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Galvanising S1 Chassis

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I contacted Tony at Lotus Technical and his opinion was that an older chassis may well warp if hot-dipped. He's not sure why, just a gut feeling that it may do. They get all their current gal work out-sourced and they do, of course, gal all their subframes etc. currently.

He suggested that the gal company may have further info. or ideas to help prevent any warping.

 

I would like to gal my S1 chassis but it seems to be fraught with danger!

 

Anyone galvanised an old chassis! What was the outcome?

I'd be interested to hear, as ,I'm sure, would others.

 

Thanks,

Tom. 

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I know somebody who had his S2 chassis galvanized and it did warp it. He made a jig up and used large, long pieces of wood to pull it back again.

 

I had my S1 chassis sand blasted and then painted it with Frosts chassis black. I'm not a fan of powder coating personally and I like to be able to slap some more paint on it when it needs it.

 

Paul.

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You could electro zinc plate it. Not as rust resistant as hot dip gal but no heat and a lot finer. Could even paint over the top

 

. I used to get some parts for work hot dip galvanized and it was rough as fu... Bits and lumps all over the place. You can tell its more often used for gates and fences!

 

Buddsy 

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Powder coat is nothing to be scared of Paul!! So long as the chassis is properly prepared, personally I think it's head and shoulders above paint.

 

I would like to electro-plate then powder-coat, if I don't have the balls to galvanise. But it would have to be a mighty big bath.

I'll have to ring round. Avatech at Thetford have baths 2000mm x 480mm x 1200mm which is about a metre too short.

 

I suppose I could bolt it in a jig and then galvanise the whole lot. Seems a bit OTT though.

 

Thanks for the replies.

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Norfolk Zinc at Loddon seem to do some pretty big stuff and they done all the parts for your Esprit in the first place.

 

Buddsy 

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Like Paul, I've found powder to go brittle in relatively short order then flake off, esp on springs...

Albeit my S3 chassis is galvanised, I'm going to be trying epoxy mastic from this lot:

http://www.rust.co.uk/epoxy-mastic-rust-proofing-paint/c28117/

Along with their rust converter treatment, it performed extremely well in a recent practical classics long term test.

Dave

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Dave,

I think it's all down to the applicator. After all, powder-coat seems to stick pretty well to most domestic appliances and such-like.

Having said that, I did have one experience with a gloss powder-coat that lifted off a very thick cast steel part. Mainly because it was applied too thickly, but also because it obviously hadn't adhered properly which may be due to it not reaching the required temp for long enough.

A kit-car chassis I owned years ago was powder-coated in satin black and was never going to come off, so again, I think the firm doing the work make a big difference.

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I do know that Lotus had to check all the chassis again on the jig after galvanising and reset if necessary. 

 

Also some of them they didnt reset very well which is why many cars came out with bad alignment. 

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Have you heard of these guys: http://www.before-n-after.co.uk/

 

They're a Land Rover rustproofing place and use a system of coating called Kleentect to prevent rust on the LR chassis although it is only suitable for a new rust-free chassis.

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My mechanic said it would be near impossible to warp an S2 chassis because it's all box section.

Anyone know which part of the chassis might be prone to warping?

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I would worry about your mechanic!

 

Only the backbone and front cross member are box section. They did warp when galvanised, 100% definitely, it was a big problem for the factory at the time.

 

True that the S2 was not galvanised but its not sufficiently different to the S3 to be any relevance.

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Lots of good advice.

I'm going to go for zinc spray. It seems like the best choice for an early chassis and there are a couple of places locally. Powder-coat over the top of that.

I'll post some pics when it's done.

Thanks to all who responded.


P.S. I think it's the box section that IS the issue. I can't see the 14 gauge tube warping, but welded flat sheet would definitely be prone, IMHO,

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How about electrophoretic painting? It would treat all the hidden areas and whilst not as good as hot dip galvanising you wouldn't have the warping concerns. There are firms who can treat an entire car monocoque so an Esprit chassis wouldn't be an issue size-wise.

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My chassis and all suspension parts were grit blasted and then covered with POR-15 paint - applied exactly as per the instructions - two coats then top coated with a chassis black. Hard as nails, it simply doesn't chip or scratch off. The internal sections were then Dinitrol cavity wax sprayed for protection. 

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Have you heard of these guys: http://www.before-n-after.co.uk/

 

They're a Land Rover rustproofing place and use a system of coating called Kleentect to prevent rust on the LR chassis although it is only suitable for a new rust-free chassis.

And if you read any Land Rover forum, the results are far from impressive.

You would be far better off just doing it yourself with Dinitrol.

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My chassis and all suspension parts were grit blasted and then covered with POR-15 paint - applied exactly as per the instructions - two coats then top coated with a chassis black. Hard as nails, it simply doesn't chip or scratch off. The internal sections were then Dinitrol cavity wax sprayed for protection.

I like this Jon, I've seen a couple of classic cars chassis done and they look wonderful. I'll do this too I think.

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Missed this thread.

But what is the issue , Galv is not a problem if done correctly by professionals.

Some distortion can appear but is mainly caused by the method of suspension and

how the unit is pre-heated and dipped...

All chassis should be jig checked before and after with tweaking where required, this 

should not be an issue and all the scare stories are mostly unfounded.

Be prepared to pay in the region of £1k for full process including pre and post prep  work.

When done correct its the most secure anti rust method there is.

 

post-10519-0-39141900-1413097326.jpg

 

post-10519-0-62961700-1413097380.jpg

 

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Hi David,

I entirely agree with what you are saying. However, my main worries are:

How can I /do I check it on a jig? Where will I find a jig?

How do I straighten it once it has been twisted or bowed?

 

I'm very open to advice on this one.

Thanks,

Tom.

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Hi Tom,

You will first need to find a local specialist with a suitable jig, that can adapt to

chassis alignment , not all can..

Take the bare chassis along with the measurement alignment sheet to get a before

set of figures. You may find some errors as it is, but don't concern yourself at this stage.

Mount or hang the chassis for galve with this knowledge so any distortion will aid the 

alignment. If unsure on this talk to the galve company and if they are any good they will

advise accordingly. If they can not avoid them...

The galve company should pre-heat the chassis and dip in away to avoid distortion. once

completed return to the jig and recheck the figures. Any out of spec measurements can

then be reset. The tolerances are quite wide so not usually an issue.. Although it is an

opportunity to set the chassis spot on whilst on the jig..

When this is all done you will need to re-tap all the threaded sections also drill and ream

all other mounting points.  

If you still have any questions PM me and i will give you my mobile no. I can then talk you

though it..

Failing that you contract the whole job out to a specialist..but this may be more expensive. 

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I have the same problem. I'd love to do this as part of my current restoration but am struggling to find anyone local (Sydney, Australia) with the expertise to do everything outlined above.

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David,

That's very generous of you. Very comprehensive advice.

I'll have a think and let you know.

I'll see if I can find a specialist in my area. I would really like to do a gal job.

Thanks again.

Tom.

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