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Fitted 235/35/19 & 275/30/20 Michelin Pilot Sport 4S - Page 2 - Ride/Handling/Suspension/Brakes/Wheels/Tyres - The Lotus Forums Jump to content
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Fitted 235/35/19 & 275/30/20 Michelin Pilot Sport 4S

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Hi mik

yes I had way too much fun power sliding round the mountain roads but had to drive back on canvas 😬

wont be doing that again.

is there no clearance problems with the bigger tyre?

thanks 

 

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A track setup could change the suspension geometry to run more camber which will cause more wear on the inside of the tyre. 

If you have excessive inside wear it might be worth getting the geometry checked and returned back to the factory setup if you don’t intend to take the car on the track.

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So it looks like I can't source the MPSP4S tyres for my front wheels (225/40 R18) and I don't want to mix my tyres when I change them.

Does anyone have any experience of "Goodyear Eagle F1 Asymmetric 3" tyres?

 

That being said, I can source the MPS4 okay so I will probably fall back to these; again if anyone has experience of these and any comparison against the P-Zeros that would be great!

Edited by Techyd

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I have the Michelin pilot sport 4 on my Evora, they were recommended by Hofmann's who service my car for me.  I prefer them to the P-zeros that we're on the car when I bought it.  Possibly its because the Pirellis were a little bit old (but they still had plenty of tread depth).  But I find my current tyres have more front end grip and there is more feedback and feel through the steering wheel.  The wet weather performance is better too, the Pirellis felt a bit nervous over puddles like they weren't quite cutting through the water properly, while I'm much more confident with the MPS4.

I recently did a track day at Bedford this December, the day started cold and damp, the track dried up to the end but don't think the air temp went above 10 degC.  The tyres performed fine, there was consistent grip and didn't feel like they were overheating and grip falling away my last stint was 40mins long.  They wore evenly and I only took ~2 mm off the rears.  I'm still quite new to track driving so possibly I wasn't pushing hard enough but I was getting tyre squeal and a tiny bit out of shape every now then when trying to push it so hope I was giving the tyres a reasonable amount of work to cope with.

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Hi.

First post on any forum ever, so apologies in advance...….

Following my purchase last year, I now need to change the two rear tyres on my Sports Racer S (manual, Daytona blue, for those interested) otherwise I will not be passing the soon due MOT...…..

It currently wears the LS version of the P-Zero Corsa at 20". I've read this thread and other threads both here and elsewhere and I'm happy to move to the MPS4S, due to cost and supply of the P-Zeros and just wanted to pull together 3 questions/confirmations:

1) I see that both the 275 and the 285 will fit, both seem to be available at a similar price. Is there a benefit of having one over the other? In my mind I should stick with the 275 as that is what the current ones are but if 285 has more rim protection, grip etc. then I can be persuaded.

2) I've read various comments about manufacture specific versions of these tyres (MO for Merc etc.). Should I get the ones without any manufacture's name? If so, are these always correct or just the vendors not detailing them correctly on their websites?

3) A thread on here talks about setting the pressures lower for the MPS4S tyres (31.5F and 33R) as opposed to 35F and 38R for the P-Zeros. Can anyone confirm that, that is correct or have any other advice/suggestions.

Overall I'm keen not to ruin the good work of the Lotus manufactures with my own lack of knowledge. It won't be going on a track but is an all weather daily drive, doing about 6,000 miles per year.

Thanks in advance.

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Welcome to TLF, Gareth. :welcome:

As a bit of background, the 285 Michelin Pilot Supersports (the predecessor to the PS4S) was the standard fit for the Evora 400. Myself, and many others, fitted them to our Ss and they work just fine. When my current set wear out, I’ll be replacing them with a set of 285 PS4S. 

Personally, I’ve always just opted for the ‘standard’ version of the PSS/PS4S. There is a lot of internet chatter about the different manufacturers’ compounds (MO/N etc) but frankly, they are all going to work very well. You might only tell the difference if you are professional tyre tester, on the ragged limit, on track. Such as @rallyesax;)

The PSS are set slightly lower than the Pirellis - 1.8/2.0 or 2.0/2.2 springs to mind. 

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😉

As @Bravo73 said, you can go for standard PS4S front and rear. Then you'll have no balance issue. 

On Evora 400, pressure is 2.0/2.2b so probably different from an Evora S but it goes with the wider tyre size. 

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12 hours ago, rallyesax said:

😉

As @Bravo73 said, you can go for standard PS4S front and rear. Then you'll have no balance issue. 

On Evora 400, pressure is 2.0/2.2b so probably different from an Evora S but it goes with the wider tyre size. 

I drive on Evora S standard PS4S with rim protection on the road.
This tire is more complete than the Pirellis in my eyes. It looks better and it protects lightweight rims much better. 
235/35/19 on 8x19 pressure 1.8b cold and 275/30/20 on 9,5x20 pressure 2.2.b cold. 
Geo has more camber at the front for additional turn in bite.  
If you´d run the bigger 285 rear you will also change the rake and gearing a little.




 

TLF-example.jpg

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Just saw a post in Facebook (Lotus Evora Owners Group) today: somebody uses the Corvette spec Michelins (even run flats) on his Evora 400 … 245 front and 285 rear.
He praises them … but this idea sounds horrible to me. 

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Thanks all for the swift and helpful responses.

I might swerve the run flats 🙂 but other than that, for someone of my limited ability the 275 or 285 MPS4S will be fine, probably best to get the standard tyre rather than a marque specific one and yes, to lower pressures.

Also, seems that getting the fronts done at the same time may be a good idea? They are P-Zeros and are in a fairly decent condition, so was keen not to bin them when they still have some life left...……?

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@rallyesax - any advise on what pressures to run the PS4 on the 18/19 rims on the Evora NA?  Currently I'm using same as recommended by Lotus for the P-zero 33psi front and 36 psi rear.  Is it a general rule that Michelin tyres will require less pressure than Pirelli tyres?

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2 hours ago, Gareth44 said:

Thanks all for the swift and helpful responses.

I might swerve the run flats 🙂 but other than that, for someone of my limited ability the 275 or 285 MPS4S will be fine, probably best to get the standard tyre rather than a marque specific one and yes, to lower pressures.

Also, seems that getting the fronts done at the same time may be a good idea? They are P-Zeros and are in a fairly decent condition, so was keen not to bin them when they still have some life left...……?

Yes, ideally, you should change the 4 of them to get a balanced car, especially on wet roads. I would have say the same if you were going Pirelli 😉

47 minutes ago, electro_boy said:

@rallyesax - any advise on what pressures to run the PS4 on the 18/19 rims on the Evora NA?  Currently I'm using same as recommended by Lotus for the P-zero 33psi front and 36 psi rear.  Is it a general rule that Michelin tyres will require less pressure than Pirelli tyres?

No, there is no such 'rule'. It depends of a lot of datas.

Concerning your specific pb. I could not say. It depends of the contact patch shape and the cornering stiffness working points the tire is trying to achieve under a certain amount of load. 

Without machines and computers, the easiest way is to try different pressure settings by yourself. Being carefull of checking it always in the same conditions (air temp, tyre temp) and not going too low or too high of course. For road use, you should play in between 28 and 35psi cold for this car. And why not, only change one axle at a time and see how you feel. 

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Thanks for the feedback.  I will make up a short loop with fun roads near me and have a play with the pressures to see what feels good.

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Just had my Evora fitted with MPS4, I had the garage inflate to 36Psi rear, 32 Psi, which was from memory for a higher load when driving.  Initial thoughts are that the ride was surprisingly quieter from the P-Zeros (but that really could be a placebo effect!).  Tyre's still scrubbing in so no further thoughts than this at the moment!

I am wondering what pressure people are running with the MPS4 - both road driving and track would be useful, as I have a mini track taster session coming up in April.

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From the posting history I think @Techyd has the 18/19 wheels so would have gone for the Pilot sport 4 as the 4s are not available in the correct size for the front.

The original handbook says 33/36psi for normal load, higher loads it goes up but I can't remember what too.  I have read on the forums that Lotus then revised the figures and lowered them slightly to around 30/33psi.  Many Evora owners running the Michelin tyres are preferring the lower pressures.  I've still got my winter tyres on but as soon as I switch back I'll be trying out the lower pressures.

For track work you want to use hot temperatures similar to your road cold temperature.  So for example if you run 33/36psi, then head out for a couple laps to warm up the tyres, come into the pits and reduce the pressure back down to 33/36psi.  Head out again for a few laps and check and reduce if required until you are running 33/36psi when your tyres are hot.  Be careful when heading out after a break as the tyres would have cooled a lot and the pressure will be significantly lower so take first few laps slowly to build up the heat and pressure back to correct hot settings.  Also take care when heading home at the end of the day.  The tyres will cool under normal driving conditions compared to track driving conditions so remember to pump the tyres back up before heading home.

I've only been to Bedford track and they had an air line to inflate your tyres, I'd imagine this is quite common so you would get away without having a compressor but I'd recommend getting a pressure gauge as they only cost £10-15 so not a great expense.

 

*** Edit found the forum post about the revised tyre pressures: 

 

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16 minutes ago, electro_boy said:

From the posting history I think @Techyd has the 18/19 wheels so would have gone for the Pilot sport 4 as the 4s are not available in the correct size for the front

Spot on.  I could source the 4s for the rears but not the front.

I've got myself a digital pressure gauge and compressor.  The pressure gauge gives a different readout to the TPMS dash read out - by some margin, and each wheel gives a different reading too 🤣 so I only pay attention to those if they get really low!

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hmm I know the spec sheet on the sensors give quite a wide accuracy range but in reality they've been similar to my pressure gauge.  At least if they were consistently off by +2psi you can easily adjust for it but if each sensor is off by a different amount its gonna be hard to judge if your tyres are Ok.  Not very helpful at all.

Dunno if there is a reset procedure for them? Maybe go for a short drive to activate the sensors, then deflate the tyre while engine and TMPS system is still on and re-inflate the tyre?

It bugs me when the tyres pressures are not symmetrical.  The TPMS system only does whole numbers so if one is 33.4psi and the other 33.6 it rounds them to 33 and 34! 

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I wouldn’t bother relying on the TPMS for any sort of accuracy. They tend to be the opposite - reliably inaccurate!

And that isn’t really what it’s there for. It’s there to detect (and then warn of) a sudden deflation (ie a puncture) of a tyre. 

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My Pzero fronts need replacing but I've decided to take the opportunity to change over to the Michelins all round.

Is the consensus now to go for the wider 285 rears (as per the 400) and if so could someone confirm these are the correct tyres please?

Fronts - 235/35R19 (91Y) XL TL Michelin Pilot Sport 4S PS4S

Fronts from Camskill

Rears - 285/30R20 (99Y) XL TL Michelin Pilot Sport 4S PS4S

Rears from Camskill

Thanks in advance :)

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Yes, they are exactly what I had fitted to my S SR to replace the P-Zeros, I could only find the rear 275s in either Audi or Merc spec (I can't remember which now), however the 285s have been fine as have the fronts. 

I have noticed a large difference (9mph) now between the analogue speedo and the mph on the Sat Nav, although, as I've only had the car a few months I'm not 100% sure it wasn't like that already!

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Thanks for confirming Gareth,

The std width 275s are available with Camskills at present so I think I will stick with those like the OP. By my reckoning though, changing to 285s should make less than 1% difference in speedo reading so that wouldn't explain the 9mph difference you're seeing, unless you're travelling at supersonic speeds 😀

Maybe it was already like that as you say.

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I think you are right, I think only noticed it as I was looking specifically after the tyre change. 

Not only are the Sat Nav and the speedo different, the 'alternative speed' kph reading, when converted to mph, is mid-way between the two!

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