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vintaylor

How do you test electrical components?

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Hi Guys,

Was wondering if anyone had any advice on testing the window lift motors. My car was partly stripped when I bought it, so I'm hoping to test all the motors before re-fitting them to the car.

Cheers :thumbsup:

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My concern was more on the lines of possibly short circuiting the component. Do you think I could use a 12v battery charger with crocodile clips rather than a 12v battery?

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Yes, easiest way is to apply 12 volts to them and see what happens. Check the wiring diagram so that you can tell what wire does what...there will be one to drive them UP and another for DOWN, plus the earth return. There are limit switches in the motors to turn them off once they have reached full movement in either direction. I'd be inclined to plug them into the car wiring harness and test them like that...asssuming you can use the harness and it isn't composed of loads of bare ends of wire. If it is, then simply connecting the right motor wires to a car battery, just hold them to the terminals, ought to give an indication that all is well. Or not, of course.....(!)

A battery charger would probably be OK...off hand, I don't know what current drain the window motors have... as long as the charger can provide this you'd be fine.

Edited by molemot

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Cheers for the info John,

At the moment the car is in about 10,000 separate bits, the harness has been removed and placed in a box at the moment.

Might seem like a stupid question, but what do you mean by current drain and how would I be able to check if using my battery charger would be ok?

Also, how would I know which wire to connect to which terminal, would I need to connect the earth return to anything?

Sorry for the stupid questions, I'm a complete novice at this and don't want to burn any components if possible :P

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You'd be surprised what little happens when you connect up a 12v battery. I remember the first time I did it and prepared for the worst but it just worked!

So in this case, you'd need to connect the earth to the negative terminal, and then try connecting one of the other two wires to the positive. You'll either get up or down depending on which one.

I'm not 100% sure you could use the battery charger to test it though, sure someone will be able to confirm that but I'm fairly sure they don't supply a straight 12v supply.

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Battery chargers supply more than 12 volts...since a fully charged 12v accumulator is typically 13.6 volts, they usually crank out 14v plus. The waveform coming out is often pretty horrible, not a nice flat DC voltage but all sorts of AC ripple, which doesn't worry a battery but might be problematic for electronic kit....not for a motor, though. I would expect a battery charger to suffice for the sort of testing intended here...it's only if the motors need more current than the charger can supply that it might not work. I've just had a look at the Service Notes ( for an S3) and I think you'd be fine with a charger as a voltage source. Can't hurt to try! Just "flash" the wires on to the voltage source in case there is a full short circuit...you'll get a spark on contact but then it ought to work. If it sits there and does nothing and things start to get hot...disconnect it!

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