free hit
counters
cambelt - Engine/Ancilliaries - The Lotus Forums Jump to content

Recommended Posts

How long have you (or would you) leave between cam belt changes?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Upgrade today to remove Google ads and support TLF.

Depends on which type belt you have fitted...

 

A-prefix, B-prefix, or blue Gates Racing.

 

Trapezoid or round teeth?

 

,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I know that 2 years is what Lotus say, but do you keep to that no matter what?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 maximum 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Factory recommendation (at least in the USA) was 2 years/25K miles on the A-prefix black belts...3 years/36K miles on the B-prefix belts.

 

The Gates Racing blue belt is not a factory part so it's anybody's guess. BUT the Gates literature says they are :

 

"3x Stronger and 3x more Heat Resistant than Stock Belts. High Saturation HNBR Elastomeric Composites Assist with Exceptional Durability and Heat Resistance. Reinforced Tooth Jacket Provides Extra Wear Resistance, Doubling Tooth Strength. High Strength Glass Cords Further Increase Durability. "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I change them as follows

  • Two for LC - Turbo Esprit
  • Three for HC - Excel SE

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Also, don't forget:  the time interval is for belts that are tensioned. 

 

So if you assemble a motor (or your Esprit is off the road for some reason, maybe @Barrykearley hasn't bought it yet) :P you need to start counting the minutes THEN. :blush:

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought the time was from when it starts the heat cycles.

 

buddsy

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sure, heat cycles could be a failure or age factor.

 

BUT, if you think about it, the stress on a timing belt is worse (in certain places along the length) than if the engine is running. Those stressed areas are the parts that will fail.

We've had local owners who 'winter' their cars for 6 months a year and then had an older black belt fray and unravel. :cry:  That with less than 10K miles (admittedly, 10 years or more.   I would NEVER let a TB go THAT long.)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just bought a blue belt from Gary Kemp. He states that they were manufactured for the American market to guarantee 100k in the first instance and then upgraded again to 150k. This was to prevent cambelt failure on new cars within the first few years. The car manufacturers would have been made liable for the damaged caused due to failure. As a consequence the blue belt was developed. The colour is purely to identify the product. Gary was explaining that the rest of the timing pulleys, camshaft etc would most likely wear out first, not as a consequence of the blue belt just because they last so long. 

I’m changing the tensioner from the semi automatic to the manual tensioner and only expect to change tensioner bearings and perhaps camseals anytime in the future. Just keep putting the same belt back on. Thats the plan anyway.. I will let you know in 10 yrs or so.. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree the blue belt should last (a lot) longer then 2 years. But it's still cheap enough to refit a new one if you take it off for the tensioner bearing or such.

I use a standard belt and will replace every 2.5 to 3 years, which will be about 25k miles.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For one reason an another I'm just about to change mine again. It's been on for nearly 5 years....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments guys, just booked mine in to GST, guess I shouldn't push my luck any further.

20 hours ago, top-plumber said:

Just bought a blue belt from Gary Kemp. He states that they were manufactured for the American market to guarantee 100k in the first instance and then upgraded again to 150k. This was to prevent cambelt failure on new cars within the first few years. The car manufacturers would have been made liable for the damaged caused due to failure. As a consequence the blue belt was developed. The colour is purely to identify the product. Gary was explaining that the rest of the timing pulleys, camshaft etc would most likely wear out first, not as a consequence of the blue belt just because they last so long. 

I’m changing the tensioner from the semi automatic to the manual tensioner and only expect to change tensioner bearings and perhaps camseals anytime in the future. Just keep putting the same belt back on. Thats the plan anyway.. I will let you know in 10 yrs or so.. 

Interesting, not heard about this blue belt before, what is the cost of it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About £120 I think

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, pete said:

About £120 I think

Kemp’s charged me £150 it was on eBay for £155... huge discount i here you cry. 

Not sure who else stocks them..

764F5461-A3D4-4404-A8DE-3E07267410F3.jpeg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No brush needed.

 

Looks the business with blue silicone hoses!

PA050020.JPG

Edited by CarBuff
  • Love 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So how long will you leave the blue belt before changing it ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

150,000 miles according to @top-plumber

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah noted, well i'm about to have my belt done at a cost of £500ish, would make financial sense to have a blue belt fitted then would never need to have it changed again as only do about 1200 miles a year! or does it degrade with time I wonder...hmmm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Presumably blue belt only for later HTD round tooth pulleys?

The other aspect of timing belts is the older rubber have a shelf life so make sure the date code is not ages old. 

Also tensioner bearings never seem to be as long lasting as they used to be in the old days. There seems to be a lot of low quality bearings around these days.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For the trapezoidal tooth belt, the blue Gates Racing belt part number is T104RB. They are slightly narrower (as are the later Esprit's Gates belts) but they work well.

http://www.lotustalk.com/forums/5002618-post1.html

 

 

For the eccentric type tensioner bearing, a good brand Flennor FS03299

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, esprit22 said:

Yeah noted, well i'm about to have my belt done at a cost of £500ish, would make financial sense to have a blue belt fitted then would never need to have it changed again as only do about 1200 miles a year! or does it degrade with time I wonder...hmmm

Don't forget about the tensioner bearing, that's going to have to be changed long before 150K, can the tensioner be removed without removing/releasing the belt?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, pete said:

150,000 miles according to @top-plumber

According to Gary Kemp actually Pete. I wouldn’t presume to have his knowledge or skills. However I am inclined to believe that 100k is achievable with a high degree of confidence. ✌️

2 hours ago, Andyww said:

Presumably blue belt only for later HTD round tooth pulleys?

The other aspect of timing belts is the older rubber have a shelf life so make sure the date code is not ages old. 

Also tensioner bearings never seem to be as long lasting as they used to be in the old days. There seems to be a lot of low quality bearings around these days.

I have changed all the pulleys as I think the HTD tooth is more reliable also. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×