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Running in guidance


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When I collected my Sport 380 a few weeks ago, the dealer told me not to exceed 4,000 rpm and only to use light throttle for the first 600 miles and even then to take it easy prior to the 1,000 mile service.  The W word was mentioned a few times at this point, along with data logging etc.

So for a few days I was tootling around, studiously observing this advice.  And then I read the manual (see pic attached).  This states quite clearly that there is no need for a hard 4,000 rpm rev limit and furthermore that occasional bursts of higher revs and wider throttle openings will be beneficial in helping to bed in the piston rings.  By the time I read this, I was approaching 200 miles, so happily followed the manual, and introduced occasional bursts of more spirited use.

I've since read quite a few references to other owners being given guidance that conflicts with the manual.  Jokke said his dealer advised 3,500 the 4,500 revs limits. M4ark posted a while back referring to a 4,000 limit.  Last night I watch Seb Delaney's most recent vlog (re first 1,000km) and he mentioned a strict 4,000 rpm rev limit - and I think he collected his car from the factory.

Is it me, or is there a load of garbage being advised left right and centre on running in?  In the end, it may not actually matter that much, as subsequent use and regularity of oil changes etc might be more important to the long term health of our engines, but I was just surprised that nobody else seemed to have RTFM :)  And the manual implies that if you do stick to a strict rev limit your piston rings may not bed in properly, which I assume could be detrimental, so arguably, the slightly inaccurate advice being given could be negligent.

 

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An age old debate with no clear resolution I'm afraid. Certainly labouring the engine and leaving the car on cruise control at a constant 4,000rpm like Seb Delanney did is worse for the engine th

I subscribe to the Motoman school of running in, which has served me well for three different engines now: 2.0L Duratec, the MZR variant and now the V6. That's really all about the first 100 miles, af

What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??   What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ?? The Short Answer: Run it Hard ! Interesting read …..  http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_

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Running in is a myth IMO. People who build race engines give them full beans from the start to bed the rings in properly. 

It was me mentioned before the running in period is for the driver to get used to the power of the car.

 

buddsy

 

"Belief is the enemy of knowing" - Crrow777

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The engine arrives in a box from Toyota. I doubt Camry customers strictly adhere to a running in schedule and they're going to expect 250,000 trouble free miles from their 'Yota.

Clearly it doesn't make 380hp in any of its Toyota applications, but I wouldn't be too paranoid about it. The manual advise sounds sensible to me. I stick to that and don't thrash it until the first service service is done.

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Interesting discussion. Another myth: Porsche used to test every 5th engine on a engine test bed (hot) right after it was built. Bringing the engine to the max. Making sure it delivered what was claimed.

Those engines were rumored to be the most powerful and best and some customers always wanted to make sure they get one of those ...

Certainly not a soft run in ?

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Running in is going to depend on different things, such as The Pits says about the end game of a race engine. Actually their engines have a very short life span with a much smaller safety margin (read as- they don't add lots of metal for no reason), so if they ran them in they'd end up with an engine that's not going to last as many races as the non-run in ones.

 

Another factor is machining, the tighter the components are the greater the need for running in, modern machining is more precise than it used to be (mass market stuff), so you can now (as a mass market motor manufacturer) make the engine less tight on average but not end up with lots of engines sounding like a sack of spanners. build engines in the 70s with an average engine not excessively tight and you'd have to scrap a lot of engines. Add to that the accuracy (straightness, etc not just overall dimensions), and you end up now with components that are a better fit straight away,not having to truly bed in and wear off high spots.

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All good points.  To me, the manual's guidance seems very sensible.  Key point is no sustained high revs.  Driving on cruise is a bad idea.  Whenever I've had running in guidance on other cars over the years it's been broadly "don't kill it, but be up and down the revs and up and down the gears".  Which is largely what the manual says.

Virtually all of the 300 miles I've done so far have been country roads, which more or guarantees the right sort of conditions and driving style.

My main point was, why are all the dealers making up something different from what the manual says (recognising that my use of "all" is a bit sweeping).

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Their advise is about right for the first 600 miles, generally stay below 4000rpm (don't use full throttle) and start extending it for short burst from then until the 1st service. They're just being overly cautious with their advise which isn't necessarily a bad thing. They download the data log at services and if you have an engine problem further down the line it's going to be better if you under-stressed it rather than over-stressed in the first 1000 miles.

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What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ?? 
 What's The Best Way To Break-In A New Engine ??

The Short Answer: Run it Hard !

Interesting read …..  http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

@MartynB- you beat me by a minute. :D

 

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Jack
2008 2-Eleven
2015 Exige V6 CupR
Track videos ... http://www.youtube.com/jackcup
2010 Lotus Challenge Series ULTRA Class champion
2012 Lotus CUP USA OPEN Class champion

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I've read lots of different theories out there about soft v hard running in, it is very confusing.  When I got my E92 M3 I stuck to the rules, you didn't have a choice because the rev limiter was reduced to 5,500rpm until the ECU was updated at the service.  With that car it was my first properly fast car so I was pleased about the restriction placed on the driver as it gave good time to get used to the performance.  I'm inclined to think that is one of the main reasons Lotus adopt their 1,000 mile running in policy too because surely after a few hundred miles the engine is good to go and be driven as it was intended...even if the driver may not be used to that level of power.

I was given good advice from B&C which was inline with the handbook.  I was slightly concerned that I had 160 miles to drive back home when I collected the car, pretty much all on motorway and dual carriage way but B&C gave me good suggestions of how to deal with this.  I made sure I was regularly changing gear, RPM and road speed while not exceeding the 4000 rpm limit.  In fact I noticed that the shift lights came on at around 4,100 rpm when I slightly exceeded the limit driving off a roundabout when I was nearly home.  After 600 miles I did use short bursts of higher RPM and full throttle, again in line with the manual.  Fortunately, I had a couple of long A and B road journey's to go on so I soon covered the 1,000 miles and running in was all behind me!

It is difficult to know what is best, I decided I'd go with the handbook so if there was an issue it couldn't be pinned on that.

After the running in service, I checked if there were any further requirements (my previous M3 required a further 100 miles I think)...the response I got was brilliant..."nope, give it hell and enjoy it".  So true!

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I would go with the manual over what the dealer says. I ran my V6 Cup in religiously and it has yet to use a single drop of oil between annual services. Pulls like James Hunt in a nunnery too!

:thumbup:

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agreed. Difficult to be criticised for following the manual. 

I would just note that the manual allows > 4,000 rpm before 600 miles. In short bursts. M4rks post above suggests otherwise, at least the way I read it. 

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Yeah, I think we're broadly in agreement and the operative clause in the manual is "However, being too sympathetic on the car will not allow the piston rings to bed in satisfactorily". I'm not impressed that they don't mention bringing the engine up to temperature before giving it some, but otherwise I think you can read plenty of the way I do it into the words they've chosen.

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I have done the "running in" on highway.

Alternatively driving at 90, 110, 130 km/h and playing with the gearbox to use all gears. I used the "rest area" : 6 -> 1 and 1 -> 6 : if someone was observing me, he could say "this guy is crazy or he want to show his car", but it's a good exercise to manage the brake and the gearbox. 

I have clearly do short burst above 4000tr during the running in.

 

 

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