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An idea for rusty petrol tanks (or not rusty infact!) - Page 3 - Esprit Chat - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
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An idea for rusty petrol tanks (or not rusty infact!)

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In 1994, I got my S3.  One month later,  the passenger side tank let go (ruined my drive - not sure what I was more upset about).  Strattons isolated that tank, and since then I have run on one tank.

 

I have a pair of steel replacement tanks that I have carted around with me since 1995 (I think they were the last ones from the factory) and every year I look at the car, and think, right, I'll get those tanks changed.  Every year for the last 20 years I have thought that, and every year I have bottled it.  Why?  Because I helped a mate do his in 1996 and frankly, it is one of the most hellish jobs ever, requiring Gollum style fingers and wrists, more dexterity than a ballet dancer and more patience than I  - or my mate - possess.

 

We took the engine out after 2 days of cussing and speculating [*].  Handy really, as we noticed that the water pump was leaking....:)   

 

You might get one done with the engine in-situ - but getting the other one done is like climbing Everest in flip-flops.  

 

//R

 

[*] We formulated this  - that the Esprit assembly instructions went along the lines of "first, take a heater core, and two petrol tanks...."

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They aren't available and would be heavy. I'd imagine a stainless fabrication company would end up making a couple of grand out of making them as bespoke products for you. 

 

What's your beef with ali tanks? You're trying to solve a problem with has already been solved. 

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Or you could explain what issues you've trying to get around with the current solution?

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I've bought most stuff from SJ Sports Cars - excellent online store, fast service. Wouldn't recommend too many of their pattern parts, but they do stock most genuine bits, while remanufacturing a lot of old stuff (i.e. wind deflectors etc etc)

 

Lotusbits are also pretty good.

Thanks for that info.

 

I really need to get hold of those reading light things in the middle behind the centre mirror - each time I hit a pothole or short speed hump the bloody lights turn on! :-)

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Remembering back to my school A levels in chemistry....

 

Aluminium DOES corrode but it's nothing to get worried about.  Aluminium corrodes on the metal surface but its actually a 'good' oxidisation.  Aluminium Oxide forms on aluminium and provides a good protection to the metal underneath.  Unlike Iron oxide (that nice red/brown rust that constantly tries to eat my Stag) Aluminum oxide only provides a layer - unlike Fe rust which grows and grows.  This makes aluminium a good choice for aeroplanes behind it's mass.

 

Well that's all from my school days but I don't think Aluminium behaviour has changed since then !

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http://www.acf-50.co.uk/

 

£15 a can. I've used it in the footwells of my Elise, like pretty much every other Elise S1 owner.

 

ACF-50, Anti-Corrosion Formula, is a state of the art, anti-corrosion/lubricant compound, that has been specifically designed for the Aero Space Industry. Itcan be described as an ultra thin fluid film compound which must be applied on an annual basis. ACF-50 actively penetrates through the corrosion deposits to the base of the cell where it emulsifies and encapsulates the electrolyte, lifting it away from the metal surface. ACF-50 then dispels this moisture and provides an atmospheric barrier which prevents any further moisture contact, thereby keeping the cell inactive. This compound continues to actively penetrate and "creep" into the tightest of seams, lap joints, micro cracks and around rivet heads, dissipating the moisture, even salt water, in these corrosion prone areas. These unique abilities of ACF-50 remain effective for 12 months, gradually disappearing as it is chemically consumed.

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Or you could explain what issues you've trying to get around with the current solution?

What's the point? Whatever I say you rubbish. It's getting tiresome.

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You asked a question, I gave you an answer. Just because you don't like it doesn't make it rubbish. 

 

I'll not apologise for having an opinion and experience of owning and working on Esprits plus the benefit of thousands of hours discussing every aspect of them for real and online with other owners plus some of the very people who designed and built the cars. What I'm saying and what 99.9% of Esprit owners will agree with is that there are ali tanks available, they're great and will more than likely outlast the car and pretty much anyone who has replaced their tanks has used ali and is happy, in fact it's seen as a huge positive on a car for sale. 

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I'm not complaining about you voicing your opinions Bibs, but it appears that whatever I material I suggested, you had already decided wasn't what is required: I on the other hand like to keep a rather more open mind, am receptive to alternative ideas, and I've found that researching all options has served me well for many years.

Galvanised tanks and stainless steel tanks - I've had experience with both in another life. You think they're a waste of time for the Esprit, but I don't, because there are pros and cons to both of them, but I've got better things to do than argue with you about them. It's a subject matter which I felt might have been interesting, though.

At the end of the day, you have your opinion, I have mine, and clearly we are never going to meet in the middle. Hence, I shall keep my counsel in future.

Oh, we're still coming to your BBQ, look forward to having a better discussion!

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Bibs - you have a certain way of delivering your message.  That's the problem with text - it takes out the human aspect out so the method of delivery becomes confused and crosswired in the readers mind.  There's a whole science behind it, like

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[Aluminium does corrode, Al2O3, however, remains on the surface and usually protects the remaining Al from further oxidation. Fe only continues to rust because the volume of the FeO is larger than the parent Fe and expands and flakes from the surface exposing more Fe which can then oxidise further. I'm sure everyone knows this.]

 

The problem with Al fuel tanks in cars may be that galvanic corrosion would need to be addressed and aluminium has a tendency to crack in an impact rather than deform as with a mild steel tank. Galvanic corrosion can occur REALLY fast, especially in the presence of salt. 

Taking into account the weight of the fuel, the weight saving of aluminium (which would need to be thicker than the steel equivalent) may be a moot point.

However they are available so there can't be too many problems with them.

Stainless would probably be the worst of both worlds.

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I was under the impression its FeO2 thats the nasty bugger with it's friendly brother FeO3 being ok and in fact harder than metal

 

(rust converters turn FeO2 to FeO3)

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I was a bit lax! Fe2O3 is the common form of rust. Basic principle stands though.

It's all on Wiki under Iron Oxide.

 

Personally I would not use a 'rust converter' on anything other than gardening equipment. But that's just me. I wouldn't have confidence that the structural integrity hasn't been lost.

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I was a bit lax! Fe2O3 is the common form of rust. Basic principle stands though.

It's all on Wiki under Iron Oxide.

 

Personally I would not use a 'rust converter' on anything other than gardening equipment. But that's just me. I wouldn't have confidence that the structural integrity hasn't been lost.

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That second link should have a warning before it - like "some of the images in this link may be upsetting for some viewers"...

I was a bit lax! Fe2O3

 

Last time I did chemistry was many decades ago!!

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