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Ryanair eject passenger over hand luggage


pete

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Police in Valencia were filmed ejecting a ryanair passenger from the plane over a dispute about her hand luggage

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/aviation/9650681/Camera-captures-Ryanair-passenger-ejection-for-wrong-hand-luggage.html

hindsight: the science that is never wrong

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I have not heard very complimentary things about Ryanair, but it is very likely that there is much more to the story than just the carry on item or items.

"At home, I have a King Sized bed. Now, I don't know any Kings, but I would imagine if one were to come over, he would be comfortable." -Mitch Hedberg

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Another case of "You can book your flight, but you can't flight your book."

 

Or was that "You can stroll aboard, but you can't board your scroll."

 

:getmecoat:

Being second is to be the first of the ones who lose.

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Yet people still continue to fly with them .....

Some people will always take the cheapest option and dont mind the treatment or conditions!

I transport Horses in better conditions!!!

Dont worry,be happy.............

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I've always found easyjet to be very basic, crowded bus from the terminal to the plane etc but the price reflects this. If I wanted a covered walkway to the door and copy of the Mail when I sat down, I'd pay 3 times as much and fly BA. 

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I cannot but concurr with Mr Bibbo. If I wanted to fly like a Sardine I have the option of Easyfret or Ryandare.

 

However, when I book my Holiday I always opt for a more expensive flight, normally the next step up, Monarch or Thompson. At least I get food, treated like a human and last time an upgraded seat!

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I used AirAsia on my Cambodian adventure. They were OK no major disasters or complaints.

But ! I'm 5'4" and less than 70 kilos, leg room is not an issue for me, but Tony sure got some extra seating into those Airbus's and it's more cramped than I have previously experienced.

So the real question is would I use them again, answer, I'd need to be saving a good few hundred dollars to even consider it.

Cheap yes, value for money, the jury's still out.

Life is like a sewer, what you get out of it, depends on what you put into it. (Tom Leahrer)

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I have flown RyanAir once-as above, never again. And in general I hate the mean-spirited profiteering of it ; instead of "it`s cheap but we still aim to give you a nice experience and even some value for money " , it`s "Yes it`s cheap. And . Don`t. You . Forget. It !" Civilisation was neither built or sustained on such premises... 

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The cheap airlines aren't always the cheapest though. You look at the price they advertise then add the credit card fee, then add luggage, then add online check in fee etc etc. We flew Jet 2 to Venice last year and it would have actually been around the same to go with BA. And with BA I get lounge access.

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With the amount of time you spend at airports, you should have your own lounge :lol:

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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I used AirAsia on my Cambodian adventure. They were OK no major disasters or complaints.

But ! I'm 5'4" and less than 70 kilos, leg room is not an issue for me, but Tony sure got some extra seating into those Airbus's and it's more cramped than I have previously experienced.

So the real question is would I use them again, answer, I'd need to be saving a good few hundred dollars to even consider it.

Cheap yes, value for money, the jury's still out.

Air Aia is ace. But other than RyanAir you can easily add extra luggage. Bangkok - Phuket - Singapore, 2 pax, 2 luggage with 25kg and 30kg, golfbags with 30kg, seats in 1st row with extra legspace... €400 all in, including insurance, taxes, fees. You can't even book such a package with the European low cost carriers, they will try to fuck with you and get your last penny. Exception is Air Berlin, but they don't know themselves whether they are quality or low cost carrier, that's why they struggle economically.

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My first EasyJet experience was Santorini to LGW last summer and overall I was happy and it was about what I expected for the price (plus non stop)

Paddle Faster, I hear Banjos!
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It's not just the passengers who get treated with disdain by Ryanair....this from the "Irish Times", about pilot trainees being stranded in Florida...

 

A total of 2,000 aspiring pilots applied for a cadetship last January, the first time in 20 years Aer Lingus recruited in such a fashion. Only 20 places were on offer for a Spanish-based training course followed by further training in Dublin.

Other leading European airlines also offer similar programmes, all of which are oversubscribed. Not only are there no fees to be paid, but the trainees receive salaries from these airlines.

Ryanair, on the other hand, will recruit fresh graduates from training colleges – indeed, most of the stranded trainees probably had this airline earmarked for a job application.

But there is no guarantee they would have made the Ryanair grade. And even if they were accepted, they would face further costs, with the company seeking a further fee, upwards of €30,000, to be trained to fly its Boeing 737-800 aircraft.

While training, over a period of several months, they would receive very little pay. The Irish Airline Pilots Association president, Capt Evan Cullen, said yesterday that his members had encountered such trainees sleeping in their cars at airports because they could not afford accommodation.

In fact, many self-sponsored pilot trainees have to spend upwards of €150,000 on training fees and living expenses while earning hardly a penny in order to make the commercial airline grade.

Others who take the self-funded route, but who fail to secure a deal with any of the low-cost carriers, will attempt to start at the bottom and seek jobs with small commuter airlines.

Pay rates in such airlines are often modest. Trainees will work for nothing and rates are often less than €10,000 a year for a qualified co-pilot. Even captains will be lucky to earn €30,000 a year in some instances.

A US congressional inquiry into a fatal commuter airline crash at Buffalo, New York in 2009 revealed that the captain earned just €54,000 and the co-pilot less than €20,000. Neither could afford a hotel room and slept on chairs the night before the crash, in which 50 died. Fatigue was blamed as a contributory cause.

Assuming that the self-sponsored trainees are lucky enough to land a job with Ryanair, their future is not cut and dried. Most will never work directly for the airline, but be employed as freelances via a series of subcontracting companies. They must form a limited company with two others and look after their own pension, taxation and social welfare arrangements. By agreeing to work “off the books”, they sign away their rights as employees. There is no guaranteed minimum income and they have no right of redress if they are dismissed or given no work.

 

 

The airline world isn't what it used to be....

Scientists investigate that which already is; Engineers create that which has never been." - Albert Einstein

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..The airline world isn't what it used to be....

..it's the same in the world of engineering, there are many engineers in the industry now 'contracted freelancers' from agencies  ..as the manufacturers need to be competitive not only on the market of cars, as also on the stock-market and shareholder value ;)

that's why production is outsourced, and even development is done as cheap as possible 

-so "to go there where the fresh and tasty water is"  I'm more focused now on the stock-exchange world with

my private money, than on working in the engineering-job .. a 'secure' job I 'maybe can get' in future with my certificates

..and I would not wonder if several young engineers from universities end in a totally different world

-the good point is that I have learned and done a more practical job prior to the adventures of the Masters-certificate ..if there is a need to do the traditional "Nine to Fife thing"

Edited by Günter

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to name the things if I see them, that's what I call integrity..

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