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Those of a nervous disposition may want to look away now.

 

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I have several jobs to do, clutch, fuel tanks, and exhaust manifold, so decided it was time to bite the bullet.

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Question for the technically-minded:-

 

Is it feasible to remove the charcoal canister, and the associated pipework, and if so, how do I do it?

 

It looks incredibly complicated and as the can is 20 years old, I'd question whether it functions as intended.

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Look forward to seeing this progress Ian, well done.

 

Trevor.

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So far;

 

  • The exhaust pipe/turbo studs very badly rusted, and have all sheared (new ones required but maybe a turbo recon? Not sure.)
  • The O2 sensor has apparently welded itself into the exhaust pipe (haven't sheared that off as yet).
  • One of the threaded fittings on the back of the Sanden air-con compressor has sheared which will mean a recon at least (where the hell is that going to come from?).
  • The coolant tank is split (NLA from Peugeot new one off eBay in the post.)

 

Onwards we go..............

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  • Exhaust system removed.
  • Catalytic converter completely devoid of any guts whatsoever (yes, really).
  • Very sooty inside exhaust, engine definitely running too rich.
  • Much talking about "How on earth are we going to get to..........(insert inaccessible Esprit part of your choice here)".
  • Throttle cable disconnected. Eventually.
  • Much standing/laying around pointing at various items.
  • Much discussion about whether to simply unbolt the power steering pump.
  • Much discussion about then procedure for draining of fuel tanks without getting covered in petrol.
  • Retired indoors for beer(s) to discuss general lack of progress.

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You're less than 3 hours from pulling it! See what happens when you play a guitar?

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Question for the technically-minded:-

 

Is it feasible to remove the charcoal canister, and the associated pipework, and if so, how do I do it?

 

It looks incredibly complicated and as the can is 20 years old, I'd question whether it functions as intended.

 

Not a good idea to remove it, unless you either like your car and garage smelling like gasoline, or running problems.

 

The charcoal canister is part of the system that allows the fuel tanks to pressurize, and prevents them from reaching too high of a pressure and blowing seals.  The charcoal canister also helps prevent the fuel vapor from escaping and causing the car to smell like fuel.  The fuel system needs a pressurized tank to deliver enough fuel to the car at full boost.

 

You can buy a replacement charcoal canister pretty cheaply.  They do not last forever.

 

It's actually a simple system, just a few hoses, a roll over valve, a one way check valve and the PWM driven solenoid at the canister.

 

Here's the part number for a replacement canister

IMG_3383.JPG

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Much obliged, Travis. As it's manufactured by Rochester, I assume that's a US part, so will have to look around for it here.

 

Edit; no luck so far on the web. Any idea what other car it might be fitted to?

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The O2 sensors are indestructible! I actually got my "welded" one out with a torque wrench and a piece of pipe to gain a few meters of leverage - it came out without the threads getting busted up. Although you might as well get a new one and associated cat (if you're worried about passing the MOT). I can vouch for the SJ Sportscars cat/Stainless backbox combo. Passes MOT in Sweden (after a warmup run) and does wonders for response and sound.

 

Keep us updated. I have to do this with the SE the coming spring and have never attempted lifting an engine before...

 

Where are you doing all this btw in a garage or the yard?

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I shall have another go at the O2 sensor removal, as I think I will have to replace the turbo/cat pipe anyway. I've nothing to lose. The car passed an MOT in July without a cat, so I'm wondering if it's required, really. Might just go de-cat pipe, and have done with it. Maybe some others here have comments to make about that?

 

I'm doing this in the garage (double), I have an electric overhead winch, and I have a scissor lift I bought from Trevor. I wouldn't have attempted the job without them. I can raise the car up by almost a metre, which is sufficient.

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Scissor lift looks amazing! I was considering something similar for my garage as I have full 2.4m height so could easily lift the Esprit a metre or so, which would be enough for most jobs.

What make is yours? Is it low enough to drive the Esprit straight over or do you need to gain any extra clearance?

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Not sure about the make Neil, but this is as close as I can find - http://www.bhrepairs.co.uk/

 

It has rectangular swinging arms, three different pad sets are supplied for different height cars/vans. This particular scissor pattern is the best for access underneath the Esprit, there are others, but this one gives maximum access, and rises pretty much vertically. It doesn't push the car forwards or backwards. It will lift to about 1,250mm but I'm restricted to about 900mm in my garage. It's still OK for me, though.

 

It's VERY heavy, I mean once it's in situ, you won't be wanting to move it too much!

 

The Esprit does just fit over it, but there is not enough clearance under it to use even the lowest pads supplied, and in any case they're too wide and would crush some of the GRP. I made small hardwood blocks with a hard rubber pads which fit into the recesses where the jacking points would have been, which work fine.

 

I think that with two people and full fuel onboard, it might scrape on the lift, however I am led to believe that most simply use a couple of old scaffold boards to park the car on, which of course doesn't alter the height to which it can be raised, then there's no problem at all. I don't bother at the moment because it's not necessary in my case.

 

Arguably one of the best things I've ever bought.

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Thanks Ian. I think one of these is now on my Christmas list for next year...

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Looking at my tapered turbo pipe, it probably wants renewing, too. I've read the thread on this subject, and I agree that a smooth internal wall is best for airflow. But I am not yet minded to buy that section when the remainder still uses convoluted pipe, and routing about as straight as a politician.

I shall endeavour to see if I can find a better solution: I may not, but I will certainly try whilst the engine/gearbox job is going on.

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As the car was running rich when I bought it, which was borne out by the soot in the exhaust pipe, I checked the 02 sensor. Unless my eyesight deceives me it's a Bosch sensor, P/N 0 258 003 548. My research suggests it might not be the correct one:-

http://www.findpart.org/part/bos-0258003548/

http://www.lambdasensor.com/main/bosch/price.pl?item=0258003548

Any thoughts, anyone?

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The "correct" sensor changed over the years - I borrowed a genuine one a year ago from a friend and it differed from what is now offered as authentic. Travis has been successful with a Bosch 13030 I believe (and even those differed among themselves) but I was unable to source the same thing in Europe. All I know is trying to save a penny finding a suitable replacement can just result in a pain in the arse and an undriveable car. You might be more adept at this stuff than I am though so you might have luck sourcing a functioning alternative.

 

Anyhow what I have is a Delphi original part (A918E0322F) a.k.a. ES 10057. Putting it it my car made it work right.

 

Having said that, how did you know it was running "rich"? You had a gutted cat which would give the exhaust a very rich smell regardless, but every Esprit I've seen has a sooty exhaust after a few runs. I've switched out 2 exhausts in the last year (don't ask) and they got sooty after a while too. As far as I know my car runs correctly (also have the CO/HC/NOx readouts for it from earlier this year to prove it..)

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Well, I guess as I seem to have established that the sensor is not the correct one, it doesn't really matter. When I was trying to get Espritmon working, I did see an air/fuel ratio of about 12-1, on idle, which would seem to indicate a rich mixture, and it smelt rich. The amount of soot inside the exhaust, and on the plugs also led me down that path.

 

Whatever, I won't know until it's all back together again, but I will almost certainly buy a new Lotus sensor, as I don't want any problems in that department.

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The Air Fuel ratio in Espritmon and Freescan are ECU desired air fuel ratio. That is not a measured ratio.

The prougramming in the ECU does definitely shoot for a rich mixture.

Once warm, the ECU will go for a 14.6:1 ratio at idle.

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I shall endeavour to run an Espritmon check once it's back running again.

Don't wait by the phone..........!

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Update on the progress:-

 

The engine/box is ready to be lifted.

 

Problems I encountered so far:-

 

Power steering pump - I gave up on trying to get to the hydraulic pipes, and also on the idea of removing the mounting bracket from the block, in favour of unbolting the pump from its bracket. I had thought of removing the exhaust manifold to get to it, as all the nuts/studs are in place and in good nick, but thought I'd have one last push first. It took me all afternoon to get the last caphead bolt out, but the engine should lift clear of the pump.

 

Engine mounting bolts - The driver's side was a piece of cake to do. Mind you, it had been subjected to a diet of engine oil from the filter sandwich plate, so I'm not sure if that helped. The passenger side, being far more difficult to access, was of course a different story. I ended up drilling the nut, then chiseling and splitting it. Assuming the bolt is the original Lotus item, it cannot be pulled out of the mount, as it hits the underside of the exhaust manifold.

 

Rusted bolts - on the rear access panel behind the gearbox. An hour with a dremel finally got them out.

 

Seized rivnuts - on the charcoal canister bracket, and the passenger side GRP panel where the power steering pipes come through. They'll be done when the engine is out.

 

Driveshafts - Not as much of a problem as I originally thought, due to advice from Sparky. Removed the top adjustable link bolt from the ally wheel hub, and the inboard lower arm bolt at the gearbox end. Then removed the clips from the inboard rubber boots and drained the oil. Marked the positions on the driveshaft and gearbox, then there was enough compliance in the suspension for me to pull the hub outboard, and separate the spider from the yoke. I then bagged the spider and yoke in plastic bags, and used coat hanger wire to hang the inboard ends up out of the way.

 

Translator - Knackered. Completely. How I managed to select any gears is beyond me. Rebuild required.

 

Air-con pump - I got a new one, along with a filter/dryer. I'll see if I can repair the original pump at some point. It's still on the engine, but the pipes are off. I need to soak one in caustic to remove the remains of the alloy connection.

 

Fuel tanks - I drained the driver's side tank below the crossover pipe, and assumed I could then disconnect the rubber hose. I then got covered in fuel, and wonder if the other tank has blocked breathers. To be done when the engine is out.

 

 

 

Finally, what jobs would be sensible to do while the engine and box are out? I think the water pump might be a good one, but what else? Valve clearances? Re-seal the exhaust cam tower?

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Install an electric chargecooler when putting things back together is a great idea, if not already done.

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That had already been done, although it's position on top of the engine was not the best for maintaining suction. I shall have to see where else I can relocate it to.

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Under the cross member is a popular location, nice and low so it's easy to prime too :)

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