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mikeeech

Reasons not to use hammerite on a chassis

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Those that have been following my restoration thread will remember that I brought an unfinished restoration which had had it;s body removed and the chassis painted in Hammerite. (dipped would actually be more acurate since the job is very bad with everything painted in situ and, where inconsiderate items like the diff prevented access, the area was just left!)

 

Since the car was an unfinished restoration then it has covered very few miles since the chassis was painted (the DVLC website confirms that the car has not had an MOT since the body was removed originally) and so I submit the photo's below for your delictation and as evidence as to the poor job that hamerite does in coating a chassis.  

post-16070-0-58242500-1396812219.jpg

 

post-16070-0-17347600-1396812222.jpg

 

post-16070-0-79623500-1396812224.jpg

 

post-16070-0-53960600-1396812227.jpg

 

post-16070-0-81542400-1396812229.jpg

 

post-16070-0-40247000-1396812232.jpg

 

My advice would be not to use this stuff. a temporary measure at best. what someone was thinking in going to the trouble of removing a body just to paint teh thing in this stuff defies belief. I'm now replacing my chassis with a hot zinc sprayed and powder coated replacement.

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How waxoyl and hammerite are still in business is a mystery. Unless you are still living in the 1970s surely you will realise that technology has moved on.

 

I think they rely on old duffers like my dad who still have their copies of Practical Motorist. Against my advice he travelled 100s of miles and spent £100s to get his car "professionally waxoiled", drove back in the rain and found it had all washed from the underside to the topside. Took him days to remove.


In the garage no-one can hear you scream 

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Not good, probably bad prep as well as hammershite paint. If you have to paint a chassis then Por 15 would be my choice. However if you have the chassis away from the body you may as well have it powder coated.

Edited by CharlieCroker

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I painted my new chassis using Hammerite. Preperation must be the answer as mine is still excellent after over 15 years (from memory). Just had to touch-up the odd chip, otherwise I'm well pleased with mine.

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Agreed, I think surface preparation is key, if you pardon the pun.

Most rust and traces of old paint, plus the use of a degreasing agent is vital.

If applying to smooth surfaces they will need to be abraded first.

Testimony to this is that a friend of mine uses Hammerite to protect the insides of the wheel arches on his rally car.

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Hammerite is not suitable for a chassis, it is to brittle and breaks with the flexing, you are better off with a good quality metal paint as it flexes.

For waxoyl I thin it down with white spirit and put it on hot as this allows it to creep into all the small areas. I et wash the chassis several times to remove all the rubbish and then allow it to air dry for at least a week before applying. I've done this on the defender with no problems.


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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Hammerite is not suitable for a chassis, it is to brittle and breaks with the flexing, you are better off with a good quality metal paint as it flexes.

For waxoyl I thin it down with white spirit and put it on hot as this allows it to creep into all the small areas. I et wash the chassis several times to remove all the rubbish and then allow it to air dry for at least a week before applying. I've done this on the defender with no problems.

Don't agree at all about your comment re Hammerite. See my post above. No traces at all of what you say happens. I would recommend it's use, properly applied. Fantastic stuff.

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Yeah, I think it's all down to prep. Waxoyl, for example is best applied from new before salt/grime can get on the underside.


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the 4x4 boys do not recommend hammerite at all.it cracks and lets water under it that causes the rust. but each to their own.


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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On my old spitfire I had the chassis blasted and hot zinc sprayed.  At the time they  were doing it they were also doing structures that would sit under the surface of the sea for years  so it was good enough for me. The little  bit I left unpainted was still clean 12 year later when I sold it.

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the 4x4 boys do not recommend hammerite at all.it cracks and lets water under it that causes the rust. but each to their own.

First used it on grasstrack  racing Mini Cooper S subframes back in '60's, used it ever since an all my cars. My Spyder Donington (Elite) chassis I did many many years ago, I've Never experienced craking. Do YOU have experience of Hammerite cracking yourself, or is it just hearsay?

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The chassis in the photo's was hamerited and had covered no miles. Whilst the chassis itself is still sound (I will give it to anyone who takes it! :thumbsup: ) there are areas where the hamerite has come off. 

 

This may be due to poor prep or cracking but I have gone down a hot zinc spray and powder coat for the replacement chassis since, if i'm going to the trouble of removing the chassis I want something that will last.

 

As MDW say's hot zinc spray and powdercoat lasts in the North sea. They don't hamerite oil rigs!

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Don't agree at all about your comment re Hammerite. See my post above. No traces at all of what you say happens. I would recommend it's use, properly applied. Fantastic stuff.

 Yes I have, as i say its up to you.


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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 Yes I have, as i say its up to you.

Fantastic stuff. I can thoroughly recommend it for chassis prep. Just posted because I think your original post is total BS and misleading.

Edited by Denis247

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I have to agree with those that have mentioned prep work.


Cheers, Gavin

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Fantastic stuff. I can thoroughly recommend it for chassis prep. Just posted because I think your original post is total BS and misleading.

I think that's a bit strong... what bit was BS and what bit was misleading?

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I've just done areas of mine with the stuff and although I can't guarantee it lasting I have to say it has gone done well due to my hard work in the prep. If you have traces of oil dirt or flakey rust remaing then I believe it will come off quickly. Depends on what you want, for me it will suffice as my chassis is in great condition with minimal rust, so just needed tidying. If you go to the trouble of a body off and have the time and money then zinc dip and powder coat is the way to go.

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Hey I have an old car, its so badly rusted I have panels welded over the rust which are now rusting, is there any 'stuff' that can be sprayed over a really bad case of rusted car that will stop it rusting etc.

 

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Do a Google search on the term "cold galvanisation" (or "cold galvanization") and you'll find lots of zinc-rich paints that can either be brushed or sprayed on. These will  give a better protection in the event that the paint layer is broken through, but if you already have rust then I'd suggest using a stabilising solution first (search term "Cure rust" to chemically alter the existing oxides.

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Zinga is supposed to be very good. I have also used flag rust converter leaves a satin black finish. 


Amateurs built the Ark

Professionals built the Titanic

"I haven't ridden in cars pulled by cows before" "Bullocks, Mr.Belcher" "No, I haven't, honestly"

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