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Hi guys im trying to get two window motors for my 1993 Esprit can anyone help ?i think they are made by DELCO or can anyone tell me a compatible type thanks Randal [email protected] thanks

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Hi There - I have just checked out www.sjsportscars.co.uk and they have both in stock.

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I've not been near my window motors for a few years but if the Excels I've been working on recently are anything to go by you'll find most window motors are interchangeable as long as they have the correct number of teeth and correctly orientated (left /' right hand).

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WINDOW LIFT MOTOR - HOW TO REBUILD

Lotus window motors are pretty unique. They were manufactured by Delco UK. They have 10 teeth, 18 mm diameter gear wheel, which is much smaller than any Jaguar, (22 mm gear wheel). Sometimes, Esprit OEM motors have 8 teeth, BUT the gear wheel is always small (18mm, or 23/32"). It is extremely difficult to match any Jag motors, so it is more practical to rebuild your old one.

Motor Failure Mode: in most cases, the armature does not burn out. Something else fails, like brushes, magnets, circuit breaker, contacts, etc.

1. Usually, the glue between permanent magnets and the “can” (housing) fails. High humidity and high temperatures cause parts separation. Loose magnets grab the armature and motor shaft does not move freely. Current overload trips the safety breaker inside the motor every time the window switch is activated. Flexible contact inside the breaker capsule cycles excessively and bends out of the factory preset position. Motor "acts" dead, but it may just need a simple repair or adjustment.

To disassemble the motor, unscrew two torx head screws and separate can from the gear box. Pull the armature and check windings for continuity using a good eye and moving coil ohm-meter (non-digital), or simply a test light. If any one winding is burned, buy used Delco motor and swap the guts. Hang-on to the original gear box, since it has pretty unique bolt pattern and back spacing.

Clean the can inside with (ole'-good chlorinated, flammable (!)) Brake or Carb Cleaner fluid. Mark the desired magnet position (depth, distance from the flange), with a soft pencil. Use plenty of "miracle" Gorilla Glue (thick Cyanoacrylate), to re-attach magnets, one at the time. This glue cures very fast and there is no time for magnet re-positioning, so a steady hand is a must. Let it cure for a couple of hours.

Before you start the next step, get yourself good magnifying goggles.

2. If you can hear "cycling" (motor stops working after one second or half way trough the lift cycle), you'll need to rebuild/recalibrate the overload capsule (internal circuit breaker). The most tedious part of the job is opening the bi-metallic breaker capsule. It looks like a 3/8" x ¾" copper box located at the side of the brush aperture. It has two crimped edges with a double sided sticky foam tape between the flanges, which acts as an isolator. You should hold the capsule with the pliers and use a thin stubby knife to pry the crimped edges 1/2 way open. Take your time. Using flat nose mini pliers, bend one of the flanges bit further, almost to 90 deg position. I had to grind one side of the pliers jaw to thin out its profile. Be gentle enough not to shred the adhesive tape, since it acts as an isolator between two halves of the capsule. Next, insert a very thin pin or blade (exacto knife w/ sharp point) between capsule lower half and the tape, gently pry it open and separate the upper shell from the base. Be careful not to hurt the tape! It will open like an oyster shell. Once you get it open, clean the contacts and bend upward the bi-metallic strip of metal with the contact button attached. Use the jeweler's thin blade screwdriver to do that. You have to use your "best judgment" how much to bend it. Do not mess with the silver-ish strip since that is a bi-metallic element. Close the capsule. You don't have to bend capsule flanges back. The tape will hold it together. Also, it will be easier to work with the capsule in the future, should you need further adjustments.

*Now, you can insert the armature. First, using a thin pin or dental pick, pull both arms of the brush springs away from the axis of the armature and rest them on the edge of the plastic housing, just above the slot. Next, push brushes outboard into the housing to clear the stator. Apply hi-temp, hi-Molybdenum or graphite grease over the rear end and the worm gear, and insert the armature by screwing it into the gear box until it bottoms out. Push the brush spring ends down until they snap into the slots pushing brushes toward the stator. Rotate the armature clockwise by hand to verify that brush blocks contact the stator. Next, holding the gear tight, slide the motor can w/ magnets over the armature. If you don’t hold on to the gear tightly, magnets will pull the armature out of the gear box and beyond the brush blocks. Ooops, and you will have to start all over again, (go back to *).

Additionally, I have replaced the regular (burned-out) window fuses at the fuse perch (fuse # 30 & #34), with automatic 20A contact breakers (cost $5 in NAPA store). This gives you an additional protection in case you have over-bent the strip inside of the motor capsule/breaker.

When done with this repair, before you install the door moisture barrier, it is a good practice to install an additional plastic "bib" or apron over the top of the gear case and the motor to deflect any water entering doors.

Addition of a relay circuit modification and extra grounding wires from the motor mounting screw to the beam, will increase longevity of your switches.

Check this

http://www.thelotusforums.com/forums/index.php/topic/3424-electric-window-motor-has-died/

Edited by MrDangerUS

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I used these, but required adapting the lift mechanism to the motor.  very easy but required a welder.  windows are much faster now.

http://www.diypowerwindowrepair.com/store/p/966-1978-1993-Volvo-Front-Left-Window-Regulator-with-Motor.html

The link wont let me see it.

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I get this                 Access to this web site is denied for your IP Address: 85.210.---.--- Contact [email protected]

Edited by mdw

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wow well I guess if you intend to order you will have to do that.

unfortunately I don't remember exactly what I did to fit these except remove the extra arm,  z bend the main arm to intercept the window lift track and relocate the ashtray retaining screw an inch off center to avoid fouling the bull gear.  then later I decided to fit the original arm to this assy at 20 or so degrees off axis via welding in order to center the travel of the motor to the bull gear.  both ways worked great I believe and easy to do, but the last method was more proper in my mind.   using these, the speed was slightly faster but no longer hesitated at spots on raising, probably due to fresh motors and springs.  order left and right

 

post-144-0-22545800-1371254833.jpg

Edited by ragingfool35

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