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Rebuilding my Sport 160

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Thought I might share something I started on 'that other forum' some time ago. Recently started work on this again and thought it might be of interest, so to help you catch up, this is my 160 rebuild blog..

 

You can follow this on Facebook too.. https://www.facebook.com/AnalogueAutomotive

 

Part 1

S1 Sport 160 Chassis no. 603 was one of the first SVA Sport 160's, number 3 in fact.

It came direct from the factory to Quaife and was fitted with one of their straight cut, ultra close ratio sequential gear boxes. Around the same time (although I have never got the exact story of why or by who) it was fitted with a Vulcan head and throttle bodies apparently from PTP giving it 180/190Bhp.

I first bought the car from a gent who worked at Quaife, at that time it had a mere 13K on the clock and had not really been used for a while. I had dreams of blatting though the gears like a rally driver but sadly the box was a bit slow and on my first outing at Brands it proved that as well as spraying gearbox fluid & CV grease everywhere, it wasn't all it was cracked up to be.

So my first job was to replace the sequential box with exactly the same Quaife straight cut, ultra close ratio box but with a standard shifter.....same great noise as long as you don't mind going prematurely deaf.

I sold it shortly after this as I had another S1 that I was using and enjoying, and as my wife hadn't yet found out I had two Elise's, I thought it was best to quit while I was ahead.

The picture is her at Dunsfold, just after it was wrapped in satin black and just before I sold it.

 

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Part 2

 

And you thought me selling it was the end of the story? Well no, thankfully I was lucky enough to be in a position to buy it back not long after parting with her..

 

First job was to remove the satin black vinyl wrap. When we applied it the body work was in pretty good condition, there was a little crack in the front clam on the arch and small piece of heat damage to the rear, both of which were still there and hadn't repaired themselves!!

 

Removing the wrap was easier said than done, it had been on there about three years and lasted well. But once heated up to peel off it came away in the tiniest pieces!! This one half side took me three hours.. it was at this point I got the lad from the local MOT place who wanted some Saturday work to carry on the job, best £100 I ever paid someone

 

Once finished and polished up she looked very presentable, as you can see from the images.

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Part 3

 

Job number one was setting up a corner of the workshop to strip down and organise myself for the rebuild.

The area I've set up to work from has good long bench so all the parts can be laid out and sorted/cleaned/replaced.

Then I started on body removal.

For that I sourced some stands that my body shop use to support the clams rather than have them knocking about and possibly getting damaged.

Next - stripping down for the big clean!

 

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Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

The matt black looks awful, really doesn't suit the car at all... much nicer without :)

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Part 4

 

So, we've cleaned up the chassis, here's some before and after shots!

 

Process was simple, start with the vacuum (with brush attachment) to get all the loose stuff out, then spray on brake cleaner with a rag and use an old tooth brush to get into any corners (top tip - this is very good on S1 step plates)

 

Follow it up with a magic sponge with water to finish, you'd be surprised, even if it looks clean the sponge manages to lift more off.

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That does look jolly clean, nice one Steffen :)

Edited by Simon350S

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I really should do that to mine. I got about 100kgs of those magic sponges off ebay for pennies, they're very useful! 

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Part 5

 

So, we've cleaned up the chassis, here's some before and after shots!

 

Process was simple, start with the vacuum (with brush attachment) to get all the loose stuff out, then spray on brake cleaner with a rag and use an old tooth brush to get into any corners (top tip - this is very good on S1 step plates)

 

Follow it up with a magic sponge with water to finish, you'd be surprised, even if it looks clean the sponge manages to lift more off.

 


Part 6

 

We've now progressed to the rear of car and begun the strip down and removal of the engine, gearbox and rear subframe.

 

I'd already taken the head off and will come back to that, plus the Titan throttle bodies are now off and stripped down.

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Part 7

 

More progress on the rear end, heat shield to fire wall was way past its best, burnt in some areas and falling to bits in others. Decided to remove it and replace with something more blingy

Removing was a pig of a job, slow going as it was falling apart in tiny pieces, once it was all off then just the even more boring job of removing residual glue.post-15603-0-12175300-1418662108.jpgpost-15603-0-51115500-1418662108.jpgpost-15603-0-24833400-1418662109.jpgpost-15603-0-77654300-1418662109.jpg

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Part 8

 

So, last time we were very busy cleaning up the rear end, in particular the heat shield area.

While we did that we cleaned rear chassis legs, they came up really well considering they were really caked in muck.

 

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Progress slowed a little as the workshop has been busy.

But we did have the chance to resolve some corrosion issues found by removing the heat shielding in the engine bay.

The lower part of the chassis to the rear of fuel tank can corrode as water can ingress behind the heat shielding matt and slowly eat away at the alloy.

Same issue as floor corrosion in the cabin but in an impossible area to get at unless the engine is out.

My heat shielding was pretty rotten and falling apart so that all came off, the corrosion is limited to a few small patches so not too bad.

The essential element to treating this is to neutralise the reaction, once that is done (I use a process recommended and used in the marine industry) you can start to make it look better cosmetically and protect it from future issues.

 

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So it's not just a case of spraying ACF50 on the corrosion?

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Part 9

 

I'm using some filler, high build primer and top coat to seal the area and allow for a smooth finish. I may well use thin gold reflective heat shielding so getting it smooth now will give that a better result.

 

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Filled and primed the firewall as I won’t be using the original brackets and again want smooth finish for new shielding.

 

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Part 10

 

Decided to sort out the heating elements, so all heater boxes and vents have come out and have either been modified or replaced.

 

Lots of shiny stuff should be on its way back for being powder coated so not far off starting to parts back on.

 

Best way to clean is using brake cleaner with an MF cloth or scotch-brite depending on how bad the dirt levels are, then water and the famous magic sponge to finish. You'll need to take your time but those sponges are full of magic.

 

Here's a sample of how clean you can get the chassis using this process, comes up pretty good, does take time but I think its worth the effort.

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Always enjoy threads like this, nice work!

 

I guess I should google magic sponge, feels like I'm missing out on something :-)

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You can buy it in supermarkets for about £4-5 a sponge or get a ton of it on ebay for around 1/50th the price! I've still got some I bought from there about 5 years ago! Comes in bigger blocks you cut to size with a stanley knife.

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