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tom kilner

clutch anti-seize device

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Pictured is my custom anti seize device.

It took quite a while to raise the back end safely to use the brakes to free the clutch - last time I just used the starter but it wasn't strong enough this time ). Earth floor...

I believe the cable is no more fatigued by being under constant tension for a month or so,  although I'm happy to take advice on the clutch springs.

A couple of details I would like some advice on- there appears to be no braking from the pedal on the back right wheel (rear axle jacked up to free off the clutch) and on the road the brakes pull in an unpredictable way. The same wheel doesn't run very true either (still off the ground) although the bearings and links feel OK.

Any advice welcome - thanks.

Tom

2018-02-08 14.07.22.jpg

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Not too sure about that cable being under constant tension. If the cars up on stands. Start her up every couple of weeks and run her in gear. This will also help prevent the water pump from leaking by running the engine until up to normal temperature for a while. Have you checked the drive shafts and to see if the wheel is true.

 

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Thanks John - took me a couple of months to change the cambelt  hence the rusty clutch plates - now the back's on stands (well, bricks) I thought I'd grease the ujs - sadly not a nipple  in sight. All feels tight though so I wonder if the wobbly wheel is the wheel itself.

Can the ujs be lubed at all otherwise? maybe a little squit with grease-in-a-can to prevent moisture ingress?

I ride over the old Severn bridge every week so I'm happy with cables under tension (although not all the engineers working there are,  but then those cables are 50 years old and a bit rusty). It seems it's the stress/unstress cycle that causes fatigue. The clutch springs being compressed though might set them a little weaker. Also the plates being separated could lead to more general rust on the flywheel.

I will report back on that one.

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All fine with the above, but with that constant stress on the cable it's going to stretch and will require regular adjustment. They are also prone to snap at the nipple on the fork.

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Good point re:stretching.

I will start it every few weeks as also it helps dry out the exhaust. When the roads are dry I'll go for a spin too.

Any suggestion as to the random braking and unaffected rear wheel?

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Isn't the cable under constant tension anyway? It is on my S2 with the Getrag - cant remember what is is like on the S1as I've not had a road worthy one in about 15 years.

I suspect you have a sticky rear wheel cylinder. This happens on cars that don't move often. Could also be the handbrake mechanism, but until you pop the drums off for a look you wont know which.

Don't bother trying to lube sealed unit UJ's - its a waste of time - I have tried and failed in the past. Prising the seal open means it'll never sit back in place properly again and it just chucks the lubricant out as it rotates. Cheap and easy(ish) to replace with new ones. Its handy to have a spare pair of shafts on the bench to swap in and out as required if your using the car a lot or if your heavy with your right foot.

I used to get a seizing clutch on my excel. Regular use is key.

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So when you say "pop the drums off" dunc  I can do just that?  I'm scared of the talk I see of dropping the diff... I don't mind undoing some bolts and pulling a drum apart,  even replacing a slave cylinder or two,  it's the preparation that scares me.

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Drums aren't to bad to do Tom, the issue comes when trying to adjust hand brake cables on the cross over piece. I f you do go ahead and pull the drums, make sure to give the wheel cylinders a look at so that they have not seized on the slides. Have fun.

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You can inspect the cylinders with the drums off. This way you can see if the wheel cylinder is moving and get at it with the persuader/grips. It is tricky to replace the cylinders, but you don't need to drop the diff.

On mine, the piston on the wheel cylinder wouldn't come out even on the bench vice. The wheel cylinder itself needed replacement, which can be a faff as your dealing with ancient brake pipes/unions.

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