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Lambo Huracan


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I agree Richard , I didn't like the lastest Esprit rendering that much as it was just another Lambo look alike.

 

. Don't get me wrong I dont dislike the Lambo's but I think each car should be different with its own character.

Edited by gghc87

Cliff

Men marry women with the hope they will never change. Women marry men with the hope they will change. Invariably they are both disappointed. : Albert Einstein

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Most 'supercars' are for posers but there are a lot more of them than people who only car about how the car drives, hence the wholesale move towards paddleshift autos. Lambo are boasting about how easy the new car is to drive already.

 

However I like Lamborghini. Created out of sheer spite towards Ferrari, the brand has always been a two fingers to the establishment. I also like the way they don't do an 'entry level' car as such, both cars are ballistically fast, historically there's not much in it between the Gallardo and the Murcielago. You just choose whether you want a big one or a small one and a V10 scream versus a V12 scream.

 

As a brand Ferrari and Porsche are so serious and stuffy, droning on about their motorsport heritage. You're not allowed to smile in your Ferrari or Porsche, in fact a grumpy scowl seems de rigeur. However in a Lambo you can and should drive around laughing your head off. It's just a fast means of getting from one party to another. Less golf club, more night club.

 

I think the new car will look sensational in real life but in pics it's a bit too like an Aventador that shrunk in the wash. I liked the way there was less of a family resemblance before.

 

Looks better from this angle:

 

Lamborghini_Huracan_2014_001_zps903d97ae

 

 

And those exhausts are decent and it's good to know that engine cover slats still cut it in 2013!

 

Lamborghini-Huracan-press-shot-rear-silv

 

But here's a question. Looks like the engine red line is lower than before. Capacity is still 5.2 litres yet power is up to 610bhp. How is that possible?

 

Lamborghini_Huracan_2014_502_zps2b269bce

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I think that Lamborghini looks ok, but it follows the generic supercar shape and looks a little safe. They've tried to do what most car manufactures do and have a house style (they've taken design cues from the Aventador). They could done something more interesting with the headlights and splitter.

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As all the styling looks pretty much the same is the real problem with the designers who pen these in the first place ?

Cliff

Men marry women with the hope they will never change. Women marry men with the hope they will change. Invariably they are both disappointed. : Albert Einstein

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Surely part of the problem is that cars have to be aerodynamically efficient now, they didn't use wind tunnels in the 70's for road cars so it was just whatever the designer liked the look of. They don't have the freedom they used to. Plus there's loads of legistlation to comply with too.

 

Still, if the foul Veneno is anything to go by perhaps it's better that Lambo's designers don't let their hair down too often!

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"Most 'supercars' are for posers but there are a lot more of them than people who only car about how the car drives, hence the wholesale move towards paddleshift autos"

 

Automated gearboxes are ubiquitous in the motor racing world these days, and therefore, a natural component in any vehicle which aspires to deliver the best performance.  An increasing number of the most exotic cars do not have a manual option for this reason, and not because 'poseurs' demand it.

 

Where manual gearboxes are offered, the best tend to be in cars whose engines are at the front and whose gearstick connects right to the box underneath, something Lotus tend not do do, which explains why Lotus gearchanges are notoriously shit.

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Nonetheless it is true that most supercars are bought for the show and never tracked or even driven anywhere near their performance limits. But, considering the price of these cars would you take the risk of doing so?

If you have the choice between a Stairway to Heaven and a Highway to Hell don't forget the Nomex®!

Captain,  Lotus Airways. We fly lower! 

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Name one racing car with an 'automated gearbox' or double clutch gearbox for that matter. Oh dear, there aren't any.

Most racing cars use sequential, fully manual boxes where possible. I'm guessing another thing you don't know about is that F1 cars are forced to use paddles to change gears under the regulations. They wouldn't have any gears at all if they were allowed.

DSG boxes are very popular because it makes fast cars easy to drive, particularly where poseurs like to drive - densely populated areas. No point in showing off on a deserted welsh mountain road is there? Sheep aren't easily impressed!

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And again, another off-topic post. This is not a topic about drivers cars. It is about the design similarities.

With all your claimed automotive knowledge, I find it astonishing you can write so much and yet say so little.

Why don't you kiss my ass….

 

I claim nothing but some jack off like you feels the need to nip at my heels all the time. 

Edited by ronin

I think it's fast enough…maybe

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"F1 cars are forced to use paddles to change gears under the regulations. They wouldn't have any gears at all if they were allowed."

 

 

I'm amazed that an F1 car can go as fast as 90ish mph in first, but it's going a bit far to say that gears are forced on the F1 teams. They all seem to get quite a bit more speed out of their cars with a few more cogs thrown into the mix.

 

http://www.chacha.com/question/how-fast-can-a-formula-1-car-go-in-first-gear

 

Funnily enough, Lotus were at the forefront of drivers' aids which aimed to increase performance via new technology:

 

"The development of electronic driver aids began during the 1980s. Lotus began to develop a system of active suspension which first appeared during 1982 on the 91. By 1987, this system had been perfected and was driven to victory by Ayrton Senna in the Monaco Grand Prix that year. In the early 1990s other teams followed suit and semi-automatic gearboxes and traction controlwere a natural progression. The FIA, due to complaints that technology was determining the outcome of races more than driver skill, banned many such aids for 1994. This resulted in cars that were previously dependent on electronic aids becoming very "twitchy" and difficult to drive (particularly the Williams FW16). Many observers felt the ban on driver aids was in name only as they "proved difficult to police effectively".[23]"

 

(From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Formula_One)

 

So actually, it's the racing companies which have been at the forefront of using technology to improve driver performance, and the authorities have been generally imposing rules to limit the effectiveness of such technologies in the name of keeping the human's skill at the forefront of the chances of success or failure.

 

Automated gearboxes are one of those technologies that were allowed to remain.

 

Please do keep the pearls of wisdom coming though. It is wonderful to be in the presence of a real driver, and not a poseur, dentist or merchant banker.

Edited by cnapan
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The keyy point in all gearboxes is the time it takes to switch gears. In racing that is time without engine power and thus lost opportunity. And exactly the reason racing cars, including F1 have gone to paddle switched gearboxes, be they sequential, manual/electric or dual clutch. Manual gearboxes are only used where anything else is prohibied by the regulations - not the other way around.

 

Now, if you look at the Porsche numbers with the PDK shift times are down to 100 milliseconds! No way you can beat that with any manual gearbox.


And again, another off-topic post. This is not a topic about drivers cars. It is about the design similarities.

With all your claimed automotive knowledge, I find it astonishing you can write so much and yet say so little.

 

 

Why don't you kiss my ass….

 

I claim nothing but some jack off like you feels the need to nip at my heels all the time. 

Calm down both of you!

 

I'm happy to read most of the responses Frank has to offer, on the other hand I won't always agree to his language.

 

Otherwise bibs may have to put both in the silly room. :harhar:

If you have the choice between a Stairway to Heaven and a Highway to Hell don't forget the Nomex®!

Captain,  Lotus Airways. We fly lower! 

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Oh dear. You two seem to have swallowed the marketing line whole and without questioning.

 

Most race cars use sequential manual boxes with dog gears that can be forced through without using the clutch. If you fit flat shift software you can keep your foot flat and force the gear home, the ecu cutting the throttle momentarily to save the gearbox. Otherwise it's you that has to lift. These fully manual gearboxes are very strong, light and very efficient - just what you need for racing. They offer fewer transmission losses too so more of the power of your engine gets to your rear tyres. The only difference is a sequential shift pattern which is simpler to use under extreme pressure than a road h-pattern. Most race cars still use this system with a stick, not paddles, however the same gearbox can be used with paddles, as per the Exige V6 Cup, but it's still a sequential manual, not an automatic of any kind. It also costs the thick end of £25k on its own and is totally unsuitable for road use being incredibly noisy and whiny for a start.

 

Porsche's gearbox shifts in milliseconds but it still can't miss gears can it? A manual can go from 6th to 2nd, or 5th to 1st in one shift. So in some circumstances a manual can be faster if that's all that matters. But lets not let that get in the way of perpetuating 'F1-derived' urban poser gearbox myth. Porsche's tiptronic was never promoted as motorsport derived in any way. It was one of the fastest ways you could ruin a Porsche. I also had a tiptronic system in an Audi S8 for a (short) while (they didn't offer a manual). It was utterly, utterly dreadful. Try and time your gearshifts 'manually' and you'd normally shift up twice as the computer went for another gear as well. Do that while overtaking and it's not just rubbish, it's genuinely dangerous. As with modern paddleshifts you're better off and faster leaving the car in 'D'. As such it became quickly associated with posers while the drivers opted for manual. But since paddles have been adopted as an option instead of Porsche's retarded button system, these are 'F1 derived' so that gets you past the image problem. No more embarassing kangarooing or graunching of gears on the King's road and - bingo! - they're queuing round the block to buy them. Does anyone honestly think they are being bought because of any kind of performance advantage?!

 

All the while F1 cars would have done away with paddles years ago if they were allowed! It's honestly farcical that it's being sold as a performance aid. The FIA insisted that the driver has to change gears (as opposed to the car doing it for him) so actually make the F1 cars SLOWER and also to allow some element of human error to help spice the racing up a bit.

 

By the way some modern paddleshifts still have the hopeless 'tiptronic' problem of shifting up for you at the redline, so if you mis-time your paddles you will shift up twice again, which is stupid and dangerous. Then you have to shift back down a gear to get the car going again, meanwhile a manual would have smoked you into the sunset! No wonder most people just leave them in 'D'. Check out Richard Meaden's 918 Spyder video, he doesn't touch the paddles at all! That's the reality of 'paddleshift'.

 

cnapan look up CVT on wikipedia. That's what F1 cars would use if they were allowed. Who needs millisecond shifts when you can have no shifts at all! So one day that will be sold as the ultimate performance transmission, nurburgring laptimes may even be reduced. But so will driver involvement.

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On further reading I was quite surprised to read that CVT is making a come-back:

 

http://www.caranddriver.com/features/how-cvt-transmissions-are-getting-their-groove-back-feature

 

Especially interesting was the chance they might be combined with motors in electric cars... which at first sight seems an unnecessary thing to do...

 

Also - I'm not sure reliability matters too much in F1 - as long as it lasts as long as normal gearboxes and engines (which don't last that long at all for F1 at least)

 

 

Finally, I should have offered to pits acceptance that when (s)he said that F1 wanted to do away with gears, CVT is that! (Well I'm not sure if all the gear would go, but the need for a choice of gear-implemented ratios would...

 

Sorry for dragging the thread to CVT. Merry Christmas!

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But here's a question. Looks like the engine red line is lower than before. Capacity is still 5.2 litres yet power is up to 610bhp. How is that possible?

 

I'd put it down to gas-exchange cycle refinement and remapped engine management...

 

I can't be bothered to look up the specs but is it using any kind of VVA/VVT tech?

 

Oh and +1 on the Engine Slats comment - it really was missing from the Gallardo despite the fact I like glassbacks. Doesn't look right without them on a Lambo (or an Esprit S3 for that matter...)

Vanya Stanisavljevic '91 Esprit SE | '97 XK8

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  • 2 weeks later...

Whatever it's like as a driving machine, the Gallardo certainly has showroom appeal, with its dramatic styling, beautifully-finished interiors and fantastic-sounding engines.  Most people can't drive most cars to anywhere near the car's limits on a public road as the cars are so fast.  Remember the M100 being marketed as a can that 90% of drivers could drive at 90% of its potential 90% of the time?  You probably couldn't even do that in a Golf GTi nowadays.  That's one of the reasons the not-so-fast MX5 is so popular.

 

Ferraris, Lamborghinis, high-end Audis, Mercedes, Maseratis, etc. are all too quick to thrash like you could a baby Elan or Europa so, as long as they are comfortable, give impressive acceleration figures, get good write-ups in the magazines, have a known name and are too expensive for the common man, they are in with a shout of selling well.

S4 Elan, Elan +2S, Federal-spec, World Championship Edition S2 Esprit #42, S1 Elise, Excel SE

 

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