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Evora clutch change poll...


Has your Evora had a new clutch (based on wear or age related failure)  

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As mentioned recently in another thread, the position of the bite point is only relevant on cable operated clutches, it's no indicator of wear on a hydraulically operated clutch as fitted to the Evora. Cables clutches would adjust on a ratchet as the clutch wore, fluid filled ones I imagine just use more fluid from the reservoir.

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

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Yes, 2010 NA with 43k Came out and looked like this  Initially pretty peeved that it needed doing but specialist (Craig Moncreiff Cars) said it was the heaviest clutch they'd seen on a

Surely the 'weight' of the clutch is dependant upon the hydraulics (bore, stroke, volume etc) so maybe a new master or slave cylinder can make a heavy clutch lighter? Either the master or slave c

No, 2010 N/A with 122K km.

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The clutch on my Saab daily was very high and I was told the same when I asked ......I bought the car at 10k miles.....I never changed the clutch and 4 years later on and at 110k miles the bit point is still very high.....but it's never changed.....its just where it is......nothing wrong with it.......

I'd say there's nothing wrong with your clutch.....its just got a high bite point.....

 

The Faster You Drive...The Slower You Age

(Albert Einstein  14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955)

 

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Believe me, I don't want the clutch changing if it's not necessary.

If the high bite point is not wear related, is it adjustable?  I've never encountered one this high in any Elise - also hydraulically operated.

This would only leave me with the heavy clutch - it is significantly heavier than the other Evoras I've sat in, and FAR heavier than an Elise.  It sometimes irritates an old knee injury on longer journeys - never had that with any other car.

(Just to be clear, it was the clutch weight that the dealer said couldn't be improved unless I changed the clutch)

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The question was have you had a clutch plate change or not! Quite simple I thought, but then we seem to have mission creep and we now have a moving thread as to where a clutch should or shouldn't bite. I thought that Bibs was on to a simple outcome that might have put to rest some concerns about clutch plate life but there seems to be more abstract thinkers on here than SELOC!

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1 hour ago, Don262 said:

The question was have you had a clutch plate change or not! Quite simple I thought, but then we seem to have mission creep and we now have a moving thread as to where a clutch should or shouldn't bite. I thought that Bibs was on to a simple outcome that might have put to rest some concerns about clutch plate life but there seems to be more abstract thinkers on here than SELOC!

 

1) Dealer investigates problem with (heavy) clutch, and reports it cannot be remedied without changing clutch.

2) Secondary issue of high bite point seems (in my mind) to add weight to benefit of replacing

3) After trying to gather more information about what is normal for an Evora clutch (through forum and also trying another Evora), I get a quote from dealer for replacement.

4) Dealer awaiting callback to confirm that I want to go ahead, but due to price I feel it sensible to get a couple of other quotes.

I thought that this fell under the category of 'replacement due to age related failure'.

A couple of other forum members have offered HELPFUL advice that indicated point 2 is incorrect, which at least makes me feel like I should have another conversation with the dealer.

 

Your comment - not so helpful.  Downright facetious in my opinion.

 

Bibs, if you feel like my contribution to this thread is not appropriate, please feel free to delete it.

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Its threads like this that bring out helpful information especially if you're in the course of making a decision. 

They are indeed self adjusting, so a high bite point is not a sign of wear. However I have heard before that a very heavy clutch can only be remedied by opening it up and therefore changing the clutch while you are there. 

My vx has always had a slightly higher bite point than others, and has done 45k miles like it (half of which with nearly a 100hp more than it was designed with). 

 

 

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Surely the 'weight' of the clutch is dependant upon the hydraulics (bore, stroke, volume etc) so maybe a new master or slave cylinder can make a heavy clutch lighter?

Either the master or slave cylinder could be faulty and I would say that changing both master and slave cylinders should be tried before resorting to a plate change?

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Mike S

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1 hour ago, JG220 said:

Apart from they are in the bell housing so its the same job, engine out etc. 

 

Really? Both of them? I can see that the slave might be in there but surely not the master?

Mike S

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I thought the slave cylinder sat on top of the bell housing not inside, and the master cylinder was above/in front of the pedal box.

Ok nigelh I'm into the spirit of things now, didn't mean to T you off.

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^ That.

http://vsic.lotuscars.com/system/files/documents/sn_qj_clutch_evora.pdf

Quote

The hydraulic clutch release mechanism uses a master cylinder fixed to the pedal box and operated by the clutch pedal, and a slave cylinder bolted to the left hand side of the clutch housing

 

 

88 Esprit NA, 89 Esprit Turbo SE, Evora, Evora S, Evora IPS, Evora S IPS, Evora S IPS SR, Evora 400, Elise S1, Elise S1 111s, Evora GT410 Sport

Evora NA

For forum issues, please contact the Moderators. I will aim to respond to emails/PM's Mon-Fri 9-6 GMT. 

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You beat me to it Don! Edit: and Bibs as well :thumbup: .The master cylinder is attached to the pedal box and the slave cylinder is mounted externally on the bell housing.

Just read Section QJ of the Service Notes and it confirms that accessing the master cylinder is a front clam off job and to get to the slave cylinder the rear undertray has to be removed.

Interestingly the metal and plastic clutch master cylinders are not interchangeable according to the Service Notes.

 

Clutch Master.JPG

Clutch Slave.JPG

Edited by EuropaSman
My built in spell checker doesn't work!

Lover of everything Lotus Cars and proud owner of production Evora No.75 (2nd UK customer specced car by VIN). Originally from the Far East....of Anglia, I read black box data for a living so that could explain a lot!

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Thanks for all the constructive comments, and apologies - it was never my intention to turn this thread into a discussion about my clutch.

Similarly I don't think it would be fair to give a running commentary on my discussions with the dealer.  I haven't even spoken to them about the high bite point, which is certainly a failing on my part and I thank the forum contributors for correcting my bad assumption about this. 

At some point I will update my original 'clutch weight' thread in case it is helpful to someone else.

Edited by nigelh
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No. 34K miles and the last fifteen thousand of which has been mostly commuting with a high degree of stop/start traffic.  

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Yes, 2010 NA with 43k

Came out and looked like this 

IMG-20160223-WA0005_zpsualgzuch.jpg

Initially pretty peeved that it needed doing but specialist (Craig Moncreiff Cars) said it was the heaviest clutch they'd seen on an evora and it was significantly heavier than when they'd seen it 6 months before.  No slip but the recommendation was change it before it goes, enjoy the car more. 

Cost was about £1.9k including a belt change (PITA engine in, 2 mins engine out) and the car is transformed.    Clutch is much lighter, really noticeable on the downshift and the car is just far more enjoyable.  43k seems low but the way I'm looking at it is that i've got another 7 years at current mileage before it needs doing again........that's much better for the man maths.  

Overall I'm glad i changed it and i don't grudge the money.  If anyone wants a shot and is anywhere near Glasgow (or Knockhill at the right trackday) they are welcome to try and see if there is a difference.   

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No - 2010 N/A on 45k miles.

I'm informed by the previous owner Gavin (21gg) that it did have a new clutch at 24k miles but it was not wear or failure related. It was discovered that although the factory spec said it had a CR box, it actually had a standard box fitted. When they were changing the box, it made sense to pop in a new clutch at the same time. I've put 13k on it this past year, with a fair bit of commuting and a couple of 'on track 'sessions, and it's survived thus far.

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