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Elite fuel gauge


rjbp

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POR15 is the way to go C - just doing the same to mine (following Mike's example). Stopping problems before they materialise at the roadside makes for much less stressful motoring.

I Like these cars too B-)

Read an article recent in one of the Classic car for sale weeklies about which lotus to own - the Elite and Eclat were marked as red (with virtually all other being green) apart from the later Elan (I think I remember that correctly). Left me with the impression that the author didn't know what end was up to be honest.

The main point was that Colin Chapman was aiming these cars away from the marques origins of  'sport' to the middle manager, luxury market - to be fair, although these cars were far ahead of their time in many design respects, I'd have to agree that some of the finishes were a long way from 'luxury'.

However, with care and sensitive upgrading I still think these cars offer great motoring on relatively small money and are massively under appreciated. Original Elites/Elans/Esprits are fine if you are a lot smaller than me and with a much bigger wallet. Essentially, from what I can see, they all suffer from very similar problems on the whole.

Good Luck

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Is the price for that bit in Yen or £?

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There is a historic picture of Colin Chaman and Jim Clark inspecting the Miura at the Lambo factory circa 1968. To my mind that must have planted a seed, as Lotus copied the late 60s Lambo approach to the range exactly;

Big Luxo - Elite - Espada

Big Coupe - Eclat - Jarama

Mid engine sportscar - Esprit - Miura

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In the garage no-one can hear you scream 

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Just cleaned out the carb’s , a lot of crud in the bottom and one jet blocked , the single long jet in the middle not one of the pairs , wouldn't idle below 1200 before. There was different crud in each , black fibrous in one and fine powder sand coloured in the other . Has been stood for 12 years and wonder what the inside of the tank is like . Have a filter between tank and pump but can I get super fine filter but would better to wash the tank out but with what ? Have the tank free to sort the sender out , try and get a light in it and see what I can see . Get the carbs back on this morning . 

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On 26/10/2016 at 19:06, rjbp said:

Just found this number in raised cast just below the starter D 907E 0050Y ,

That's the casting number - its on all of them.

Engine number is on the flat bit near the starter aperture.

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22 minutes ago, Dunc said:

That's the casting number - its on all of them.

Engine number is on the flat bit near the starter aperture.

Did recognise it as a cast/pattern number , has G74-06-7896 stamped near where you say but no one can recognise it . Carbs back and running a lot lot sweeter  but still not right , not popping back now so not to lean a mixture  , a web site says for a start screw back up the idle 2.5 turns ( one's with the springs ) but I'm way above that and can screw them several turns before it makes a difference . What are the screws with pointed ends near the idle screws that are locked with a nut , did notice a slight bend in the end of the point on two of them , put them back with the same standout ?

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I don't think your engine number is unusual for an early (1974) engine. They didn't go to two letters in stamping until 1975.

Your block started life as a 1974 Domestic, Spec 1 engine with D cams. (I'll revise what I said before now that I have looked it up rather than going by memory). D only meant aircon after 1975. In 1974 it meant "Domestic".

http://www.theymightberacing.com/Projects/FrameOff/JH74G/Docs/TDA_-_Naturally_Aspirated_-_907_911_912.pdf

However a block is just a block - you can spec them any way you wish on a rebuild, so I wouldn't set the clearances or timing as per the above for Spec 1 until after you know what cams are in it etc. Is there a tag on the carbs? 38mm chokes?

If your cars not a 1974, the engine number isn't original to your car.

For a "what is what" on a DHLA use the following link:

http://www.gruntled.com/Dellorto/Diagram.html

 

 

 

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Hi and thanks for the carb info , I have the first registed log book ( 1977 ) and a few when it changed hands all state the same different eng but not whats stamped on it . Its had a few major repairs to the engine and a rebuild in 88 so probably got replaced with an old but servisable engine . Carbs DHLA 45 and tags say  R5265 A & R5264 P don't know the choke . Worked for many years machining large castings that had the same casting number but machined to different drawings ,

Think I have bits missing ( definatly not in it when I disembled to clean it out ) diag no 52 Pump Jet Holder , removed the top brass screw and a wiggle to get it out leaving Pump Jet 7 behind and definatly no spring 53 in any 4 of them between the two . Could'nt get Pump Jet 7 out for fear of distorting it as it has a split cut in it and was tight in there  , so could I still have a blockage . Should Vacuum Blanking Screw 58 be screwd home and locked with the nut ?  

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Pulled the tank back again , removed the fuel gauge sender and had a look inside with a light , it was surprisingly quite clean , patchy stains only on the bottom that I though was sediment , poked it with a stick and didn't move or disperse so it's only staining . Couldn't see to both ends because of cross baffles but am convinced it fairly clean .

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thats good news on the tank. :-)

Your 1977 Elite would originally have been a spec 5 engine, and would have had spec 5 carbs - which the manual says should be numbered 5265 and 5294. :ermm: (I wonder if the manual is wrong, or if the stamp on your tag has gotten reversed?)

Unhelpfully, the manual doesn't say what the carb tags should be for Spec 1-3, but I can have a look at my 520 tonight and see what spec 3 is.

Solely on the basis of the engine stamping  my guess its a 1974  2L spec 1 engine on D cams. If you can borrow a bore-scope off someone, have a look in the spark plug hole at the pockets in the pistons and compare them to the shape on Page 10.

If its saddle shaped like the one on the right, its a 2.2 conversion, if the recesses is "mound" or "loaf shaped" like the one on the left of Page 10, then its probably a 2 litre (of course the pistons could have been changed to any 3rd party manufacturer in a rebuild, so not definitive).

You can id the cams by the number of groves on the shank nearest the pulley. One grove is D cams, two groves is E. If its a single groove and a 38mm choke in the dellorto, it looks like someone has transplanted the 1974 spec 1 engine into a 1977 car.

A change from a 2 litre spec 1 from a Spec 5 is no big change, but perhaps not the rebuilt 2.2 you were hoping for.

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I've got a 3 mm dia probe light so put it down the plug hole with the piston at the bottom , canot get a line of site to see valve clearence shapes in the piston because of the canshaft cover bit what I can see looks flat so probably a 2 ltr.  Presume the grooving is in the camshaft , although the pulley boss that goes into the seal has 3 grooves . The carbereta numbers I mentioned are on an ally tag held in place with one of the float chamber lid screws . The pile of bills etc. I have go up to 1988 and presume the owners after that did'nt keep any records but in a new owner 1982 loge book it is decaired as 2173 cc and also in an Exchange & Mart advert for it also states 2.2 , probably started out 2 then a 2.2 fitted but now swaped back to a 2 . Engine rumming quite sweet now but I've got the bakes off so can't go anywhere to try a run , auto box works in the yard but can't get any speed up , power stering works ok also .

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Measured it 3 times , made certain I kept the rod vertical and square to the piston , defiantly 3” . I’ve had a engineering company since 72 and have now retired , made structural bearings for bridges , turbine casings , multi stage gas compressor castings . Although retired I can’t leave it alone so have set up a machine and wood shop at home , smaller way not the 2 meter diameter I used to do . 

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907 2 litre has a stroke of 69.2 mm, the 912 2.2 litre has a stroke of 76.2 mm so a 7mm difference which is obvious when measuring, 76.2 mm is equal to 3 inches so you definitely have a 2.2, the 907 engine number merely means it started life as a 2 litre, very easy to retrofit a longer throw crank when rebuilding so it is not that unusual.

David

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  • 2 weeks later...

In its history it had a rebuild in 88 and wonder if it was converted to run on unleaded , no way to tell without the head off , not much unleaded about in 88 so doubt if it has or could have beed converted .

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Found this on the net but other sites mention piston rings and valve guides that might need attention .

 

 

THE TRUTH ABOUT UNLEADED

TO : MARQUE-BY-MARQUE GUIDE 

ADAPTED FROM "THOROUGHBRED & CLASSIC CARS" MAY 1998

There are many good reasons why this shouldn't happen, but it will: now we need to know how to run our classic cars. It's not as bad as you might think. For most of us, there will be no need to take any action for many years. During extensive research for this feature, we found no consensus of opinion on what can and cannot, should and should not be done to classic-car engines when four-star finally disappears. Don't believe opportunist mechanics who claim that because your car is over 20 years old, it has to have $$$-worth of conversion. Many old cars need no conversion work at all, while others can be converted. Equally, don't believe those who say that pre-war cars are OK because there was no lead in petrol before the war; modern unleaded petrol is very different from pre-war fuel - it burns at higher temperatures, and hard-driven pre-war cars can still suffer. This guide should help you decide how to keep enjoying your classic well without breaking the bank.

THREE CHOICES: 

MECHANICAL

Installing higher-specification valve seats/valves plus, usually. It is best carried out in conjunction with a planned decoke or engine rebuild. Some engines are easier to tackle than others, but very few are impossible. It is essential that the work is carried out diligently - poorly fitted valve seat inserts can come loose and wreak havoc within precious old engines...

ADDITIVES

The additives used (usually sodium or potassium based) do not afford as good protection as lead, but are better than nothing. It will be the same octane as premium so retarding the ignition will not be necessary. Oft-the-shelf additives are unlikely to be better: chemists worldwide have been trying for 20 years to find an effective alternative to lead -they're unlikely to find one in the next 18 months.

DO NOTHING

Cars already driven on leaded have a "lead memory" that can last for 20,000 miles before valve seat recession has any effect. Cars with the softest valve seats can continue to run indefinitely without modification if driven gently. Ensure your cooling system is in perfect condition with the correct thermostat, re-route fuel lines to avoid vaporization. The vast majority of classic-car drivers will never need to do anything more.

 
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