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Airbus vs Boeing? Which is best? :D

Well the Boeing is supposed to be the "Pilots" choice.. I've flown Dash 8 Q400's and A320 & 321's so couldn't really comment.

The Airbus are very clever and I love using the stick rather than a yolk.. So for that reason I'd say airbus!!

Airbus also have the ability to correct errors in pilots, probably a good thing when I'm at the controls ;-))post-15194-0-70993300-1385415552.jpg

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Latest magnificent machine, not flown it yet, will wait for ideal conditions for the first one.  

Just back from a two day trip. Gatwick-Catania-Gatwick-Madrid-Gatwick-Milan Malpensa-Gatwick. Saw the international Space station last night... You can even see the curvature of Earth from 38

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Back in the day the saying was "If it ain't Boeing, I ain't going!"

Airbus has, nonetheless, produced some very cool aircraft. But the B777 I retired on was a true "Pilot's Airplane." Like auRouge says, it's not work in the usual sense. Though it can be a "task saturation" environment at times, it is always "fun."

Except when an engine craps out at V1, right auRouge?

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Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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Reading this while I'm LAX waiting for my 744 to take me to London (hopefully Sparky's lads get me to LHR and not NHT!)

Paddle Faster, I hear Banjos!
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No worries, that's why God made tubes. :)

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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Back in the day the saying was "If it ain't Boeing, I ain't going!"Airbus has, nonetheless, produced some very cool aircraft. But the B777 I retired on was a true "Pilot's Airplane." Like auRouge says, it's not work in the usual sense. Though it can be a "task saturation" environment at times, it is always "fun."Except when an engine craps out at V1, right auRouge?

Couldn't agree any more, moments of deep concentration for take off where your constantly refreshing your mind to reject or go... V1 pop!!! Stay calm, kick it straight.. Raise the nose to 10 degrees.. Trim... Kick it straight again.. Trim.. Let go, engage the Autopilot and order a cup of tea whilst sitting back considering your options!! This is then followed by what my teacher always said I was best at... Looking out the window for hours and hours still not believing what we do is a job! Hee hee hee, Was worth all the hassle and stress in the early days when getting any sort of flying job after 9/11 was like trying to raise the Titanic.

The B777 was the one we all wanted to end up on when we were in Flight School, hopefully will happen one day :-) My airline is close to announcing its future replacement fleet and has Boeing and Airbus submitting bids.. Who knows!

Here's one for you Iconic Ride, notice also the choice of pilot cars... I'm the only one with a Lotus.

post-15194-0-04483500-1385456822.jpg

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Plenty of time to relax and stare out of the window  :huh:

 

(PS Lots more epic pics from this company in today's Telegraph - http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/10475796/10th-anniversary-of-Airteam-worlds-biggest-aviation-image-library.html?frame=2746426)

 

Airteam__airbus_he_2746450k.jpg

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88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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This guy takes some awesome pics :)

 

http://www.knxposures.com/#!flightdeck/c199t

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Nice pics. GoPro's can capture some amazing spectacles without distracting us. I've got a few to share. Will dust off that thing under the stairs called a laptop with "windows" so I can access Flash and post a few. Got some great shots over the Alps flying into some of the ski resorts.

Cheers,

A

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YIKES!!! My dad just forwarded this to me:

 

----------

 

The SR-71...How slow could it fly?

 

Brian Shul, Retired SR-71 Blackbird Pilot via Plane and Pilot Magazine.

 

As a former SR-71 pilot and keynote speaker, the question I'm most often asked is: ”How fast would that SR-71 fly?” I can be assured of hearing that question several times at any event I attend.

It's an interesting question, given the aircraft' s proclivity for speed. But there really isn't a single number to give . . as the turbo ramjet would always give you a little more speed.

 

If you wanted it to.

 

It was common to see 35 miles a minute. But we typically flew a programmed Mach number. But because we never wanted to harm the plane in any way, we never let it run 'out' to any limits of temperature or speed. Thus, each SR-71 pilot had his own personal ' high ' speed that he saw
at some point during our missions.

 

I saw my highest speed over Libya when Khadafy fired two missiles my way with max power was in order.

 

Let's just say that the Blackbird truly loved speed . . and effortlessly took us to high Mach numbers we had not previously seen.

 

So it was with great surprise, when at the end of one of my presentations, someone asked : “What was the SLOWEST you ever flew the Blackbird ?”

 

This was a first. After giving it some thought, I was reminded of a story that I had never shared before, and relayed the following: I was flying the SR-71 out of RAF Mildenhall, England ,with my backseater, Walt Watson. We were returning from a mission over Europe and the Iron Curtain when we received a radio transmission from home base.

 

As we scooted across Denmark in three minutes, we learned that a small RAF base in the English countryside had requested an SR-71 fly-past.

 

The Commander of air cadets there was a former Blackbird pilot . . thought it would be a motivating moment for the young lads to see the mighty SR-71 perform a low approach.

 

No problem, we were happy to do it.

 

After a quick aerial refueling over the North Sea, we proceeded to find the small airfield. In the back seat, Walter had a myriad of sophisticated navigation equipment and he began to vector me toward the field.

 

Descending to subsonic, we found ourselves over a densely wooded area in the slight haze.

Like most former WWII British airfields, the one we were looking for had a small tower and little surrounding infrastructure. Walter told me we were close. And that I should be able to see the field.

But as far as I could see in the haze . . I saw nothing but trees. We got a little lower, and I pulled the throttles back from our 325 knot cruise.

 

With the gear up . . anything under 275 knots . . was plain uncomfortable. Walt said we're practically over the field. Looking hard. There was nothing in my windscreen.

 

I banked the jet and started a gentle circling maneuver, hoping to pick up anything that looked like a field. Meanwhile, below, the Commander had taken the Cadets up on the control tower's catwalk to get a prime view.

 

It was a quiet, still day with no wind and partial gray overcast. Walter continued to give me indications that the field should be below us. But in the overcast and haze, I couldn't see it.

But the longer we continued to circle and peer out, the slower we got. With our power back, the awaiting cadets had silence.

 

I must have had good instructors in my flying career, as something told me I better cross-check the gauges.

 

As I noticed the airspeed indicator s-l-i-d-e below 160 knots. My heart stopped as my adrenalin-filled left hand shoved both throttles FULL FORWARD!

 

At this point we weren't really flying, but were falling in a slight bank. Just at the moment both afterburners lit with a thunderous roar of flame and what a joyous feeling that was as the aircraft fell into full view of the shocked observers on the catwalk.

 

Shattering the absolute quiet of that morning, they now had 107 feet of fire-breathing titanium in their faces as the plane leveled and accelerated, in full burner, on the their side of the infield, much closer than expected, maintaining what could only be described as some sort of ultimate knife-edge aerobatic pass.

 

We proceeded back to Mildenhall without incident, not saying a word to each other for those next 14 minutes. After landing, our commander greeted us and we were both certain he was reaching for our wings.

 

Instead, he heartily shook our hands and said the Commander had told him it was the greatest SR-71 fly-past he had ever seen. Especially how we had surprised them with such a precise maneuver that could only be described as... breathtaking.

 

Some of the cadet's hats were blown off. The sight of the plan form of the plane in full afterburner, dropping right in front of them, was stunning. Unbelievable.

 

Walt and I both understood the concept of “breathtaking” very well that morning. And we sheepishly replied that the Cadets seemed just excited to see our low approach.

 

As we retired to the equipment room to change from space suits to flight suits, we just sat there. We hadn't spoken a word since the pass. Finally, Walter looked at me and said, “I saw One hundred fifty-six knots. What did you see?” Trying to find my voice I stammered, “One hundred fifty-two.”

We sat in silence for a moment. Then Walt calmly said, “Don't ever do that to me again.”

 

And I never did.

 

A year later, Walter and I were having lunch in the Mildenhall Officer' s club, and overheard an officer talking to some cadets about an SR-71 fly-past that he'd seen one day.

 

Of course by now the story included kids falling off the tower and screaming as the heat of the jet singed their eyebrows.

 

As we stood there with lunch trays in our hands, the officer noticed our HABU shoulder patch icon of a deadly snake asked us to verify to the Cadets that such an event occurred.

 

Walt just shook his head and said, “It was probably just a routine low approach. They're pretty impressive in that airplane.”

 

Impressive indeed.

 

Little did I realize that low speed experience would become one of the most requested of my stories. It's ironic that people now became very interested in how slow the world's fastest jet aircraft can fly.

Regardless of your speed it's always a good idea to keep up your instrument cross-check. I'm certain you'll agree.

 

However keep your Mach up, too.

 

Skyscrapers remember to keep yer mach up too.

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1983 "Investor's Special Edition" Turbo Esprit (#43/50) | 2012 Evora S

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Great story, Matt. Tell your dad "thanks." :)

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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My dad used to fly gliders, like the gentleman rogue (he is real...honest!) who administers this site. He still gets glider magazines and somewhere I'll have to have him dig up the issue (April Fool issue, that is) from a few years ago in which they created a fake ad for an incredibly elaborate gadget of surgical steel, a truss, and a catheter/bag, so that guys could keep flying without ever having to land to pee. It was priceless. Even more priceless was they got something like 200+ serious inquiries.

1983 "Investor's Special Edition" Turbo Esprit (#43/50) | 2012 Evora S

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  "...so that guys could keep flying without ever having to land to pee."

 

I think one of those inquiries might have been mine. :lol:

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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Freezer bags, apparently.

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Just found this...apparently there's a market for this dilemma.

(enlarge to 200% if need be...the picture, not the attached body part, you fool)

 

 

 

cockpit.jpg

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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There were a few complaints recently of glider pilots causing farmers problems. It seems a small bag of pee is delicious to our bovine friends however their digestion doesn't enjoy it as much. 

 

This is the solution for the lady pilot... I'll leave it to you to work out what bit does what! 

 

model_k.png

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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For the non-pilots:

ATIS is a radio broadcast to pilots from airports. It tells them latest weather, runways in use etc etc.

In the old days it was a tape loop that just repeated over and over until it was updated.

 

The story:

Many years ago a DanAir flight is running late and checks in with Aberdeen Approach,

"Aberdeen good morning this is F#######g DanAir xyz". There was a considerable pause before the air traffic controller replied, but with the official call sign. The DanAir pilot continued to use his 'version' in all exchanges. Even when transferred to the tower frequency for landing he checks in again,

"Tower this is F#######g DanAir xyz". He continues with this call sign until he has parked up at the gate.

 

Whereupon the pilot telephones the tower and insists that they should listen to their ATIS broadcast.

They did so and found:

 

"blah blah blah etc... end of information Foxtrot" in the pause before the tape restarted from the beginning another controller could clearly be heard shouting in the background "Where's that F#######g DanAir xyz"

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http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-25306936

 

Would I be right in saying that's it's extremely difficult to stop the rotor blades turning on a flying helicopter?

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I'm no "fling wing" expert, but I think helos have a rotor brake for use when parked on the tarmac. I would expect that it could not be applied in flight, and even if it could (through some sort of malfunction) it's difficult to believe that it could override a rapidly spinning (under normal powered flight conditions, as opposed to a power off lower RPM spindown at engine shutdown on the ground) set of blades.

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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I know that in something like an R22 there's not a lot of inertia in the blades so you have to be quick to flatten the pitch to autorotate but that's the exception rather than the rule.

 

Very odd, especially considering there weren't engine/gearbox problems.  

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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