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steve930

removing alloy coolant tubes

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Hi guys, does anyone know if its possible to remove the 15-16mm dia alloy coolant tubes that run through the inside of the backbone of the chassis. without having to pull the engine ??

 

I think the pipes i'm referring to are the flow & return to the heater matrix at the front of the car

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Hi, I'm afraid not. I had mine done not long after I bought the car. Apparrently it's a huge job as the engine has to come out and the pipes pulled out from the rear of the car.

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Is it not possable to drop the rad and bring them out the front.  On my 88 n/a the large bore rad pipes are fitted from the front and the small heater pipes are lower at the bottom of the chassis  backbone.  Not sure if the rack will be in the way.  Might be worth looking at before pulling the engine.

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would say:

 

'remove' would be possible, but only if you cut the end off everytime ..in other words -you need to make several pieces of 4cm long pipes out of everyone    (nothing you would like to have I guess ;)   )

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thanks for the input guys, i'm afraid that would be the case...

 

I'm thinking of pulling out the old pipes as gunter says, by cutting off short sections whilst at the same time pulling in some flexible double braided hose like the stuff in the link below

 

http://www.demon-tweeks.co.uk/motorsport/oil-hose/goodridge-200-series-fuel-oil-hose

 

I think being double braided etc it should be able to handle the temps & pressure issues over quite a long run of pipe.  If this stuff is suitable then i should at the same time be able to reduce the number of hose clip connections in the system

 

What are everyone's thoughts on this.

 

P.S. the engine came out for a full rebuild, including manifold studs, turbo coolant/oil lines etc etc only 2 yrs ago so i'm hoping to avoid having to remove it again

Edited by steve930

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I would imagine you would lose quite a lot of internal diameter using that rather than an ally pipe.  Is it possable to repair the pipe in situ?

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the link was just to represent the type of pipe.  I would plan on using the same internal diameter, i realise the external diameter will be bigger thus requiring the holes in the backbone yo be enlarged

 

Where the rubber hose clamps onto the alloy one is where the leak is eminating from.  Using a boroscope i can see that there is alot of calcification build up on the alloy.  If i can draw the alloy pipe back towards the engine to gain access then i may be able to clean this off with a wire wheel, but i imagine there is a very high chance that doing this may well reveal corroded holes in the pipe.  Therefore i'm trying to have a solution in place

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first try should be to open up the water circuit, pull the pipe out far enough ..and simply reposition the hose on one end if possible.

 

as I would guess there is only the leak where the rubber is ..just as you say

 

 

-otherwise the whole pipe would have gone long ago (as it is only fixed inside of the chassis with additional sloted sectiomns of water hose as protective 'layer' and some straps so it can still vibrate)

 

..if you open up the holes in the chassis -keep in mind that you still need protective layers around the hole and that it will rust now, as the coating is damaged afterwards.

 

If you plan to use the simple type of hose that is shown in your link, use cheaper one from ebay ..as this type of single nitril hose isn't really worth to be called a fuel resistant hose from my point of view, for OEM specification every manufacturer would at least choose a verry different type than that. So for ordinary water-cooling systems with 'antifreeze' every rubber hose will do for less money anyway   .. if you plan to add an chargecooling to the V8, why not runn a pair of those hoses under the chassis on one side , and 'feed & return' for the chargecooler on the other ?  .. with this you only have the main radiator pipes running in the centre section of the chassis, and less heat that come into the cabin/ centre armrest/shifter.

 

Other point is :

 

 as it is "only" the heater -why not fit hoses into the inner diameter of the suspicius alluminium tubing .. as a simple 'guide' ?  .. you could choose rubber hose with thin wall type, and as the support is done from the alloy tubing it would not crumple and hold pressure

Edited by Günter

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thanks for the advice gunter thats some good ideas you've given me.   :cheers:  

 

I might re-route under the chassis as you suggest, but make up/fit an alloy crash pan the length of the backbone just for added protection

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thanks for the advice gunter thats some good ideas you've given me.   :cheers:  

.. I'm known for my 'strange ways of thinking' ..some don't like that I say what I say  but I don't care -

 

-you can call it a 'life in simple terms' ..or "it is just water running into the heater and back"  :D

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Just a thought Steve, when I replaced mine (with stainless of the same ID and OD and engine was out at the time), I found that through the chassis tunnel there are bulkhead sections with grommets that supported the pipe.  Plus some clever soul had cable tied things to them too.

 

Just a heads up for both removal and to aid your re-fitting thoughts.

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Simon, just as I said earlier -with the grommets and the cable ties.. those are in there, and short 'cut-off' sections from hoses ..splitted in half as some sound insulation/abrasion protection. The cable ties hold the smaller heater alloy-pipes to the ground of the chassis section, and are attached to the cross sections in it ( I mean the small round metall pieces, who are welded into the chassis, to screw the body & seatbelt onto the chassis as it looks -or at least: if someone looks into the center section of the chassis it looks like small steel tubes welded into the chassis-ends across). As per factory the oil-cooler hoses are also there, cable-tied to the alloy pipes

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Are you guys driving your cars full time in the winter through heavily salted roads to get all this corrosion?  It's amazing how bad some of the Esprits look from the bottom in the UK.  Here in the US, people put their sports cars away in the winter as soon as the salt trucks show up.  But in Southern Texas, those trunks never come and my cars still look new underneath after 15+ years.  My Esprit is new to me, but 15 years old and all the bolts and metal bits look new.

Edited by lotusespritse

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UK is wet ..in every way

 

-so even we on the continent have to take a closer look on 'used imports' from the RHD

 

 

Would say for a '98 modell with first road registration in '99 my looks good to ..even for the style and purpose it is used over all the time (trakdays, fun rides, daily commute, industrial-transports...).

It was used as real *all season* daily-driver the first three years of my ovnership from 2003 on (had no other car registered in those days..)

 

-now this winters season it is out on the road again, with special specification wheel-set legally in Europe ..so fun in the snow & ice again  

 

..so far I can't say bad things about the car in urban areas on the wet/freshly snowed roads .. not much traction, but that's a problem for most cars  ..  the cabin is small, so the heater can work fast and the windscreen is clear  ..from my impression the 'crunches' and sounds are not as loud as in summer in the bodywork, maybee it is just for the lower overall speed I do now

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my car was in daily use until approx 2-3 years ago (in all weathers)  The chassis is still in good order, likewise all the suspension arms etc  but all of the pipes/hoses under the car were in very poor condition

 

During my ownership i still use the car at least once a week in all weathers, infact its pouring with rain as i type this but i'm still going out in the lotus in about an hours time :thumbsup:

 

I've always been a great believer of using a vehicle as often as possible,  i live about 8 miles from the nearest town and all the roads are 50/60 mph limits so everytime the car gets used it gets used properly :D

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IIRC its just a case of removing gear lever etc to gain access inside the bavkbone & removing any cable ties et so on

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there is a good 'picture documentary' on several stations of the Esprit build-process  ..

 

it was posted (or is?) in the web -Brian should still have the document

Edited by Günter

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you can, all you need is to copy the thumbnails into the post directly ..and/or keep an eye on *html-endlines (as the boards seems not to like some form of server-adressing)

 

Ahh ..see here -this should be the legendary *build of* ..it was also available in library-type (*pdf) some years ago, for open download via grouplotus ..long time gone I guess

 

http://www.espritv8build.co.uk/

Edited by Günter

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was something wrong with the Espritv8build.com -Link ??  ..why the 'repost' ?

Edited by Günter

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