real good you might only get a few minutes flying a circuit. It's good value for money though, certainly the cheapest way to get some wings. You also get to drive a tractor, operate a winch and make tea !


Too many Toys are never enough !

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Yup, I'm definitely feeling the age thing lately. Years ago I determined circling round and round in a glider while staring at the ground while looking for thermals wasn't for me, but lately I did some full braking tests on my daily transportation after a pad change and felt a bit woozy after a few tries. The old cranium is turning more gelatin like. unsure.gif

Edited by comem47

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I've tried it a couple of times, but as a PPL I prefer an engine too!

Although in Flight Sim X there's an Alpine Soaring Mission which is quite addictive!


Proud recipient of the LEF 'Car of the Month Award' February 2008

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "Wow, what a ride!!"

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This is the sort of thing that happens when the donk quits.....

http://www.bremont.com/mayday.php


Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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Rubbish flying (although he walked away). With all that green around and such big fields he should have made it down without taking the undercarriage off on a drystone wall. Mind you - easier to be a critic, I've never suffered an engine failure (gear that didn't come down was my most dodgy moment).

He was heading to Kirkbride - had a few trips up there. You land at a disused RAF airfield and taxi into the hotel carpark for a roast dinner...most civilised! Not been for years though, elf 'n safety might have stopped that by now!


Proud recipient of the LEF 'Car of the Month Award' February 2008

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "Wow, what a ride!!"

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My feelings exactly, Stu...and as for trying to fly 23 miles with no oil pressure...and no attempt to convert speed to height, either!! The Yak has a retractable undercarriage, so either he wiped it out on the dry stone wall or simply forgot to put it down in the first place...I couldn't be sure. But it's only when disaster strikes and you have to REALLY deal with it, that you get to know how good you are. I've ended up in a field in a Tiger Moth with a dead donk, and had bits fall off my Airtourer sufficient to make me transmit a mayday....always a good day, AFTERWARDS!!! Once the oil pressure had gone, he should have set himself up for a forced landing before it got properly critical. I always like flying over East Anglia...always somewhere to land!!

Edited by molemot

Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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Isn't that why it is said that learning to fly a glider makes you a better pilot as you are always on the lookout for a friendly field so an engine failure is not such a big deal?

Helicopter flying, now there's a risky occupation. Apparently Mike Costin never liked going up in one as he knew how much depended on how little.


S4 Elan, Elan +2S, Federal-spec, World Championship Edition S2 Esprit #42, S1 Elise, Excel SE

 

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Yes, I think gliding skills would be very useful to any power pilot, although a significant part of PPL training (and recertification) is practising forced landings and what to do when it all goes quiet.

Never ended up in a field without wheels in Lottie when HER oil pressure headed towards the red (usually after a sound thrashing).

Don't want to be too hard on this guy, 'there but the grace...' etc. But his airmanship seemed a little lacking - maybe because he was under stress at the situation. Obvious mistakes that I spotted - pressing on with a clearly significant engine problem, as John says not getting as high as possible (extends glide range) when he still had SOME power, leaving the Carlisle Approach controller in the dark towards the end (guess he'd retuned to Kirkbride), don't know if he'd killed the electrics and fuel and cinched his belts/released the canopy locks before landing. I'm assuming the gear was down as the initial contact (presumably with the wall) was more than a glancing blow.

Just thinking back - once I was doing my twin engine rating (which I never completed) because of an undercarriage fault. Eventually landed when the third green finally lit (after all the book procedures had been tried unsuccessfully) and assumed it was a simple microswitch fault, although the engineers later discovered it was much more serious and we were lucky to get away with it. And I've just remembered hiring a Slingsby T67 at Manchester once (it was on demo) and flying a pal to Blackpool for a coffee and some VERY gentle aeros (my face turns green at 2G). Climbing out near Bolton I heard/felt a couple of huge bangs before the engine started to feel lumpy. Did all the checks - carb heat, temps and pressures etc., but elected a precautionary landing ASAP. We were working Warton Radar who very quickly diverted us to the nearst field...BAE at Samlesbury. Huge runway and a trail of emergency vehicles following us down it. The flying school came out to investigate and couldn't find anything - may have ben a birdstrike or a simple backfire, but they were happy at my decision (and let me take their Piper Cherokee back to Manchester).

Wish I could still afford to fly AND drive nice cars - but my bi-annual ticket expired in August and I've had road tax and repairs to fund!!

Edited by islandbloke

Proud recipient of the LEF 'Car of the Month Award' February 2008

"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely in a pretty and well preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: "Wow, what a ride!!"

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My scariest flying moment was taking off in a luxuriously-refitted Piper Archer, trying to impress my brother as I'd just got my license. It had a little more power than the Warriors I usually flew- and enough, in this case, that when I gave it full throttle for the takeoff roll, my seat popped loose and slip back to the very back of the track, leaving me unable to reach the controls.

The worse part was that with my seat (and over 200 pounds of me in it) all the way back, the aeroplane's CG was shifted back too. The nose rose, and then we were airborne. At around 4 or 5 feet of altitude I finally lunged hard enough to grab the throttle and cut it, and the plane settled down gently and I slid forward and aborted the takeoff.

All the while my brother sat still and quiet like a Buddha in the other seat. I wonder how hard it was for him to maintain that veneer of calm?

So on the taxiway I re-adjusted the seat, made sure that the adjustment lever was clicked into the notch, and even slammed my back against the seat a few times to make sure. Go around and try to take off again.

Same thing happened!

At that point I turned the plane back in and went home.


"If you can't fix it with a hammer, it's electrical." -somebody's dad

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Lapsed for many years. Went solo at RAF Dishforth in 1992 IIRC, mostly winching with a few aerotows for the occasional treat. Ran the student club for Leeds Uni for a year. We had a K2 and I managed to secure funding and buy a K7 that Clevelands GC were looking to shift. Posh at the time! Flew in the T21 a few times, plus a Blanik, K13, and I have a feeling there was an Acro there too. Liked the K13 and K21 best. We weren't even allowed to push the Discus round the airfield, though.

I think the club atmosphere can make or break the experience. Sadly, this means committee people have a great bearing on your enjoyment. Some clubs are hampered by minimal resources; Dartmoor GC was my local for a while after Uni but after a few visits I concluded it was haphazard, too many Big Chiefs, and the airfield was poor - a bog in a cloud most of the time! That was when I lapsed...

Had a week long holiday at the Long Mynd in 2003, my second one at the site. I really enjoyed it but couldn't justify the every-other-weekend commitment it would have required to get solo again and build up reasonable experience. Just not enough time to do everything! The Long Mynd was a very good civilian club in my estimation.


Dan

"He who dies with the most toys wins..."

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A little OT, but the dizzy problems... I was having an issue with feeling woozy after physical effort. Used to be I could ride my bicycle all day and just get tired. In the last year, I started getting dizzy after a few miles, long before I got sore. Same for sawing up fallen trees on my farm for firewood, was getting dizzy, not a good thing when you're holding a large running chain saw.

Finally found the problem - caffeine overload. Granted, I was hitting it pretty hard in my day job, but when I gave up caffeine, the dizzyness went away. After a bit of experimentation, I found I could have one cup of coffee in the morning, and no soft drinks during the day, with no ill effects. But, the days of the large coffee with a shot of cappucino, and steady soft drinks all day are over. Sleeping a lot better than I used to, as well.

This aging isn't all it's cracked up to be, but it's better than the alternative.

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Went solo in gliders in the late 60s at Portmoak, just north of Edinburgh, then PPL (funilly enough at Carlisle) in the early 70s then back to Gliders at Booker in the late 70s and was starting to get the hang of thermals at which point a severe attack of wife, house, stepson, and mother-in-law seemed to cause all of the spare cash to mysteriously evapourate and resulted in the cessation of all flying apart from the 'self loading cargo' variety.

Did a crosswind landing on an active runway in the glider once when the instructor let me run out of height during a handling exercise trip. He asked me if I wanted to do some more turns on the stall before returning and I foolishly said yes and did them before I checked our height. BIG oops! When asked why he let me put us into the precarious sitution he said. "Well, you probably learned more on that flight than in your last half dozen and you now know what it feels like to 'land out'". It may as well have been a 'land out' as everything was unfamiliar approaching the field from the wrong direction and hopping over the boundary fence at the last moment (speed for height). More exciting than I really wanted to have to cope with, but a very valuable lesson.

Favourite thing of all in a glider... flying the envelope behind a tow plane. If you didn't warn the tug pilot that you were going to do it he would just dump you!

Worst experience in a Cessna... the CFI slamming the throttle in on my GFT(General Flying Test) at a height of about 50 feet instants before he called 'Engine Failure'. Apparently he used to love doing that! I, however, didn't think it was that funny.

Go for it Bibs... It's great fun.

Edited by wookie

In theory there is no difference between theory and practice.<br />

<br />

In practice, there is!

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Just some more inspiration...


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I'd love to know the altitude of the last inverted flyby!

Man's got some big ones!

_______________________

The way I used to fly. (This isn't me) And when I flew here, there were no paragliders, just hang gliders. Busiest day would have had about 140 gliders in the air at the main hill and across the bay looking south. Keeps you on your toes.


All we know is that when they stop making this, we will be properly, properly sad.Jeremy Clarkson on the Esprit.

Opinions are like armpits. Everyone has them, some just stink more than others.

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How much fun does this look :D


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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This is one of the instructors from KGC out in the States pulling some moves!


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I had a day hang gliding when I was on holiday in Aus. I loved it but they wouldnt let me go very high and had ropes on the end so they were kinda flying me like a kite. Fab then the wind lifts you fast up into the blue though.

Buddsy


 

"Belief is the enemy of knowing" - Crrow777

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Bloody hell, some of these gliders are incredibly efficient at converting forward speed into altitude. :shock:


All we know is that when they stop making this, we will be properly, properly sad.Jeremy Clarkson on the Esprit.

Opinions are like armpits. Everyone has them, some just stink more than others.

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There used to be a vogue for pilot related bumper stickers....two I recall were:

Fighter pilots are always at instant readiness

and

Glider pilots need a tug first (!)


Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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I did quite a bit of glider flying in my youth as my Scout Troop was linked with the guys at RAF Finningly (sadly it is no more) but I managed to tick another box on my bucket list at the LEGS Breakfast meet last week when we hooked up with the Perth Flying Club -

IMG_4438.jpg

The rate of climb was tremendous and we were at 2000ft in what seemed like a matter of seconds. Best bit was the 100mph blast down the runway at about 10ft. A real buzz and I'll be back for more.

IMG_4440.jpg

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:thumbsup:  :huh:  :stuart:

 

1393494_743903415636539_1548797392_n.jpg


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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