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Understanding "English/American/Australian"


ramjet

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So I was talking to someone in the UK and jokingly told him I 'got a pineapple' for something and that it stung.

He didn't know what I meant until I explained it to him. He had never heard the saying.

Basically, it covers copping it when you've done something wrong.

Imagine the pineapple being inserted into a bodily orifice big end first and you get the idea.

i.e. I'm going to get a pineapple for this!

Probably similar to the American use of the word 'fanny' for a persons butt. Certainly, not what it is used for down here in the colonies.

What other ones do you all know of?

All we know is that when they stop making this, we will be properly, properly sad.Jeremy Clarkson on the Esprit.

Opinions are like armpits. Everyone has them, some just stink more than others.

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One that used to break me up when I moved to Oz in 72 was the other school kids asking me if I had any Durex in my satchel !!

Over here of course it meant cello-tape.

Both amusing and at the same time disappointing as it was a girl that asked me the first time and I thought my luck was in. :D

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Thought this would be a fun topic. Words that mean something different in English English as opposed to American English or Aussie English. Give us a funny sentence with it in to highlight it!

 

So, my starter for 10 is:

 

English/American: Bonnet and Hood. Wierdly each word means the same in reverse. A hood is a head covering in the UK whilst a hood is a bonnet in America, but a Bonnet is a head covering in America whilst being a hood in English! "My bonnets a little dented"

 

English/Australian: Ripper. As in "That's a ripper" meaning a cracker in English. Whilst the only ripper we know is Jack!

Possibly save your life. Check out this website.
http://everyman-campaign.org/

 

Distributor for 'Every Male' grooming products. (Discounts for any TLF members hairier than I am!)

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I wrote this a while back for reMarque

 

Common Language

 

 

 

 

            George Bernard Shaw purportedly once said "England and America are two countries separated by the same language".

            This is no more true than when it comes to cars.  Across the pond, what we call a hood is a bonnet. Their hood is our convertible top.  A trunk is a boot and fenders are wings.  If you ask for a wrench you will get a quizzicle look until you ask for a spanner instead.  And when you are behind a slower car you don't "flash to pass" you "dip your beams".  Even more confusing is car type nomenclature.  We all know that there is really not much difference between a Convertible, Cabriolet, and Roadster (at least now a days).  But the Brits have the additional designation of Drop Head Coupe. If you have a beer in a Saloon in this country you'll be ok, but if you do it in England you'll be driving a Sedan while under the influence.  Trucks are Lorries. Campers are Caravans.  We drive Station Wagons, while in England you drive an Estate, unless of course you drive a Rolls Royce, then it is a Shooting Brake! What?

            In England, a car engineered to derive performance from a modestly powered albeit finely designed engine, combined with light weight and exemplary handling, with dramatic styling and elegant design is called a Lotus.  Hey, same thing over here!.....but you already knew that. 

Kyle Kaulback

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This could go pear shaped real quick! (trans) This could end up in a mess.

All we know is that when they stop making this, we will be properly, properly sad.Jeremy Clarkson on the Esprit.

Opinions are like armpits. Everyone has them, some just stink more than others.

For forum issues, please contact one of us Moderators.

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My favorite was when my British born co-worker told his American wife that he was "going to go round and knock up the baby sitter"...

 

Means something totally different in America! 

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Travis

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Guest Mutley00

I remember when we were playing the American World Student Games Footy team in the 90s and as we approached the pitch and it was apparent it was rock hard, I told my mate I would be wearing 'rubbers' (moulded soles) for the match, to the horror of the Americans players just in front of us who obviously were expecting some very close marking!

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The old Jasper Carrott "Lay the table" comes to mind.

An Australian surgeon I used to work with said Redheads were Blueys and rubbish was Garbo.

In my role I talk about "straddling" and apparently there is no German word that means the same thing.

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"Spotted Dick" is a dessert here in the UK. Something totally different in the USA.

Possibly save your life. Check out this website.
http://everyman-campaign.org/

 

Distributor for 'Every Male' grooming products. (Discounts for any TLF members hairier than I am!)

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