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ekwan

Cambelt tensioner bearing

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I am about to do my first cam belt change on a 1984 NA S3. 

Can anyone advise if the tensioner bearing (part no. 27) is usually changed as part of the procedure. Car has done 22,995 miles form new, but previous history is unknown. TIA.

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Generally yes, they are not expensive. As its some 34 years old, why not treat it to a full rebuild?

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..and the pin (28) ..and the main thing is to get the belt tension correct, as I found out!

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2 hours ago, esprit22 said:

..and the pin (28) ..and the main thing is to get the belt tension correct, as I found out!

That was going to be my next question. Other than a mega expensive tool, which other method of tensioning..........the 90 degree twisting method?

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Twist is all down to how much force you apply, Krikit is specifically not for these type of belts but many do use it successfully. I use a Facom DM16 but there are many equivalent items a lot cheaper.

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I get it about there with a Krikit, then refine using Speedy Spectrum on my mobile phone.

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And he has done plenty of them

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I bought this new in 1984. It cost £££. These gauges come up on Ebay USA fairly often but the type for the right belt size is needed.

DSCN3597.JPG

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Magic :thumbsup:

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With the Burroughs, you squeeze your hand and so press the black knob towards the line of the two metal pins that are near it. You then place the tool on the belt with the belt below the two legs, but above the black pin that is just below the dial. The spring mechanism then measures the resistance stopping the black pin going back to its resting place. You read it by the markings on the dial lining up with the mark.

DM16 is similar method but it's just lines on a plunger rather than a rotating scale.

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tension.png

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I always use a Clavis meter as per the Lotus Service Notes. Easy to use, and accurate.

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12 minutes ago, Chillidoggy said:

I always use a Clavis meter as per the Lotus Service Notes. Easy to use, and accurate.

This is the G-Car forum though, thats far too modern :)

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29 minutes ago, Andyww said:

This is the G-Car forum though, thats far too modern :)

Ah, sorry. In that case a twist of a thumb and finger will suffice!

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I recall MattDebbage had fitted a new belt to his \excel, used the Krikit as advised, but was getting squeal. I said I'd pop round and listen (not suspecting the tension),  but found it was the bearing of the tensioner making the noise. Set it by hand, checked belt by twist method, and noise had then gone. Checked my belt's tension using same gauge and both his (after the adjustment) and mine read the same on the gauge but not what the instruction would have you believe is the "correct" setting.

So, I trust the thumb & finger, but a gauge is so easy as you can put it in place and turn the adjuster whilst watching the gauge move.

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1 hour ago, Chillidoggy said:

Ah, sorry. In that case a twist of a thumb and finger will suffice!

I know at least one respected Lotus specialist always used exactly that method. He used to consider Borroughs gauges for wimps.

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Nearly 40 years I've been doing belts using deflection/twist/instinct.  Never once had an issue.  Lotus engines are the only ones on which I use tools/technology.  I think people can be a little too precious about belt tension.

I recall Choppa arriving here for a belt change a while back.  The tensioner had collapsed and seized, and I was able to remove the belt from the cam sprockets with my little finger.  It drove here just fine (don't try this at home, kids).

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Grab and twist is certainly good enough for the prancing pony brigade 

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18 minutes ago, Barrykearley said:

Grab and twist is certainly good enough for the prancing pony brigade 

There are endless discussions on cam belts on Ferrarichat, ad nauseum.

Which is pretty pointless as the V8 engines have no adjustment to do. They have spring-loaded tensioners so all you do is let them take up the slack then lock them. Nothing to discuss but somehow people bang on endlessly about frequencies etc. Its all part of the mystique which allows specialists to charge £1000 for changing belts which can be done in 4 hours max as they are dead easy.

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I succumbed to the temptation and bought a Facom DM.16 for under £90. :devil:

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7 hours ago, Andyww said:

There are endless discussions on cam belts on Ferrarichat, ad nauseum.

And on TLF.

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Blue? Who mentioned blue??

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Blue is for Rice Rockets.

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