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hepkat63

Engine removal - how to

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Hi All,

figure it is about time to take out my engine.  I thought it best to ask some people whom have done it before the best way - and any tips/tricks.   So, can anyone on here that has done an engine removal on the 1982 Turbo Esprit make some comments or point me towards a link with some photos of an engine removal please?   I believe that the engine/trans comes out at the same time.   I can't use an overhead gantry crane - would have to use a mobile engine hoist - but I believe the 'lift ' on these might have to be checked as there is not enough travel to pull both out?

thank you in advance.

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Need a long reach hoist to clear the transom and make sure you can get enough height. (I prefer to work outside)  Lift engine & box together,    Gearbox end needs to gradually be angled down as you lift - upto maybe 30 degrees.   Apart from that, no tips or tricks, just a matter of undoing everything & lifting.    Make it easier by doing in stages.   Stage1 remove all bodywork, Stage2 disconnect all ancillaries, Stage3 lift 

Perfectly do-able singlehanded

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Just the boot floor bits inside the boot. If you take the boot struts off - you can lift the almost vertical and just secure in that position

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I have often wondered if that was possible to do without sounds of splitting fiberglass! Useful to know.

When I took mine out years ago I didnt take out the engine bay surround first but halfway through the process I wished that I had. 

I do wonder though if next time I might remove the gearbox first. then the engine would be far easier to lift on its own as it would not need any tilting. Anyone done it this way?

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Done it both ways; together is best.  To make it really easy you can use a balance bar with the hoist.  I often tie off the deck in a vertical position.  Just make sure you tie it in both directions, like a mast.

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You guys must have more ceiling height than me!   I also remove the rear valance to get the silencer out of the way.   May also still have the engine tray if its original

Edited by 910Esprit

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On 20/08/2016 at 09:31, hepkat63 said:

Hi All,

figure it is about time to take out my engine.  I thought it best to ask some people whom have done it before the best way - and any tips/tricks.   So, can anyone on here that has done an engine removal on the 1982 Turbo Esprit make some comments or point me towards a link with some photos of an engine removal please?   I believe that the engine/trans comes out at the same time.   I can't use an overhead gantry crane - would have to use a mobile engine hoist - but I believe the 'lift ' on these might have to be checked as there is not enough travel to pull both out?

thank you in advance.

I had some work done on my S1 at SJ Sportscars and I had head leaking issues. I spoke to Steve about pulling the engine and he said he couldn't remember the last time they pulled an engine, they do everything in situ. So I did the head gasket on mine in situ and it wasn't particularly difficult, just time consuming. I've changed the water pump 3 times in situ and a timing belt would be easy enough in situ.

What are you planning on doing?

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Me too; I won't pull an engine unless absolutely necessary.  My ceiling height tends to be around 93000000 miles.

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hmm, well that is interesting.  Maybe I don't need to take the motor out?  I am getting conflicting information (reading too much on the internet I think !).   So, perhaps I should explain a little further.   I bought the car last December and since then, I haven't driven it very much. I have restored the wheels, done most of the interior and installed and overhead console.  I have bought 'big brakes' for the front, new shockers for the front and new rear brakes.  I have yet to fit the brakes - going to do those all at once.    I also am going to paint it - and have bought the paint and a portable (blow up) spray booth - but that's another story.    I checked the oil  a few months ago and it had that white frothy stuff on the dipstick.  I immediately thought I had a blown head gasket.   I noted that the car does run a little hot - about 3/4 way on the temp gauge.  I asked the previous owner about it - and he said it was fine and never overheated or leaked water.  I checked all this and can't find any leaks either.   I decided to dump the oil and check.  There was no water in the oil - so I put it down to condensation.   I have since replaced the oil and oil filter - taken the car for a few 1/2 hour drives and it seems ok.  Temp is still (i think) a little high.

I then started to think about the timing belt and from what I have heard, you should change it each year.   So, I thought it might be prudent to pull the motor, check the head gasket, do the timing belt and anything else that I can find whilst it was out.

No, i really don't want to pull the motor as it is coming up spring here in Australia and would rather take it for a few more drives.  I suppose i could do a compression test on the motor and from what I have read - change the timing belt whilst in the car.  Does the timing belt really need changing each year?  I was told that it does - but then told that as I am in Australia , the weather is kinder and probably more like every three years.   I have put about 500km on the car in nine months - so not much.

If I do pull the motor - it will have to be with a hoist, as I don't have anything 'overhead' to use to attach an overhead lifter on.

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I have absolutely no intention of changing my S1 timing belt every year! I've heard every two years but I also know of people running S1s for seven years before changing them. From what I've read the problem is that the angle of lap (i.e. how much the belt actually contacts the pulleys) is small, which places more stress on the belt. Hence the need to change it regularly. I'll probably do mine every three years or so.

If I ever have to pull the engine I'll drop it out the bottom, rather than pull it out the top.

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12 hours ago, Sparky said:

//I often tie off the deck in a vertical position.  Just make sure you tie it in both directions, like a mast.

The dealership I used to play cars in had some pieces of "L" shaped and welded dexion which mounted onto the balljoints of the removed tailgate struts. They held the tailgate into a rigid upright position. 

Bish bosh! :thumbup: 

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Recommend timing belt intervals I'm pretty sure are 2 years /20,000 miles whichever comes soonest, but I expect most of us would push it to 3 years some even more, (but personally I'd stick to 3). It's a tricky job, but normally done with the engine in sit from underneath mainly, so best done on a lift.

Enjoy your car this summer and save this job until the winter. 

However if you do decide to pull the motor, you'll have the chance to tidy and clean everything in there, but expect to find a multitude of other problem, so go fourth with an open mind and wallet, ask Barry Kearley, he knows!

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If the engine and box are out, then beware: You'll find all manner of other bits and bobs that you'll want to replace that are so incredibly easy to get to once they're out, that you'll be doing them as a matter of course. Budget accordingly!

How're the fuel tanks?

 

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11 hours ago, Barrykearley said:

It's different on the v8 

Sorry Barry it's 2 years 24,000 miles, but to be fair I was carefull to cover my ass by saying "I'm pretty sure". Anyway whats a few thousand miles between friends!

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It needs to be checked at an interval and changed at a different interval.... I'd need to look in the book - are the blue gates any longer in life span ?? 

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I seem to remember Lotus tested a blue one for 100,000 miles with no issues and no measurable stretch.

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That sounds about right Andy,  Probably plenty of extra miles in them than they say, but belt life given is safe mileage zone,   I hear Barry Kearly is doing it next but going for 100,001 miles just so he can strip his engine again :P

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As has been pointed out, a timing belt does not require the engine out.  Once you have done one and understand the process, its not difficult.  Access is not as bad as you may imagine..

Do you know when the rad was last changed?   I got an extra +5 degrees of cooling with a new one, even though the old one looked OK. 

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2 hours ago, Barrykearley said:

- are the blue gates any longer in life span ?? 

I've recently had the blue Gates ones fitted on my V8, I was told 4 years for these,  but obviously checked for tension every year.

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not sure when the radiator was last done - but will check.  Question from this - how does one check the timing belt - apart from the obvious signs of wear?  Is there a gauge available for this job?  On my old 911 porsche , you could buy a gauge to test the tension of their belts.

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There is a proper gauge available, this is mine, but many people get away without one, by adjusting so that the belt can just about be twisted 90 degrees with finger and thumb on the long run.

DSCN3190.JPG

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thanks Andy - where did you get that from if you don't mind me asking?  Also, what is the proper tension you work for with this?

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The tension is 90 as I recall. I bought that in 1984 and the place I got it from in South London has long since gone unfortunately. Similar gauges do come up on Ebay, mainly in the USA, but there are many different types, it has to be the right one for the belt width and tooth size.

This is all in the Service Notes which is a pretty essential document to have and is very comprehensive.

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