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Mark Blanchard

MOT's no longer required for 40 year old cars

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As of 20th May 2018 the Government has decided 40 year old cars (and older) will no longer require an MOT. It will happen on a rolling basis. Q plate cars and cars with a 15% increase in the power to weight ratio are excluded.

Seems bonkers to me.

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/roadworthiness-testing-for-vehicles-of-historic-interest

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I suppose it means less admin but lots of us will still MOT them (one of mine is 40+ years but not on the road) as it's a good defence of "I believed it to be roadworthy, and any defect can only have happened very recently because it was checked at the start of summer when I started using it this year and have made visual checks since then."

Lots of the test doesn't apply, such  as tight emissions, certain lights, number plate types etc.

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My insurance for my Climax Elite is very specific: no MOT no cover!  Sounds like a minefield to me!

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Not a good idea IMO but let see how the rolling bit goes.  Road tax exemption started out as a rolling thing and was soon stopped. However I guess the government wont "earn" much out of this compared to road tax.

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I don't mind as my 1960 mini will be fully restored by then and already tax free, insurance is £38 a year so cheap motoring. Mind at the same time MOT's have never been an issue as I look after my cars, in 20 years only had a few failures I remember which were sorted with 24hrs.

All depends on the owners I guess but can imagine some knackered beetles/minis  driving around soon which is not ideal.

Dave :) 

 


Do or do not, there is no try! 

 

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You might not be insured even with an MOT.  Check the Insurance policy's wording, some say:  "In the event of a claim, the vehicle will be checked for roadworthiness, regardless of having a current MoT."  I bought a car with 4 months MOT and I had to spend 4k getting it roadworthy.

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Sounds like the mini when we bought it Mark, just spent £6k on the body alone and it had a new MOT. I will check the insurance if the MOT ruling arrives, it is with Footman James. 

Dave :) 

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Do or do not, there is no try! 

 

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Bad idea imo,   Lots of classic car owners look after their cars,  But i think this will end up causing dramas,  As Dave says about the old beetles and minis etc driving around with floorpans missing lol,  Some owners will be taking the piss,  i.e driving around knowing full well the car they are driving is a dangerous bag of sxxt,  but some owners will also be unaware that the car they are a driving is dangerous. 

Just another grey area the goverment will be making,  They seem really good at making grey areas that leave them not liable when it all goes wrong  :angry:


A

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I agree.......I like having an MoT test on my old cars......just because it gives me that peace of mind that someone else is happy with my handywork........lol

I really think they should keep this......just for the sake of the less capable motorist who, if it does go, could be sold a 'pup'....

just opens a whole can of worms for the crims and conmen to join in

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The Faster You Drive...The Slower You Age

(Albert Einstein  14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955)

 

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Never even thought about the buying side of purchasing Gareth,  very  good point :(


A

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Quote

Draft Advice (not part of the Draft Guidance)

What do I need to do if I am responsible for a vehicle aged more than 40 years old and first registered in or after 1960?

From 20 May 2018 most of these vehicles will not need a valid MOT certificate to be used on public roads. You still need to keep the vehicle in a roadworthy condition and can voluntarily have a test. We recommend continued regular maintenance and checks of the vehicle.

You need to check whether the vehicle has been substantially altered since 1988, checking against the criteria (in the guidance above).

If it has been altered substantially a valid MOT certificate will continue to be required. If you are unsure check, for example from a qualified mechanic or expert on historic vehicles.

If you buy a vehicle, we also recommend checking with the previous owner if you can. If your vehicle is exempt from needing an MOT test (and you do not choose to do not have a valid MOT certificate for it) you will need to declare this when you apply for the exemption from road tax.

If you are responsible for a large goods vehicle (more than 3.5 tonnes) or public service vehicle (with 12 or more passenger seats), you will continue to require a valid test certificate. What do I need

whilst you dont need one....it appears you can get one if you want.......


The Faster You Drive...The Slower You Age

(Albert Einstein  14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955)

 

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Crazy idea. I would at least have been better ii it were a restricted test, say brakes and serious corrosion at least. quick 10 mins on the ramp, minimum fee of say £10 and everyone happy knowing that if nothing else it's not going to fall to bit's or have you doing a Fred Flintstone, and new buyer has some idea of what it's like. Most importantly. It's going to have a chance of stopping when you want it to.

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Yes, an interesting one from the insurance angle. Yet another loop hole forming for them to crawl through and catch folk out. Like those owners retrofitting LED lighting to 1960's car, which potentially makes them illegal.

Nothing stopping an owner from MOTg a car annually. Quite often it's undue pressure on an owner to prepare their old cats (*cars* unless Jaguar owners) for needless deadlines to continue registration, rather than SORN'g their cars.

I think it'll work well for me on that basis, as I'm a very low mileage user of my classics.

However anyone MOTg a vehicle and then not correcting reported faults before having an accident will be immediately suspected of negligence and knowingly driving an unroadworthy car.

Edited by Fridge

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I think if I was a buyer........I would insist it at least came with one.......

if the vendor doesnt want to put one on it....then Id walk away knowing that Id not bought a dodgey motor........

Id take refusal as an admission of guilt that they were trying to sell you a crock

:ph34r:

 

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The Faster You Drive...The Slower You Age

(Albert Einstein  14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955)

 

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35 minutes ago, theelanman said:

I think if I was a buyer........I would insist it at least came with one.......

if the vendor doesnt want to put one on it....then Id walk away knowing that Id not bought a dodgey motor........

Id take refusal as an admission of guilt that they were trying to sell you a crock

:ph34r:

 

I think that's a very limited viewpoint to take, and could preclude you from making a very wise purchase. After all some bargains are not even roadworthy.

You can always get an engineer's report, which far more extensive than a rather basic MOT.

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I was generalising.......if I was a punter on the street with not much knowledge of classics...but wanted one....then this would be my first point of call rather than spending hundreds on a proper Engineers survey.......

I would trust my own knowledge to buy a classic........as always...........but without an MoT could give me a stronger position to barter.........is it a perfect car?......rolling restoration?........or a project?

its going to be a minefield what ever............:blush:


The Faster You Drive...The Slower You Age

(Albert Einstein  14 March 1879 - 18 April 1955)

 

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This rule already applies to pre 1960 cars and hasn't caused any real problems has it? If a valid MOT is not necessary I don't know how thorough an MOT tester would be knowing that whatever he finds doesn't have to be acted upon? As for it stopping a car having the floors hanging out... you can cut a foot square hole in the floor if you want and as long as you put some tape on the edges it will still pass I believe!

Edited by Paul Coleman
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Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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I think the MOT has lost its relevance over the years in any case. It is a very basic test and from a safety point of view; brakes, tyres etc these are areas where any Classic owner would be sorting in any case. It's job in current times is with ensuring owners of 5 -20 year old cars don't  scrimp on these areas to save money. As well as policing emissions in the greener world we now live in. 

For most of us classic owners the MOT was a box ticking exercise for our cars and has never brought any issues up.

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Look what Q's brought us. Isn't it nice!

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3 hours ago, winners said:

I think the MOT has lost its relevance over the years in any case. It is a very basic test and from a safety point of view; brakes, tyres etc these are areas where any Classic owner would be sorting in any case. It's job in current times is with ensuring owners of 5 -20 year old cars don't  scrimp on these areas to save money. As well as policing emissions in the greener world we now live in. 

For most of us classic owners the MOT was a box ticking exercise for our cars and has never brought any issues up.

As somebody who is currently restoring a car which has been off the road since 1978 I do think there should be a clause which says that if a vehicle has been off the road for that amount of time it should be given the 'once over' just to make sure whoever restored it has done it properly.


Lotus Esprit [meaning] a 1:1 scale Airfix kit with a propensity to catch fire

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11 minutes ago, Paul Coleman said:

As somebody who is currently restoring a car which has been off the road since 1978 I do think there should be a clause which says that if a vehicle has been off the road for that amount of time it should be given the 'once over' just to make sure whoever restored it has done it properly.

That would make sense. Home restorers are more often than not hobbyist mechanics and a professional once over, even just basic would be advised.

Fortunately I know my MOT'r well, and will continue to use him. Certainly when commissioning a newly restored car. For peace of mind if nothing else.

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First time I got my Esprit tested passed no issues.

2nd time fail as had excessive play in the steering...turns out a bolt had become loose as I hadn't tightened it up enough/properly when I done the rebuild.

I check my lights and general stuff each time before an MOT but I would never had picked up the steering issue.

I would much rather take my car in for a test each year it also forces me not to be lazy and put off the little jobs I should check but probably wouldnt get round to without the threat of a MOT.

Also Ive seen some very old shitbags on the road, horseboxes and old campervans that look like must have only just scraped through an MOT but heyho all will be fine now!

 

buddsy

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"Belief is the enemy of knowing" - Crrow777

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Wouldn't matter to me - it'd still be heading for an mot every year


Only here once

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There is a broader spectrum of owners to consider as well? Whilst many have the capability and aptitude to work on their own vehicles and identify any issues, I would suggest, there are just as many classic car owning enthusiasts who do not have this expertise and are dependant on the MOT to raise any such problems and advisory :rtfm::D

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Caught between a rock and a hard place in a catch 22 situation, So its 6 of one and half a dozen of the other. Your damned if you do, but your damned if you don't so shut your cock!!!!!!!!!!!

Lotus Espirt Turbo S3    

Lotus Esprit S4 

Lotus Elise S2 Sport 130

pig_zps6d7342f1.jpg

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