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Sparky

Coolant pipes through chassis - unusual fix

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I am very lucky in that the previous owner replaced the though chassis ones in my car with stainless (apparently) - they do seem to develop pinholes and then the insides look like they are full of stalactites. When I had the coolant pipe replaced in the engine bay (the curved one with the otter switch) it was 3/4 blocked with deposits.... How the car cooled at all is a mystery. 

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Wasn't that exactly what I suggested in my earlier message or am I missing something in that picture of yours Sparky. 

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An interesting repair. I know there have been a few problems with these alloy pipes leaking and the difficulties in removing them from the car. I wonder whether anyone has just pulled these through a bit at a time, cut them up whilst pulling silicon or rubber pipes through as replacement. I guess there must have been a reason why alloy was used (chaffing perhaps) but I would have thought the alternative should give a durable replacement. 

No, The pic was of both pipes and we made only one cut on each and removed throught the gearchange aperture.


I'll get around to it at some point.

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OK Watford Exotics!  I have an hole in my Rad that needs mending... Do you offer mobile service?  

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Oooh - Callout service? May/June? :-)


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Nice bodge workaround. All you have to do to improve that would be to install a small Kenwood engine pre-heater for toasty starts on frosty mornings...

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Unfortunately, ran out of cable ties...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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You can't prove nuffin.

Oh, hang on...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Fantastic.  Replacements in, GT3 running, everything fine.  Trev, Chris and I had the job done in a tad over 2 hours.

 

The solution was ludicrously cheap - less than £20 for everything to replace both chassis heater pipes.  More importantly, it negated the need to pull the engine.  When i DO need to pull it, then I might replace them with rigid pipe again.

 

The entire job, removal, head-scratching, design and replacement took approx 5 hours.  In future I'd say it's 3 hours for 2 people.

 

Learnt a lot along the way - would certainly change the pipe design to make it much easier to fit!  The rear hose fittings are really difficult.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Thought I might try Astons next.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Sparky,

 

Would you recommend replacing the heater pipes? I'm just about to pull my engine out.

 

As for trying something different my friend has a Buggati T35 ;)

 

Chris

Edited by red vtec
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Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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Chris, if the engine's out it's a no-brainer.  Unless you enjoy pain...


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Would silicon pipe be better?


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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Coincidentally, we were discussing that! There are multiple considerations , most related to dimensions rather than material. I should really write this up as a guide to pipe replacement with engine insitu. Meanwhile, if you want to give me a call tonight, it's worth a quick chat. I think you have my number?


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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Excellent catering division.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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No tea? :huh:


88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Caught in a pincer movement. I know when to give up.


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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BUMP!  Ready to reveal?

 

Reason being, have encountered disintegrating coolant pipes (chargecooler circuit, actually) in my friend's S4s, and can't figure how to replace them without pulling the engine!  :help:


Atwell Haines

'88 Esprit

Succasunna, NJ USA

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Happy to reveal whatever you need!  But I suspect most of the answers are already in this thread.  However, to recap...

 

First job is to try and narrow down the leak source.  It may be just the end of a pipe where a rubber hose joins, in which case it could be a simple fix.

 

If it's worse than that, then you need to remove the entire gearchange unit.  I suggest freeing off the cables completely at the gearbox end to permit the master unit to be pulled out and give unfettered access to the tunnel.  Again, they to identify whether the leak is a simple one, like Alan's, that can be sleeved (unlikely).

 

If the pipes need removing, remove the hose at either end.  Remove front hose first, as this will allow you to pull the pipes through from the back - access to jubilee clips here is poor.

 

There's no clearance to remove the pipes front or rear.  However, if you cut them in half using a Dremel or similar in the master gearchange aperture, you'll be able to bend and pull through bit by bit (hence my earlier photo of curved pipes).  This could probably be done at either end, but I found it easier from inside the car.

 

Note that the pipes run through some very small gaps under chassis cross-braces; this is why replacement with a hose-only solution isn't possible.

 

That's about it for removal!  I'll post some more photos if I can find them.  Also, replacement pipe/hose dimensions are critical, so I'll find those and let you know...

 

Keep us informed!


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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I saw and understood the curved pipe picture :thumbsup:  but short of pulling (thinner OD) rubber hose through the backbone while removing the old pipe, I doubt that a straight pipe could be re-installed unless something else was done to provide access?

 

 

 

Our chargecooler pipes were so rotted in front, that in the course of twisting the hoses to release them, the ENTIRE END twisted off both pipes!

 

Now, THAT was disappointing... :vava:

 

 

 

Luckily, Lotus put in longer-than-needed pipes so we cut off the jagged ends and reinstalled new hoses...but still, the best remedy would be to replace those pipes. :geek:  We just KNOW they don't have long for this world...


Atwell Haines

'88 Esprit

Succasunna, NJ USA

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If you want to replace like-with-like, then it's engine out.  The photo in post #25 shows the best insitu solution - rigid pipe at both ends for 2 reasons - 1) to mate to the hoses and 2) to allow the pipe to pass under the crossmembers inside the backbone.  Then flexible hose in the middle to permit folding into the backbone via the master gearchange aperture.  Worked a charm!

 

Dimensions are important as you need enough pipe at each end to clear the crossmembers, but not too much that you can't fold it into the aperture.  It's then a game of cat and mouse as you try and push the pipe through the chassis at either end!


British Ambassador to Florida, New York, Denmark and Newfoundland.  And Sweden.

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