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Esprit Turbo project car - part3 - the further continuation - Page 176 - Esprit 'Project & Restoration' Room - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
Lotusfab

Esprit Turbo project car - part3 - the further continuation

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Thanks for looking it up. It's just a pink wire, the same Colour as the resistive wire. It exits the loom on the fuel pump connection. I can't see any possible use for it. The pump only requires the other positive and negative. I have wired in the pump and used a cable tie to hold the pink wire clear, just incase I find a use for it later.

I have started to reassemble the remaining engine parts. The intake manifold fitting is not covered very well in the manual. Is any sealant required on the intake gasket? Wellseal? 

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IMG_7329.thumb.PNG.b116c27c0f3adddbab04d64159ba7f41.PNGFound this for the spacer plates. The sealant page suggests the inlet manifold gasket is fitted dry, as is? 

IMG_7328.PNG

IMG_7330.PNG

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Looking fabulous mate! Can't say with authority but I believe the inlet gasket is to be installed dry. 

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Thanks. I believe it's dry also, but as always will double check. 

I took lots of pictures but as always seem to be missing some important ones and the nuts and bolts! 

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Ok, two issues.

Does the inlet manifold gasket have sealant?

Do the paper half shaft gaskets have sealant?

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A.  I've always used gasket cement as there are very few fasteners on the inlet manifold and water pipes also run through it.   You may 'get away' without cement, but I cant see any advantage in not using it?   (other than future cleanup & reassembly) 

B. I've dismantled a number of these and they all seem to have evidence of 'non hardening' type of cement on these gaskets (such as Wellseal).   Thats what I currently use.   The concern is that the gasket depth is material to the Diff preload, that's something I just make a judgement on during assembly.    

These are just my personal view....

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Thanks Steve. I just did a preload check and realised I forgot to fit the gaskets! So have to do it all again it was 9 Kgs with new bearings and no gaskets!  

As far as I can see the manual doesn't prescribe any sealant on the half shafts or inlet manifold. I'm inclined to use Wellseal for both. Any other views on this out there? I've tried looking for this on here and havn't found an answer??

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22 minutes ago, 910Esprit said:

A.  I've always used gasket cement as there are very few fasteners on the inlet manifold and water pipes also run through it.   You may 'get away' without cement, but I cant see any advantage in not using it?   (other than future cleanup & reassembly) 

B. I've dismantled a number of these and they all seem to have evidence of 'non hardening' type of cement on these gaskets (such as Wellseal).   Thats what I currently use.   The concern is that the gasket depth is material to the Diff preload, that's something I just make a judgement on during assembly.    

These are just my personal view....

B. Problem using method B to set the preload is the gasket with Wellseal has to be fitted. Then if the preload is OK but the backlash is off the whole thing has to come apart trashing the gaskets. Unless they are fitted dry first. 

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I make my own gaskets, buy an assortment of paper and punches and you can make as many gaskets as you need for not a lot of money....

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I've not had a problem with dry fitted intake gaskets, but a smear around the water passages can't hurt. 

Throwing (gasket + variable sealant) thickness into the diff preload measure seems more trouble than I'd endure. I'd do those dry.

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According to 'the book' .10mm of driveshaft housing adjustment =0.25kg of preload variation and the range of preload (for new bearings) is 6-9KG.  (i.e. a very generous 3kg range)   It therefore seems to me that the effect of the gasket cement can be pretty much disregarded from the overall calculations.   But its not my concrete floor at stake!

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I'm not sure how accurate this can be. The radius of the crown wheel position you have the string wrapped on will change the reading. Also there's no oil in the box increasing the resistance and the bearings and crown wheel will loosen as they are rotated as they have sat in the same position for 14 years!  Also I need to fill the crown wheel mechanism with oil. Think I need to oil everything and rotate the crownwheel for a bit then do it all again. Good point about the gasket thickness!

11 hours ago, snowrx said:

I've not had a problem with dry fitted intake gaskets, but a smear around the water passages can't hurt. 

Throwing (gasket + variable sealant) thickness into the diff preload measure seems more trouble than I'd endure. I'd do those dry.

I'm going to smear Wellseal around the intake and water holes. On the half shafts I will smear silicon sealer, after the preload and backlash stuff.

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Backlash

Didnt need to clamp the bearings. There was enough friction to hold it all in place. I have an average of 0.2 mm all around the crownwheel. All readings are almost exactly two. This can't be by chance! As I suspected someone has done this before and the car probably hasn't run since it was done.. I will fit the gaskets smeared with silicon and recheck the readings, the preload was 8 kgs after I lubricated some of the parts. 

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Well it was all going so well! There is no oil pressure in the oil pump. I tried to pump oil into the Turbo outlet pipe. Hardly any went in. All that happened was a massive lot of oil everywhere. I tried spinning the pump fir several minutes- still no pressure. I reckon there's an air blockage enroute to the pump. Any ideas? 

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I assume you definitely fitted the pickup olive and tightened?    To prime, I also use the Turbo oil feed, but just use a length of hose and a funnel and then let gravity do its work over a couple of hours.   Are you trying with or without the oil cooler in circuit?

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It's still onnthe stand. Oil plate blanked off. Just realised I should try rotating the oil pump backwards to suck the oil from the Turbo outlet! Will try this. I left for a think it as it was turning into a distaster!

Yep new oilive to correct torque.

Actually, I think I may connect a socketbonto my drill and try to spin up the pump. Less messy!

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Those of you that know me on here will understand I won't be beaten by an oil pump! Soooooo 

attempt one

Oil pumped into engine via Turbo outlet. Engine on stand. Oil plate blanked off. Pump rotated clockwise( mistake!)

attempt two

jist about to try the same thing and rotate the pump anti clockwise by hand.

clutch driveshaft

Thanks to Steve who gave me a Harry Marten circlip.

heres the pictures. The primary shaft has a recess where you push the clip into. Spring and shaft in first then clip. You can no longer pull the shaft out. Here's the picture I always wanted to see as I could never understand this!IMG_7347.thumb.JPG.aebb20d5cacf12b15718cd8a49c78786.JPGyou can see the recess where the clip fits in the end of the shaft.IMG_7348.thumb.JPG.4d6cd9df8dc80af57bc4a8c26971321b.JPGhere the clip is resting loosely on top of the primary shaft.IMG_7349.thumb.JPG.690c696a3552c5be18c06829dea9d1eb.JPGhere the clip is in position in the recess.

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Attempt two

I pumped the oil through the oil pressure guage point and rotated the pump anti clockwise with a drill and allen head bit. No effect. I then blanked off the Turbo and oil pressure guage holes check the oil level and spun the drill up clockwise to full speed. About 20 seconds later oil pissing out if the sand wichbplate I taped off. I then removed the oil pressure blank and oil also coming out at a fast rate! All in all it's working! If I was to do this again I wouldn't bother with an electrical pump. Just get a drill on it and spin the pump up. It was packed well with grease. 

At least I know it works. I should imagine when the engine is started I t might take a while for oil pressure to build as the oil cooler pipes are very long and with take quite a bit if oil! 

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Well now that trauma is over I'm waiting for a few bolts and a split pin then I can put the bell housing back on. Once this and the engine are together I have the problem of installing it with limited headroom for the crane. I'm thinking of faking the rear wheels of the car, lowering it, pushing the engine in position and jackingbthe body up around it. I can then put the wheels on and lower the engine the last bit to the chasis. Has anyone tried this?

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Backlash dial guage picIMG_7345.thumb.JPG.41855291f7734282f1d87122a016df48.JPGI found it best to rock the crown wheel several times to get the reading. I took lots of readings at different points. All within spec.

IMG_7350.thumb.JPG.5ba1d293c257e353e237e3de5a355fda.JPGNew seals

IMG_7351.thumb.JPG.1d6cdeb53a3168fad88cc381a6467417.JPGYou have got to get the tube the correct way round or it won't fit in the bell housing! 

This is now waiting for new bolts before sealing up.

Tomorrow the timing belt goes on and thanks to Jerry on here, I have the correct tensioner Guage. A real milestone! 

I'm posting all these pics so you don't have to waste hours like I have figuring all this out! 

I actually tried different positions of the dial guage to see how it affected readings. The answer was not much. I tried to get it as verticle as posible on the edge of the diameter. The above was not the final measuring point, but it gives you an idea.

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4 hours ago, Lotusfab said:

Well now that trauma is over I'm waiting for a few bolts and a split pin then I can put the bell housing back on. Once this and the engine are together I have the problem of installing it with limited headroom for the crane. I'm thinking of faking the rear wheels of the car, lowering it, pushing the engine in position and jackingbthe body up around it. I can then put the wheels on and lower the engine the last bit to the chasis. Has anyone tried this?

I have the same problem with limited headroom, also the legs of my crane foul the lower links with the car on the ground, solution remove the wheels from the crane, position the car under the raised Engine/transaxle.

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Work started at 0600 today. Oil all cleaned up. I have now drained the sump again, ready for the engine install. Timing belt is now on, but needs adjusting. Its necessary to consult the parts manual continuously to ensure all the washers, bolts nuts, spring washers are correct and the correct bolts are being used. There are some ferry odd lengths. Only way is to cut the bolts if necessary. The gearbox bolts are crucial. If the length is wrong some can foul the gears, it will be a big mess if you get it wrong! Only about seven days work from turning the key unless I get any unexpected problems. There are always a lot of those! 

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13 hours ago, Lotusfab said:

At least I know it works. I should imagine when the engine is started I t might take a while for oil pressure to build as the oil cooler pipes are very long and with take quite a bit if oil! 

I'd fill the oil cooler & it's pipes manually before starting the engine. :thumbup:

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Cheers,

John W

http://jonwatkins.co.uk

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